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dewalt vs ridgid

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  • dewalt vs ridgid

    I posted a few questions in the RIDGID SURVEY if anyone has a chance to review the post. Same subject.

    New question. Are any of the 18V battery chargers compatible with other brands batteries. My overstuffed garage ate my dewalt charger. That's what i get for leaving it on the washing machine.

  • #2
    The only thing that can be remotley close to your dewalt is black and decker. The are made my the same company but mold the battery cases slightly different.

    There are no other brands that are compatable. Go get a new charger, or sell of you batteries and get ridgid.

    I have compared the two brands and like Ridgid better. dewalt charges for an hour no matter what but, ridgid will charge it in 30 minutes or (less if it is only slighty used)
    "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
    "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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    • #3
      I heard a rumor, that the faster a charge time, the shorter the life of a battery. Any truth to this?

      I was told this once by a cell phone company, but they said that it generates more heat, and the more heat generated, the shorter the life of a battery.

      Could someone please help? I run through ridgid batteries somewhat regularly, and I'm wondering if there is someway I can increase the life.

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      • #4
        what the hell your batteries are covered by the lifetime warranty

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        • #5
          Tis true that charging heat will shorten the life of a battery. Ridgid dual chargers for the MAX HC batteries have a fan that blows air through the batteries the entire time it is on the charger. They also will not charge a battery that is too hot (or cold).

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          • #6
            that's right, No matter what brand batteries you have. Electricty likes certian temperatures, this is why when its hot some recesed lights will shut off with the switch still on. The same if it is too cold. Some floresent lights won't ever start in a cold garage with out the right ballast.
            To bad batteries didn't come with a little device inside to regulate the flow of DC current in and out.
            "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
            "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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            • #7
              Rapid charging of NiCads is a detriment to long life. Heat definitely causes problems, but the heat is generated by over volting the chemical make-up of the battery. This basically causes the battery chemistry to react (almost like boiling) faster than it can normally handle the voltage. A slow "trickle" charge is best for the battery, but not for those of us who need the battery the same day! Adding a fan to the charge helps disipate the heat, but the fact is, the chemistry is still being pushed too hard.

              Similarly, even on a more normal charge rate, a NiCad shouldn't be left on the charger for longer than is takes to charge the battery. Many chargers will have a sensor to monitor the heat and voltage. Once fully charged, some chargers will kick back to trickle mode. But this is still charging and if left in on the charger too long, will eventually deteriorate. Sort of like letting a pot of water simmer...it never reaches boil, but eventually the liquid (or chemical make-up, in the case of a battery) will be useless.

              So, the designer/manufacturer has to balance the time it takes the charge with the patience (or lack thereof) of the typical customer who simply will not put up with a charge time of 8 to 12 hours or longer.

              CWS

              [ 09-27-2005, 10:50 PM: Message edited by: CWSmith ]

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              • #8
                To answer Polar Sparky question, My Lithium-ion batteries for the new Milwaukee V28 tools have circuitry right inside the battery that is suppose to do just that - regulate the current in and out [img]smile.gif[/img]
                Unless you are the lead Dog, the scenery does not change...

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                • #9
                  Everyone wants faster charging times and their batteries suffer for it. Next gen 36volt tools will be out soon. 25 minute charging times for the litium-ion batteries.
                  I don't work for Ridgid and I don't work for Home Depot but I likely know more about both than someone who works at either.

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                  • #10
                    If the battery charging circuitry has sensors to detect rapid charge,heat and potential overcharge one is okay.
                    Heck look at all the Makita old 9.jobbies that came back time after time for a beating.
                    Even those old tools by todays cordless standards did a heck of a job in their day with no special circuitry really.

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                    • #11
                      Well what about XRP 12-18 Volt DeWalt batteries & chargers? They advertise they have a "tune up" mode on their charger where they recommend something like after every 10 charges of the battery, you let it sit on the charger for 8 hours so it can tune up the battery supposedly. How does this work with what has been said?

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                      • #12
                        I can't speak for the technology that DeWalt may use. I do have a smart charger for other types of NiCads and NiMh batteries. For the NiCads, that particular charging system has a "conditioning" mode which basically drains the batteries and monitors their condition with regard to heat, resistance, battery voltage etc. At the proper point they are then charged, agian with the battery being monitored. Recommendation for "conditioning" is for every 15 to 20 charges, I believe.

                        CWS

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                        • #13
                          After working more with one of my friends he told me that if his dewalt is ever unpluged while charging it will drain the battery again and then recharge it. and after that happens it really starts to kill your battery.

                          My ridgid batteries are charged once and if unpluged it will start over by checking the battery. If it is fully charged the red light will stop and the green will be on without blinking. Telling me the battery is already fully charged.

                          [ 12-14-2005, 06:27 PM: Message edited by: Polar Sparky 1224 ]
                          "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
                          "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Polar Sparky, I think what your friend said might not hold water. Reason I say is because I have had the charger plug pulled on my 14.4 drill's charger/battery numerous times (it drives me nuts, I try to avoid having it happen but some dolt comes along on the construction site..I've sure you've heard the story). Usually what happens is when I plug it back in it blinks for about 2-4 minutes and then the light goes solid again indicating it is charged. It is a 1 hour charger, so if it drained the battery again and then had to re-charge it after it was unplugged then you'd think it would take more than 2-4 minutes for the battery light to go solid again indicating it is charged.

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                            • #15
                              I just went by what my coworker said. I have a dewalt as well and mine will always charge it for an hour. My ridgid will check the battery and then charge it.
                              It could be user error or product defect.

                              Was your charger and battery made in Europe? [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img] just kidding

                              at my jobsite it is too cold to charge your batteries and so the red light always comes on, even if the battery is totally dead.

                              [ 12-16-2005, 08:00 PM: Message edited by: Polar Sparky 1224 ]
                              "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
                              "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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