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  • Jig Saw's

    I have had and been happy with my Milwaukee Jigsaw. Ever since I bought my Hilti SF-121A, i have fallen in love with Hilti. They have apparently this year released a line of jig saw's. Worth looking at if you are in need of a new jig saw! These look pretty impressive.

    http://www.us.hilti.com/holus/module...jsp?OID=-15547
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    8.4 amps
    I thought my ridgid was powerful at 6 amps

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow, thats also 40% more powerful than my 6amp Freud.

      [ 06-03-2005, 09:01 AM: Message edited by: BadgerDave ]
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        I have not seen them in person, just what i showed you folks on the web page, but they sure do look sweet!
        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

        Comment


        • #5
          Why does everyone get wrapped up in amps? If you guess dont know how amps are rated, Im going to tell you. Amps is a UL heat rise. Every tool has to be UL tested before it can go on the market. Every amprage has a certain tempature it can not exceed. Any manafacture can put any number they want on it, as long as it doesnt exceed that tempature for that amprage, it passes the test. If it exceeds the temp, it has to go back for redesigning.

          More air flow means more power in a motor.
          In most case's in other brands, there isnt enough air flow so that means not that good of a motor.

          Now to answer the post forum question, I will take my Makita 4340FCT over any others. And Mine has a 6.3 amps in case you are wondering!

          Comment


          • #6
            well well well now lets talk about amps shall we.frist of all i have a 1965 porter cable model 315 cirular saw that only pulls 11.5 amps, and compared with all the 15 amp saws out there i will have to say it cuts smoother than most of todays saws including the ridgid witch is all most as powerful but amps is not heat 100 watts = 1 amp 200 watts =2 anps and so on so if you have a tool that has 6 amps it will pull 600 watts at start up and at bind(means the motor can not turn due to pinch)if you have a 11 amp saw vs a 15 saw the 15 should be more powerful but some times that is not the case. here is why bearing are better than bushings gear ratios (yes all saws have gears in them peroid!)and to what tolrances is every thing made to has alot to play in there also yes the more amps the more heat but air flow the way you said it packer is more if not competly for a car or truck motors not a power tool
            9/11/01, never forget.

            Comment


            • #7
              Not so slow after all. LOL
              info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

              Comment


              • #8
                Amps are a measure of current. The more amps, the more power a motor can produce. Think of it in terms of a current of water pushing a water wheel. It is the same concept. The wheel will not turn fast unless there is a large enough flow of water.
                www.TheWoodCellar.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  You hit the nail right on the head. the more amps the more power, of course gearing has a lot to do with that as well
                  \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Spacebluesonoma, Thanks that was good info.

                    Regarding the folowing,

                    "More air flow means more power in a motor"

                    That comment can sometimes be accurate in an internal combustion engine (though not always). An engine is not the same as a motor though the two words are often used to describe each other. You often have a few motors bolted to the side of an engine (alternators, starters, winches ect.)but there are seldom any engines bolted to the side of a motor except perhaps on utility generators.

                    Thank you Old Slow Chevy. That formula just gave the answer to a question regarding a generator I had been considering. To power a 75 amp welder I better get one that has the capability to run 7500 watts continuously and not just at peak. It very easily told me I need a bigger one.

                    Packers, You wrote;
                    "In most case's in other brands, there isnt enough air flow so that means not that good of a motor."

                    Please explain.
                    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      GUYS, DON'T KNOW WHERE YOU GET YOUR ELECTRICAL INFO FROM BUT IT CERTANLY ISN'T FROM OHMS LAW.
                      AMPS IS EQUAL TO WATTS DIVIDED BY VOLTAGE.
                      OLDSLOWCHEVY, THE WAY YOU EXPLAINED IT WORKS IF YOUR VOLTAGE IS 100 VOLTS. MAYBE THATS WHY THE CHEVY IS SLOW? WE USE 120 VOLTS AS OUR STANDARD. I'VE CHECKED MANY PUMPS WITH AN ACCURATE METER TO PROVE THIS. AS FAR AS START UP AMPS. UNDER LOAD AT START UP EXPECT UP TO 3 TIMES THE AMPERAGE OF RUNNING. TOOLS SUCH AS AN AIR COMPRESSORS ARE A PRIME EXAMPLE OF THIS. CIRCUIT BREAKERS WILL ALLOW FOR EXCESS AMP DRAW FOR A SHORT PERIOD. TRUE THE MORE POWER, THE MORE HEAT. BUT AMPS ARE STILL A UNIT OF MEASUREMENT BASED ON WATTAGE DIVIDED BY VOLTS.
                      1 HORSEPOWER IS RATED AT 752 WATTS.

                      MIGHT BE A PLUMBER, BUT THIS IS BASIC ELECTRICAL FORMULAS.
                      RICK

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I do like the Bosch 1590 EVS jig saws, so much that I own two of them. Now that's 6.3 amps each, times 2 equals 12.6 amps,
                        still more than the average

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK:

                          1 HORSEPOWER IS RATED AT 752 WATTS.
                          Close ... 1HP = 746 Watts
                          Everything else is right on.
                          You can substite other variables in your calculations as well depending on what variables you know.
                          Volts = Amps X Resistance
                          Power(Watts) = Volts X Amps
                          which gives you fomula like
                          Power = AmpsĀ² X Resistance ETC

                          [ 06-23-2005, 07:10 AM: Message edited by: wbrooks ]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            THANKS WBROOKS. I WAS CLOSE BUT TOO MUCH TRIVIAL INFO IN MY HEAD.
                            WATER AND POWER DON'T MIX. TEST ME ON PLUMBING.
                            THANKS AGAIN FOR PUTTING A SECOND ON THIS THREAD.
                            RICK

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thank you gentlemen. Too often I just call an electrical engineer and ask, will this work? or What needs to be done to make it work? When can you send someone over?

                              When one gets too many rolodex cards its easy to get lazy.
                              Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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