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best bit set for my tools?

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  • best bit set for my tools?

    Just bought the brushless 5 pc set from home depot. I am new to power tools ( never needed them). Whats the best bits to get for my drills, and best blades for the saws? Thanks in advance. Will be doing stuff around the house, wood working mainly and dry wall.

  • #2
    I would just go down to Home depot or other location, and buy a mid priced, blades and bits, I like dewalt reciprocating blades, bought some Irwin blades and they seem to be good, (it is what was available for me) but there are other brands, I like lenox hole saws, and they make IMO the best band saw blades, diablo has excellent circular,saw blades, milwaukee and lot of other brands that are good, nothing wrong with High priced product, but normally (IMO) not the best buy, for normal use, (a lot depends on how and what there used for),

    some are better for some things and some are better for other,

    I try for the best Value, not necessary the best tool,
    YOU buy that $200 dollar set of 29 piece drill bit set, and snap a bit, you will cry, you buy the $50 set, you go down and buy a replacement or two off the shelf, and go on with life,

    if you choose to buy the low price sets, (they may do you fine, I bought a few sets of $14.00, 29 piece sets from HD for the Grandkids and keep one for myself, a few years ago at Christmas, they turned out to be reasonable good bits, for general use,

    bits and blades are consumables, expect them to wear out and need to be replaced, drill bits can be sharpened, if you have the manual skill, or a "Drill doctor",

    For cutting new drywall, score it with a utility knife ( I use stanley utility knives), and snap it, a reciprocating saw or a Hand drywall saw, if one needs to "saw it"

    Last edited by BHD; 03-14-2019, 10:32 AM.
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    • #3
      one more thing, do some comparison shopping,

      watch for price gouging,, I have seen the same tool or product, priced from $14 up to $60 for example, same product,
      depending on whos selling it,
      (amazon pages are full of products that range all over the place, for the same thing same part number),
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the information guys!

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        • #5
          As for the sawzall if cutting metal, I have found Lennox blades to be quite good. When cutting metal, fill a windex bottle with some dish soap and water, and spray it on while cutting. Will greatly extend the life of your blade. We (volunteer fire dept) use the lennox blades as well as the soap/water technique when doing extrication from car wrecks.

          For cutting wood with sawzall or jig saw, Lennox, DeWalt and Bosch are all good blades, with DeWalt probably being the least expensive.
          Last edited by Gofor; 03-14-2019, 02:20 PM.
          Practicing at practical wood working

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          • #6
            Honestly, do as BHD says, shop around. Buy some sets if you must, you will soon find out what you use the most and can upgrade individual bits as needed. Keep an eye out at HD, I bought a nice Milwaukee impact driver set on clearance for $5, should have bought multiples. I have a set of drill bits at Lowe's for like $9, not great quality but the do good at work. I replace with better quality as needed.

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            • #7
              You should get a basic set of smaller bits so you can predrill all holes your filling with a screw. Plan on breaking your bits so look up your most used sizes and order them in multiples amounts because it just a matter of time your lose or break a bit. I'd try to keep your main set intact and use up the bits you order in quantity. If your not already familiar, learn what types of screws to use with the material your working with.

              There are different types of drywall screws, try a familiarize yourself with the type and length your likely to use no pre drilling necessary on these. Below you can view see a small example of different type of drywall screws, there are many more. Note the coarse as well as fine thread types. Coarse is for wood, fine in for metal, length depends on thickness or layers of material. You can find all that information online or at a specialty supplier hard to say at big box stores.

              I use a lot of panhead screws for fastening brackets for shelves and curtain rods. Often the screws that come with both are too short or otherwise inadequate and you should always predrill those screws. On the second chart you can see the recomended pilot hole size for wood screws but the pilot hole would the same size for any screw type fastened to wood.

              A lot of good information on screws and fasteners can be found online or in the book section at your local hardware store.
              Last edited by Mightyservant; 03-14-2019, 09:46 PM.

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              • #8
                I gave up on dry wall screws (except on drywall), but for general woodworking using screws, I have found the GRK screws as a very good screw, the points are designed to reduce splitting of the wood, (I find the GRK screws to be better than Mcfeelys, I bought a box of theres with the square drive, and the kids (20 years old) I had running the screws in, could not get them to bite, went to town and bought some GRK and the kids could run them in easly, (we were refasting drop siding on a older 1930's building, ) I get the one's with the torks head, for kreg jig, I use the square drive, (I think the actual name is roberson), and I use a lot of socket head screws that are either 1/4" or 5/16" drive heads, Philips are OK, but some of the other drives are much better, you start driving hard to drive screws, and having a true positive drive bit and screw, will make a world of difference in success, of the project,







                Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                attributed to Samuel Johnson
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                Comment


                • Bob D.
                  Bob D. commented
                  Editing a comment
                  True, a phillips head is almost as outdated as straight slot head for screws. So many other better choices today.

                  I like Bosch for jig saw blades.

              • #9
                BHD brings up a good point that may be of future interest as you familiarize with screws and fasteners. There are some high performance screws in addition to the basic types you might already know about. The bit they require are a great improvement over the Phillips.

                It would be a good idea to get an organizer to keep all your screws in one place. I did that for my daughter and it makes it conveiniant when I'm doing repair at her house.

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                • #10
                  It sounds like you are a beginner...with respect!

                  If you have a Harbor freight tools store near you watch for your local ads.
                  they often have a 1/16" to 1/2" twist drill set with storage box for $9.99 to $19.99.
                  These bits will get you off to a good start without breaking the bank.

                  I have used their drill bits for years! Now since you are new to using some
                  power tools you started out nicely with the Ridgid tool line. Did you properly register
                  them for the LSA program??????

                  I would hold off buying expensive drill bits be it twist, Forstner, spade, hole saw, etc.etc.
                  You should learn how to safely use your tools .

                  Reciprocating saw blades and circular saw blades are also like drill bits, there are really cheap ones
                  and really expensive ones.
                  I'd suggest you buy a set or assortment from a better brand such as DeWalt, Milwaukee, or Ridgid when they
                  are on sale.

                  As you gain confidence and your skill set increases then you should look for higher quality
                  disposables like saw blades and drill bits.

                  Check in often as there are many skilled folks that can help guide you....

                  Cactus Man

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by drummerman247 View Post
                    Just bought the brushless 5 pc set from home depot. I am new to power tools ( never needed them). Whats the best bits to get for my drills, and best blades for the saws? Thanks in advance. Will be doing stuff around the house, wood working mainly and dry wall.
                    Hi, drummerman! As well as you I would also like to become a DIYer and have just started to do all the small things around my house without outside help. And that is a complete challenge I must say. But before shopping you should always analyze which tool do you exactly need, online and ofline prices, quality and safety of this or that tool. In this case you can have a look at https://drilling-it.com/best-counter...-sets-reviews/ . They always provide sufficient and helpful siformation

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