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  • Runtime of cordless tools

    Brandman, is there some place that I can get the information on how long a ridgid battery will last on a charge? More secificaly how many cuts or holes would I be able to saw or drill? I'm very interested in the Ridgid tools and would like to know as much as I can about them.
    You can\'t make footprints in the sands of time by sitting on your butt, and who wants to make butt prints in the sands of time.

  • #2
    I would think that there are too many variables involved to come up with any kind of an accurate answer to your question. Soft wood, hard wood, length of screw, diameter of drill bit, etc. Possibly Brandman can tell you how long a charge will last under no load conditions.
    ================================================== ====
    ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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    • #3
      I agree with Badger.
      "how long a charge will last under no load conditions"... seems to me it's the only constant scenario one can benchmark. With that, what's the point.

      Fine Woodworking has a "2004 Tool Guide" out.
      It has an article on several cordless driver comparo. Lesson: Performance cannot be solely attributed to voltage and batt-pack capacity alone.

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      • #4
        Measure once cut twice,

        I can give you my experience with the new ridgid cordless tools in the 4 piece combo kit compared to 18volt Dewalt tools.

        For the drill I tested using a 1" auger bit thru 2x6's, the Ridgid drilled 52 holes compared to the Dewalts 35. Both drill were set at their low speed setting, both are less then a year old my Ridgid being a month old and my buddies Dewalt being about 6 months old.

        We also tested the circular saw cutting up scrap paint covered 2x6's. The Ridgid made 72 cuts and the Dewalt made 57, neither of us ever let go of the trigger and let me tell you my Ridgid was cutting faster.

        We didn't get around to testing the reciprocating saws head to head as he didn't have a charged battery.

        To sum it all up the Ridgid tools went about 20% further. On a side note after each test The Ridgid batteries weren't hot to the touch while the Dewalt batteries were very warm. This could be the deciding factor as to why the Ridgid out performed the Dewalt in our test, Ridgid made a more effecient battery that keeps itself cool under load thus lasting longer. A hot tool or battery wastes charge dramaticly.


        Hope that helps, We'll run some more tests next time.

        Ryan

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        • #5
          Were you testing the Ridgid X2 18v against the DeWalt XRP? Or was it the 18v DeWalt compact?

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          • #6
            I believe its the 18V Dewalt XRP as its a fairly new kit my friend has had only 5 or 6 months. Mine is the 4 piece Ridgid 18V X2 kit. My kit and his are almost identical both containing Hammerdrill, Circular saw, Reciprocating saw, flashlight, 2 batteries and charger. He did get a free Radio/Charger as a promo with his kit. But then again the charger that comes with the Dewalt kits is less then satisfactory if you compare it to the Ridgid dual 30min charger with forced air,etc. All in all I'm very happy with my new Ridgid tools, I almost went with the Dewalts about 8 months ago, but never got around to purchasing it, so I'm glad I waited now. Both are great tool sets, well above the standard, But tack on a better warranty, more power and better designed batteries and the desicion is made for you.

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            • #7
              I heard a rumor from a Home Depot associate (who seemed to have yellow blood, like alot of Home Depot associates) that a fast charger actually destroys the battery.

              He said DeWalt makes a 15 min. charger but they admit it is very bad for the battery cells. He said that the air vents on the Ridgid charger wouldn't make any difference in a climate like mine (Phoenix), where the heat destroys batteries.

              I'm not a contractor but a heavy Do-It-Yourselfer, who watches a little too much Bob Villa I don't charge my batteries every day, but in heat like we have here in Arizona, I'm afraid to do anything else to shorten the life of my battery....should I fast charge?????

              p.s. What is the "life of a tool"? Is it the rest of my life, or the expected life of a tool, because if I don't use my drill but only twice in five years, then in seven years it wears out or the batteries wear out, are they still under lifetime warranty. Sorry for two posts in one subject....I'm new to this thing

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              • #8
                I've looked closely at the Ridgid batteries. Nice to have the slide jobbies but you can see the terminals throught the "mesh" of the air vents. Most jobsites I have been on are a bit dirty. Don't know if dust will get in there and eat at those connectors. "wear and tear" or "defects from manufacture and workmanship"?

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                • #9
                  The contacts are sealed, probably a clear plastic, but they are not open to the air.

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                  • #10
                    Your right, a 15 minute charge is bad for the battery pack, but that depends, what is amperage is the pack rated at? 1000 miliwatts? 15 minutes would be just fine then. Compare apples to apples.

                    Ridgid packs have a thermistor in them. They won't take take a charge till they reach a temp thats safe for them to charge. The fan on the charger will cool them down to a safe temp. However, if your out working in 130 degree temps, then you might have a problem. I would say though, that if you are working outside in those times, it maybe time to head inside for a quick 30 minute charging break, and drink some water while your at it.

                    A 15 minute charger with no air pumping through the packs to cool them down is much worse than a 30 minute charger that does cool the packs. Apples and oranges... im hungrey

                    Originally posted by Fred J.:
                    I heard a rumor from a Home Depot associate (who seemed to have yellow blood, like alot of Home Depot associates) that a fast charger actually destroys the battery.

                    He said DeWalt makes a 15 min. charger but they admit it is very bad for the battery cells. He said that the air vents on the Ridgid charger wouldn't make any difference in a climate like mine (Phoenix), where the heat destroys batteries.

                    I'm not a contractor but a heavy Do-It-Yourselfer, who watches a little too much Bob Villa I don't charge my batteries every day, but in heat like we have here in Arizona, I'm afraid to do anything else to shorten the life of my battery....should I fast charge?????

                    p.s. What is the "life of a tool"? Is it the rest of my life, or the expected life of a tool, because if I don't use my drill but only twice in five years, then in seven years it wears out or the batteries wear out, are they still under lifetime warranty. Sorry for two posts in one subject....I'm new to this thing
                    [ 11-18-2003, 06:03 PM: Message edited by: mr man ]

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