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Help ! what to buy, Dewalt, Ridgid or Makita

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  • Help ! what to buy, Dewalt, Ridgid or Makita

    I have been looking at the Dewalt dw987 18 volt drill and the Ridgid r84015 18 volt but which one do you recomend any help would be Great thanks .

  • #2
    what kind of drill do you think is going to be recomended on a Ridgid message board ?? and if you aren't sure what kind to buy perhaps you should consider changing your name ??

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Benthic2:
      what kind of drill do you think is going to be recomended on a Ridgid message board ??
      As I said on another thread, you will find some of Ridgids toughest critics on this board and that's a good thing.
      The folks here will recommend what they feel is best for a given situation.
      Personally, I have the Craftsman 19.2 volt combo kit and I love it. [img]smile.gif[/img] It even comes with a hard case, but that's a topic for a different thread or 2 or 3 or .......!
      Lorax
      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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      • #4
        I vote DeWalt but that's cuz it's a proven tool in the cordless drills I prefer that.

        Most on this site will say Ridgid

        Deferrring to benthic2's previous response

        Jake

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        • #5
          I've had for a while now the Dewalt xrp 18 volt 1/2" chuck. No complaints about the drill and it sees a bunch of use.
          JJC

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          • #6
            This is a choice between "good" & "good"...I have tested both drills in the field...I have owned Dewalt 18vlt tools for five years and think they are excellent proven tools..but I have a pile full of defective batteries....My buddy owns the XRP and I have the Ridgid...FACT: Ridgid has more power and charges the battery in half the time..FACT DeWalt has the largest line of 18vlt tools and is proven durability and quality (I have dropped the drill and light numerous times)...I have the benefit of battery's for life my buddy doesn't....I have to send my kids to college with this tool..I've logged over 50hrs with the Ridgid hammer/drill in the 4pack 18vlt....Its solid.....I suggest that you go with whatever feels better in your hand.....Another route is Milwaukee and Bosch...which are both excellent choices...If you are not earning daily wages with the tool I suggest "Craftsman"....maybe I might get nasty e-mail....but Sears is really stretching this line (refined Ryobi tools)...and value for the dollar and power is there....GO with RIDGID before 1/31/04 (free batteries), its a good tool....If Ridgid did not have this deal now....It would be Milwaukee all the way.....I personally don't think Makita offers the power you want...they are quality tools concentrating liteness and erogonomics..

            [ 01-21-2004, 03:25 PM: Message edited by: paul v. ]

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            • #7
              As I've stated on other posts, I bought the Ridgid combo set, but took it back and bought the Milwaukee combo. I absolutely love it. The Ridgid drill was nice, but seemed either too heavy or badly balanced. It also has some quirks that bothered me, although someone else may not feel the same way. I also recently used the 15.6 panasonic drill, which is awesome. It is very light and very powerful. However, the combo set is not nearly as good as the Ridgid or Milwaukee sets. As for Dewalt, it just seems rough and primative compared to the Mil or Panasonic, both of which run as smoothly as an electric razor. Also, the warranties for Mil and Ridgid are much better than the others. I think that ultimately it comes down to how the tool feels in your hand, especially when you are using it for long periods of time. For me, the Milwaukee and the Panasonic felt best. For others, the Dewalt or Ridgid may feel best. Good luck.

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              • #8
                I would stay away from Dewalt. I (and my company) have used them for years and one of 2 things always happens, it jumps out of the speed selection (it has a speed selector on the top labeled 1 or 2). When it does this, it just spins without any action. The second is that the shaft goes out of true-meaning it spins wobbly. Hard to deal with when you need to drill a precise hole.

                I have a 2 Craftsman-a new 19v, I hate it (torque is horrible) and an old Craftsman 14v-I swear by it, but they don't make it anymore. I heard from my bud at HD is that the Ridgid is a killer drill-I will let you know when I purchase one.

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                • #9
                  [QUOTE]Originally posted by RealProTek:
                  [QB]

                  I have a 2 Craftsman-a new 19v, I hate it (torque is horrible) QUOTE]

                  Are you saying it has too much torque or not enough torque? Mine is definately a "two-hander" with the torque cranked up. In my opinion, there is no such thing as "too much torque" when you need it. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                  Lorax
                  "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                  • #10
                    If you do not go with RIDGID, look seriously at the PANASONIC 15.6 Volt. The batteries and charger are new technology (metal-hydride). Longer cycle times between charges. Ergonomics are a personal thing. I find it slightly heavy compared to 12 Volt Hitachi, but much better than other 18 Volt models.

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                    • #11
                      Just took a look at the Panasonic-darn sweet cordless...sounds like a turbine engine on a jet. I do computers/security equipment and when I hear this sound in machine, more often then not, I buy it. Lorax, I just think the Crapsman tool went to the crapper. The 19.2 drill doesn't have the torque as my Dewalt has. I can almost stop the spin by holding the end. I use the Dewalt until the popping out of gear annoys me. By the way, the other drill I have is a Craftsman 12 volt (not 14v as I mentioned) industrial that I have had for at least 5 years and serves me well. By the way, one of the batteries finally died on the 12v-not bad for over 5 years of use.

                      I haven't tried the Ridgid drills yet, but I will. I use drills alot in my business and need long battery/drill life, torque, balance, and a good warranty.

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                      • #12
                        I recommend A NO BUY on Panasonic...take it from someone who uses the tool and 3rd party info to back any claim....I had 15.6 for a year...Dead battery and $120 to replace...do a search on NI-cd vs NiMh....yes its good technology for computers not power tools...
                        Here is some good 3RD party info on battery life.....ME I BELIVE IN NI-CAD BY FAR!!!!
                        http://www.mrotoday.com/mro/archives...lessFM2000.htm

                        "It is true that Ni-MH cells will run a tool longer between charges, but we've seen the number of times that battery can be charged is considerably less than a Ni-Cd battery," says E.J. Loferski, cordless tool product manager at Milwaukee Electric Tool.

                        [ 01-25-2004, 11:52 AM: Message edited by: paul v. ]

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                        • #13
                          Had DeWalt, battery life was short. Bought craftsman, lousy chucks.Craftsman batteries outlasted Dewalt. Put the DeWalt chuck on Craftsman drill, great spare drill. Now have a 18 volt Ridgid X2. Great chuck and hopefully batteries for life. Nice big drill with lots of torque.

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                          • #14
                            paul v. I read the URL on batteries. Nice tourist information. Presents both sides. Demonstrates lack of thought in testing. What is the big deal freezing a battery in solid ice? Temperature will be roughly 32 degrees. Orange groves in Florida use this method to keep fruit from freezing. Test a battery set outside in 0 degree F weather for 12 hours. Negative temperatures would be even better.

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