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  • Rockwell lathe

    Well it seems as if the woodworkers here and on other sites have caused me to become interested in building a wood working hobby shop. I will also be building a metal working shop in conjunction with the former. ( I was just going to get a good miter saw and cheap table saw for a couple of projects around the house). 1500 bucks later and still no miter saw.

    Now to the topic:

    I just came across an older Rockwell lathe with a 3/4 hp motor, all of the standard accessories including the knives for 250 bucks. When we turned it on in his very quiet garage I had to put my ear right next to the unit to be able to hear it. The model number is 46-111. For another 50 bucks the fellow gave me a fully functional 18" scroll saw with xtra blades and a new in the box cast iron router table.

    Can anyone here shed a bit of light on this lathe? Was this a good deal or did I just toss some good money down the toilet?

    One thing the lathe did not have was a duplicater. I have found a few universal duplicaters on the net, are these a good idea or should I start looking really hard for an OEM duplicater somewhere?
    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

  • #2
    Plumber, The Rockwell lathe is a real piece of JUNK and I hate to see a freind get stuck with it. I will be there in the morning to take it off your hands. LOL Seriously, Rockwell is now Delta and you got a great deal on that find. I have been turning for some time now but have never looked at any of the duplicators. Maybe someone else can help out with info on those. All my turning is one off pieces and I just never had a need for one. Congrtas on the lathe and Happy Turning.
    info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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    • #3
      Thanks papadan,

      I hope to make some stair bannister supports for my brother and some heavy ballisters (hope thats the right term) for a deck project. My niece has already asked for a coffee table and a set of end tables LOL. I certainly want my turning projects to come out successful so I don't get discouraged and lose interest so I think I will get a duplicator before I try to make fifty matching pieces free hand. Went to pick up the lathe this morning and there were even more attachments like a chuck and additional knives. The router table and scroll saw were Sears but seemed very heavy duty.

      Will most brands of routers and router tables intermingle or will i need a Sears router to marry up properly? Am thinking of a combination kit that will both plunge and hook up to a table.

      Here is the hobby shop inventory so far, any good sugggestions for additional equipment would be appreciated. If I will only use it once a year I don't want to drop the funds on it right now.

      1 17" 16 speed drill press(older but perfect)
      1 6" circular sander with 4"x24 flat sander belt driven on stand(older but fully rebuilt)
      2 scroll saws 1 16"(new) and 1 18"(older but perfect)
      1 10" cabinet table saw with biesmeier fence system and cast iron extensions (new)
      1 Rockwell wood lathe (older but perfect)w/everything but duplicator
      1 Delta stationary metal band saw (new)
      1 craftsman 9" wood band saw (new)
      1 heavy router table (older but never used)
      1 heavy router extension for table saw (new)
      (No I have not bought my router yet)
      2 portable work extension stands
      1 industrial stainless steel shop vac
      3 heavy commercial banquet tables for project stands (used)
      1 Craftsman 6hp 150 psi 33gal compressor (new)
      I already have nearly every tool imaginable for a successful plumber/gas fitter except a generator/welder combination, which will almost fully out fit the metalworking side of my hobby.

      I have a raincheck for 110 bucks off the dewalt 12" sliding miter and 10% cash back on the dewalt 12 1/2" planer. But I have been told on good authority that Milwaukee will be soon introducing an entire new line of wood working equipment in the near future that will be made here in the US so I may hold off on the 12' double bevel slider miter saw and planer to see what they introduce.

      ------------------------------------------------------
      On a side note: Thanks to all of you sawdust junkies for getting me so interested in a new hobby that I have spent all of this years vacation money on tools (most of next years vacation too). Hope this is as much fun as it sounds. Will be visiting a few more outfitters tommorrow (yes I am taking off work to play) to see what else is out there and hopefully pick up some project plans. Will start off with something simple like an end table first.

      Two other questions, just found some good cedar 6x6s 10 ft and 12 ft long. Does cedar machine well on a lathe? Or would it be better to turn them into boards for cedar chests and jewelry boxes? Also thinking they might make for a good chest or drawer sides. Okay 3 questions. What is the best tool for ripping these posts down if I decide to go that route my new table saw or my new band saw?
      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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      • #4
        PLUMBER, I TOO HAVE THE SAME LATHE. PROBLEM IS WITH ALL THIS PLUMBING STUFF IN THE SHOP, IT'S A MESS TO CLEAN UP ALL THE WOOD CHIPS. NEED TO PUT IT ON WHEELS AND MOVE IT TO A FAR CORNER TO MAKE CLEAN UP EASIER. MAYBE A 4'' VAC. HOSE WOULD WORK BETTER.
        P.S ALREADY HAVE THE WELDER / GENERATOR.
        GOOD LUCK.

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        • #5
          PLUMBER RICK,

          Do you have a duplicator for your lathe? I have already been thinking of castor wheels with locks but was not sure if that would cause to much vibration.

          Which welder generator system do you have? I am thinking of at least 10,000 watts so I can rationalize the expense as back up power for my entire home and its appliances. I could get by with less but you know how that is.
          Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

          Comment


          • #6
            PLUMBER, I DON'T HAVE A DUPLICATOR. WAS MORE FOR A HOBBY THAN A PROJECT. SUGGEST TO ROLL THE LATHE AS FAR AWAY FROM ANYTHING YOUR WORRIED ABOUT DUST. THE VIBRATION WAS NEVER AN ISSUE.
            THE GENERATOR/ WELDER IS A LINCOLN WELD N POWER 4500 WATT. POWER DOESN'T GO OUT HERE FOR MORE THAN A MINUTE. THE ONE TIME I USED IT FOR THE HOUSE POWER WAS A DISASTER. I DIDN'T HAVE THE 2 PHASES/ LEGS BALANCED. 120/ 120 VOLT. BLEW THE POWER SUPPLY TO THE TV. NOW IF I TRY THAT AGAIN I'LL ONLY PLUG IN NECESSATIES.

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            • #7
              Rick,

              I see you're not sleeping tonight either.

              I am keeping my hobby shop completely seperate from where I work. ( No distractions that way) But you are right about dust. This thing started out as a hobby shop for my basement but has already outgrown that. It looks like my garage will now become a woodworking/metal shop unless I buy another building somewhere else entirely. There is a little shop I helped build about 25 years ago that is available now. Its built like a tank and will handle anything I would ever put it through.
              Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by plumber: What is the best tool for ripping these posts down if I decide to go that route my new table saw or my new band saw?
                Bandsaw, definately!
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                • #9
                  Just added a new Dewalt DW734 Thickness planer tonight and have an appointment to see a new in the box 37-195 Delta Jointer tomorrow night after work. My check book is smoking and my ink pen has burst into flames and there is still along way to go. Maybe I should have just taken up bowling?

                  I am thinking about blowing off the miter saw and getting one of Delta's arm saws, they are all made in the USA and have a five year warranty plus I could do a lot more with an arm saw than I could with a miter except take it with me and since I dont plan any woodworking in Jamacia anytime soon that shouldnt be a problem.
                  Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You might want to consider a dust collector. Sanding on a lathe can make a real mess and won't help your lungs either.

                    Here's a couple of pics of a small bowl I turned out of cedar:

                    .

                    This one will give you a ideal of the size:



                    A bandsaw is normally the tool used for resawing, but yours may be a little undersized to handle that cedar.

                    I don't have a duplicator for my lathe either. I don't intend to use it for production work and making 50 matched spindles sounds too much like production work for me. IMHO, that would take all the fun out of it.

                    Bob R

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                    • #11
                      Bob,

                      Those bowels are beautiful. What type of sealant or polish did you use to get such a high gloss?

                      Thanks for the dust collection tip, I scoped out a few Deltas last weekend at a tool show. Thought the industrial shop vac would be enough but am not so sure now.

                      There is a deck project that will require many matched ballisters. I would like them to be approx 3 or four inches thick at their fattest points.
                      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bob R: A bandsaw is normally the tool used for resawing, but yours may be a little undersized to handle that cedar.
                        Bob R
                        Great job on those bowls Bob.
                        You're probably right about the band saw. I didn't realize the poor guy only had a 9 incher!
                        Lorax
                        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                        • #13
                          Plumber,

                          "What type of sealant or polish did you use to get such a high gloss?"

                          I used blo to bring out the color, then applied a couple of coats of shellac to seal it since cedar is very porus. I buffed most of it off with steel wool and then applied a couple coats of wipe-on poly. I buffed that down to get rid of the plastic look.

                          A lot of people start with a shop-vac, but once you start adding tools like a jointer or planer, you'll really need a dust collector. I would give it some serious thought if I were you. You only get one set of lungs and the more dust you can collect at the source, the less you have to worry about.

                          Bob R

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                          • #14
                            When I was younger I always dreamed of a nine incher and now I find out even that is not big enough.

                            My uncle died of black lung from coal dust and it was not pretty, and working industrial construction much of my life my lungs have already been terribly abused so I will follow your advice Bob and get a dust system before I get going full tilt. Thanks Bob.
                            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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