Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
affordable 10" plexiglass blade Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • affordable 10" plexiglass blade

    All of my saw blades are CMT. If CMT made a plexi blade i would buy it, despite the fact that i will not be using it as often as my other blades just because when i find a product line i like i stick with it.

    this blade will not see a whole lot of use, but it will be a need to have on occasion.

    can anyone recommend an economical plexi blade.

    No more short cuts. I have tried a few suggestions and tried other blades/techniques for cutting plexi and they either did not produce a quality cut or the worst one was when the piece i was cutting shattered. even though i was not standing directly behind it, a piece still hit me in the chest and hurt like hell.

    I know amana and tenryou both make them, (big money). anyone know of one more economical?

    thanks
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    I just use the stock blade that came with the saw.
    Andy B.

    Comment


    • #3
      The stock blade?

      I mean no disrespect to either you or ridgid but the "stock blade" that came with my Ridgid contractor's table saw i use only when i have to cut crap wood, old wood, wood i dont know if it has metal in it, etc. that is about all it is good for. I have it sharpened from time to time, as needed, for a few bucks just to keep a blade around for shi- work. same with the delta blade that came on my miter saw.

      the problem with most blades and plexiglass is one of two things. they either chip or crack the plexi, or they melt the plexi. the other problem is that if the blade is not specifically made for it, it dulls quickly. I tried a melamine blade for the hell of it and it dulled it (and we had some melting)

      I believe in the proper tool for the job. And the reason they make a blade specifically for plexiglass is that it is the proper tool for the job.
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

      Comment


      • #4
        I believe that Frued has a blade specifically for plexi. Don't know the cost.

        Comment


        • #5
          Rob

          Thanks, that is new to me but i am sure a freud blade will be in the 40-50 price range, the amana, and other high end blades run between 75-90

          ill look into the freud
          \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes thanks


            Freud does make a plexi blade. about 20 bucks cheaper than the high end blades. i am sure it will do fine for my limited use. nothing against freud, but i am partial to CMT

            i have a freud thin kerf i am looking to get rid of. i do not like it. used twice. Have a few of their router bits and forstner bits, all with no complaints,

            i think freud is going to be the way to go here


            thanks
            \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

            Comment


            • #7
              Space, make sure you use a zero clearance insert on your saw. Standard inserts will allow too much flex in the plexi and cause chipping and breaking. I use a 60 tooth carbide tipped blade for plexi. Straight for heavy and backwards for the thin stuff. It does melt the thin but it peels off easy and leaves a nice edge. I don't list a brand name for my blade because I don't know. It is a Vermont American/Craftsman/Skil/Black & decker/Bosch.

              [ 01-10-2005, 06:39 AM: Message edited by: papadan ]
              info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

              Comment


              • #8
                Have you considered a 7 1/4" blade? Cheaper than a 10" blade and works just as well (unless you're cutting 3" thick plexiglass of course)!
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                Comment


                • #9
                  Lorax

                  yes i have thought about it, but i may be overthinking this. a 7 1/4 blade on my 10" table saw will spin faster. this could cause more heat and cause melting?

                  I always use a zero clearance for everything i do!

                  thanks
                  \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Space,

                    I am not so sure that the blade will spin faster. The blade will have less mass and therefore accellerate more quickly, but the motor has a maximum RPM that shoud have the same "top end" as a 10" blade. Also, the circumferance of a 71/4" blade is less than the circumferance of a 10" blade which means that it is traveling a shorter distance in the same amount of time which equals a slower speed.

                    You may be able to get away with the smaller (and less expensive) blade.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by spacebluesonoma:
                      Lorax

                      yes i have thought about it, but i may be overthinking this. a 7 1/4 blade on my 10" table saw will spin faster. this could cause more heat and cause melting?

                      I always use a zero clearance for everything i do!

                      thanks
                      SPACE, the blade will not be sppinning any faster, however the rim speed will be slower. Huh? yeah, its true. The blade is fixed securely to the arbor, so it must spin at the same speed (RPM) as the arbor. The greater the radius of the blade the faster the rim speed will be. this is because the outer edge (the rim) of the blade must travel a greater distance around than the arbor in one revolution.

                      As an example;

                      if we use 5000 RPM as the arbor speed, then the outer surface of the 5/8" diameter arbor is traveling approx. 818.1223 feet/minute. At the same time and also rotating at 5000 RPM, the rim of a 10" blade is moving at roughly 13,089.9583 feet per minute.

                      (Don't hold me to these numbers, they are rough estimates, +/- a couple FPM. I did the math in my head pretty quickly. I not as fast as Mr. Spock at computing such figures but I'm working on it

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X