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  • 18v Ridgid drill keyless chuck question

    Hi all,

    I have an 18V Ridgid drill, and I'm very happy with it...except for the chuck. I know there have been numerous posts about the chuck, but the ones I've looked at were a) old, and b) generally mentioned a wobble issue.

    My issue with the chuck isn't a wobble, but rather the jaws tend to keep losing the bit! Is it normal for the chuck to lose its grip on the bits after a few seconds of drilling? It seems like half my time is spent stopping, resetting the bit in the chuck, tightening it, and then starting again...only to have the bit fall out a few seconds later. I've heard that keyless chucks in general aren't quite as good as keyed chucks, but this seems a bit extreme.

    I'm just doing simple woodworking stuff, normal bits, etc. I'm no long-time expert with these types of tools, so maybe some of the more experienced folks would be kind enough to weigh in...am I expecting too much? Can I replace the stock chuck with a different (better?) keyless chuck, and would that void my warranty/LSA with Ridgid?

    Just trying to find out some options here....

    Thanks,
    Dave

  • #2
    I've not had that specific problem but if your are tightening the chuck as much as it's possible too. then take it back to HD or to a service center to replace the chuck.
    "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
    "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

    Comment


    • #3
      If i am not mistaken when you tighten the chuck it has a locking mechanism if you donot hear a click when tightening then it is defective. i do not no ridgids policy on chuck replacement. i would take it to a service center. maybe they can put a different chuck,most of the chucks on the cordless are jacobs besides the bosch and a handfull of others that use rhome chucks.I usually replace chucks with the milw. loc-tor chuck or a all metal dewalt chuck(both are jacobs)..
      A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

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      • #4
        yep, I do hear a click when it "locks" into place. It does work, it's not defective as far as I can see...if anything, it just seems like it's just not a very good chuck.

        Which leaves me with the question--if I replace the chuck (made of plastic) with a really high-quality keyless metal chuck, does that do anything to my Ridgid warranty/LSA?

        Comment


        • #5
          Replacing the chuck yourself may effect the LSA, I'd wait for the chuck to give up and get it replaced or just take it in and tell the people at the service center your problem. If the chuck keeps loosening itself then it is worn and According the the LSA as I understand it is covered but, don't do it yourself.
          "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
          "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

          Comment


          • #6
            How tight is tight?

            Do you have it set on one of the higher torque settings when you tighten it? You should.
            Lorax
            "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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            • #7
              Do you have it set on one of the higher torque settings when you tighten it? You should.
              Eh? Do you mean when I insert a bit, I should set the speed switch on the top of the drill to "1" and the torque knob to a high number like 22? How does that affect the chuck's ability to hold onto the bit when I tighten it?

              If you tell me the answer is in the manual, I'm going to hit myself on the head with the drill! I'm going to go look again now, just to make sure I RTFM'ed....

              {EDIT} OK, I just looked in the manual...it doesn't mention anything about putting the drill on a high-torque setting when changing bits and tightening the chuck....
              Last edited by canadave; 02-28-2006, 04:07 AM.

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              • #8
                Eh?

                The higher the torque setting, the tighter the chuck grips the bit. I wouldn't try 22 though. that might hurt, eh? Try 14-16.
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                Comment


                • #9
                  Oh, I see what you're saying now. The thing is, though, I see bit slippage even at high torque settings like 22.

                  From reading other posts in other forums discussing keyless chucks, they seem to be just not as good as regular keyed chucks in terms of gripping the bit. I guess I'd just like a sense from you other folks as to how often you find your bits slipping on your Ridgid cordless drills....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    the better chucks have carbide inserts that bite into the bits. try a hex type drill bit shank. these are much faster to chuck and grip much better.

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [quote=canadave]Oh, I see what you're saying now. The thing is, though, I see bit slippage even at high torque settings like 22. quote]

                      Do you have it set at 22 when you are holding the chuck to tighten it, or just when you are running it?
                      I have a Craftsman 19.2 volt and very seldom have a bit slip.
                      Lorax
                      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                      • #12
                        Do you have it set at 22 when you are holding the chuck to tighten it, or just when you are running it?
                        Well, I assumed you meant when running it....but I've also replaced bits while it was set at a high setting like 22, and it didn't seem to make a difference.

                        I have a Craftsman 19.2 volt and very seldom have a bit slip.
                        Interesting...in a way I'm glad to hear that, because I wasn't sure if it was just my inexperience with this sort of thing, and maybe I was overestimating how secure the bit should be in the chuck. But I think I'll take Plumber Rick's advice and see if I can't improve the situation.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Also, if you have had it less than 90 days you could take it back to HD and get a new one.
                          Lorax
                          "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Take it back,tell them it slips and it is unacceptable.
                            A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As plumber Rick said about hex bits they do hold the best! I just wana add that I use my gun mostley as a driver and poilet holes, if I aint got my hex bits seated in the chuck right they fall out every time. and that aint no fun up a ladder and lose your bit in the snow or grass. I find my self with my drill (and this is just the one I own) I'll always slow down and seat my bits in solid, and dont have any proulbms with fall out.
                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                              Be safe out there folks
                              Bob B
                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

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