Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hi and help me with electric hand planer

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hi and help me with electric hand planer

    Hi guys! How are you?

    Recently I had the opportunity to take a cheap number of boards for work. However, they were rejected at the factory (they had uneven surfaces), because I got so cheap and got it. In any case, I need a good hand planer and belt grinder. Any ideas?

    thanks
    You can visit my home blog and see my tools!
    ___________
    With best regards!
    Nicholas

  • #2
    How particular do you want to be with those boards? If you're looking to make them a uniform thickness the entire length of the board then the tools you mentioned probably won't get the job done for you. Usually boards like the ones you described are what is referred to as a cupped board, i.e. high ridges on the side and a low valley in the middle. You could use a benchtop planer to whittle away at the sides and the bottom however the end result will probably be a very thin board by the time you end up with a uniform thickness. However, if you only want to get something close to a uniform thickness then a belt sander would be the tool I would grab for that job. An electric hand planer is really more of a construction site tool then a woodworking tool anyways.
    Last edited by BadgerDave; 05-17-2018, 06:48 PM.
    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
      How particular do you want to be with those boards? If you're looking to make them a uniform thickness the entire length of the board then the tools you mentioned probably won't get the job done for you. Usually boards like the ones you described are what is referred to as a cupped board, i.e. high ridges on the side and a low valley in the middle. You could use a benchtop planer to whittle away at the sides and the bottom however the end result will probably be a very thin board by the time you end up with a uniform thickness. However, if you only want to get something close to a uniform thickness then a belt sander would be the tool I would grab for that job. An electric hand planer is really more of a construction site tool then a woodworking tool anyways.
      BadgerDave , thanks for answer! So...Yes you are right in the title. I do not need perfectly flat boards.

      I considered the option with belt sander (I have it) is not bad, but it will not make the grooves that I needed and it seems to me that the hand planer will better polish the surface. Just in case the belt sander is on my hook, but still I would like to hear your suggestions a bout hand planers. I yesterday talked with the guys from another forum and they gave me a link to the hand planer rewiews. What can you say to this?I was interested in the hand planer DEWALT. I already looked at it on a review on YouTube.



      Click image for larger version

Name:	284.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	198.5 KB
ID:	730783

      Another reason why I'm so sure is that I saw these boards and the voice seemed to me that their difference from each other is not that big. My friend works at this sawmill.
      <---- here, u can see that.
      Last edited by Adany; 05-18-2018, 05:13 AM.
      You can visit my home blog and see my tools!
      ___________
      With best regards!
      Nicholas

      Comment


      • #4
        if that is you lumber stack in the pictures, then get yourself a good surface planer, and cover the lumber so it does not get wet, or sun beat,

        I do not think you will like the results of a hand planer, and if your going to get a hand planer, I would suggest to not using powered hand planers but a true hand plane of yesteryear, using a jack or a jointer planer, a good surface planer will leave a smooth surface, and I would recommend an orbital sander over a belt sander (unless the belt sander was like a time saver sander),

        a surface planer will do a great job, to clean up the lumber and flatten it up correctly. (and I really suggest a stand alone planer or semi comercercal machine and not a bench top unit),

        my two cents,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BHD View Post
          if that is you lumber stack in the pictures, then get yourself a good surface planer, and cover the lumber so it does not get wet, or sun beat,

          I do not think you will like the results of a hand planer, and if your going to get a hand planer, I would suggest to not using powered hand planers but a true hand plane of yesteryear, using a jack or a jointer planer, a good surface planer will leave a smooth surface, and I would recommend an orbital sander over a belt sander (unless the belt sander was like a time saver sander),

          a surface planer will do a great job, to clean up the lumber and flatten it up correctly. (and I really suggest a stand alone planer or semi comercercal machine and not a bench top unit),

          my two cents,

          No, its not my Just a friend spent in the warehouse to show the fresh defective boards, they are so folded. As you can see, there are a lot of them. Perhaps some of these boards now lie in my yard, but not all of them

          Okey, thanks BHD . Maybe you really right... Tomorrow I'll test your advice in practice
          You can visit my home blog and see my tools!
          ___________
          With best regards!
          Nicholas

          Comment

          Working...
          X