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  • BrandMan

    BrandMan
    You would want us to forget about the color & service we are getting and wait on the new products and then judge. You told me Ryobi in SC in not doing CS, it was TTI. You are right, except TTI is Ryobi's parent company and they are both here together.

    When we all started buying Ridgid, if it was broken they would help us fix it. Now they say pack it up and carry it up to 100 miles and wait on us to fix it.

    It is not the tools I have the problem with or the color, it is the service. Ridgid has not only shortened the warranty, they are cost cutting by making it hard to get tools repaired under warranty with waiting lines and having to pack up a tool and carry it who knows where.

    Tell me it is not so.

    SCWood

  • #2
    sc, i fix tools for a living. the ridge lifetime warranty is a myth and always has been.(defects in material and woorkmanship)ONLY.HELL I WILL WARRANTY say for ex.4.5 in. grinder made by metabo inthe year 1999 if it was well taken care of. and that goes for a dewalt a milw.,ridgid or any other manu.that we are a warranty center . the customer is always right. do not bring me in something that is beat to a pulp in less than a year and expect warranty. and dont expect warranty on any wear iteams either. the new line of ridgid are nothing but copys of everything else out there

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    • #3
      Jon
      That is the point I have to pack up my jointer and carry it 100 miles if a knob breaks. A year ago Ridgid would send me one. That is a big difference to me.

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      • #4
        For me, I have realized that evolution is a fact of life. We can adjust, or be left behind wellering in our own sarrow. For a knob, it would be cheaper to order, than drive 100+ miles to have warrentied. And I'm affraid that is the kind of thing that has brought this all about.

        Big ticket items like motors and the like didn't do it, it's the little things from washers and nuts, to knobs and handles. The least expensive things that cost the most to handle with man hours and shipping.

        They just made it clear that for you the customer, it's cheaper to purchase, and keep the price of the machine down to cover the over whelming expense they incure to take care of.

        Once the thereoy is grasped, it becomes common sense. They still have to have man hours to get it to you, they are somewhat reimbursed by the cost of the item, and shipping vs incuring it all. In the long run, we all benifit from less expensive, more affordable machines, and more going to product development, which again, we all benifit from in the long run.

        In my line of work, I have moved into the office from the field. I have been educated in these hard times of such things. Our company itself is restructuring. And like the dedicated customers of Ridgid, it's hard to make the "field" employees understand just what the just of all the changes can mean.

        2 years down the road, those who grasp and understand the changes we are going through, will see the benefits of the changes with bonuses and better benifits. Those "old timers" dedicated to the way it worked in the 80's, is finding the unemployment line fast.

        I see little difference, because my understanding of the "new age" of things is becoming much more clearer to me. All I can say is open your minds to the "BIG" picture of things. Look under the surface, look beyond the cover. The pages hold much more wealth than the cover can ever hope to impose.
        John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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