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My router table mounting idea..

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  • My router table mounting idea..

    I decided today that I was finally going to build a new router extension table for my TS3650. I reviewed the many ideas out here for mounting an extension and came up with my own idea. I don't think this has been tried yet, so let me know what you think.

    My idea is to use the opening on the existing table wing as a mounting surface. I purchased several peices of angle iron and a 3/16" thick peice of flat steel. I counter sunk a couple holes into the steel and used 5/16-18 x 1 1/2" machine screws to attach two peice of angle iron. These screws brace the angle iron against the inside and outside edges of the table wing. On the outside edge of the table wing, I drilled three holes to allow for 5/16-18 x 1" screws. To this end, I attached a peice of angle iron that has holes on both sides. The bottom side of the angle iron has holes to fasten the bottom angle iron peices.

    Tomorrow I plan to complete the table surface and attach it to the protruding angle iron peices. I have a few of barrel nuts that will screw into the bottom of the router table and allow mounting bolts to attach it to the holes you see in the angle iron.

    IMO, this is pretty solid and may not require any further bracing. I'll let you know after I finish it tomorrow....






  • #2
    Oh, by counter sinking the machine screw holes, I have insured that nothing protrudes above the table surface. I'm still thinking about different methods to cover this bar up for a better appearance.

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    • #3
      Correct me if I am wrong but isn't ALL the weight of the existing CI table saw wing; the new angle iron to support the router table; AND the router table PLUS the weight of the router hanging off those couple small bolts that attach the TS Wing to the Table Saw? Oh, and the rails will have some of the load too right, but most of it will be on those couple bolts.

      I think you should consider some legs down to the floor or bracing back to the TS of some type. Don't forget to add the weight of the wood you will be working and some value for the downforce you will apply with your hands while passing the wood across the table. Whoops, almost forgot, add in the weight of the fence system, featherboards, etc.

      I put diagonal braces on mine, because I thought I would be moving the TS around more than I have. It has remained in pretty much the same spot for the past year, so I may change my braces to a pair of legs that run down the the floor with some height adjustment of course. You can see the braces I used in my thread about an outfeed table for the TS-3650, there are a number of photos in that thread.

      Other than that I don't see why your design won't work.
      "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
      John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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      • #4
        Yea, I saw the pics. Nifty idea.

        I wasn't thinking about any weight on the rails because they are supported by the cast iron wing. I was thinking of mounting my table just like Alexc2323 has done, But now that you mention it, that does put more load on those four bolts holding the CI wing. I can upgrade the bolts, but the CI table could still become a point of failure and allow some flex against the rails....

        So now that I give it some thought, I think I will go with supports like the ones you made. My question is where did you get the adjustable supports? It looks like a couple peice of extruded alluminum but I can't figure out the locking mechanism. Are there any locking pins in those supports?

        Thanks for the input.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sgt Beavis
          Yea, I saw the pics. Nifty idea.

          I wasn't thinking about any weight on the rails because they are supported by the cast iron wing. I was thinking of mounting my table just like Alexc2323 has done, But now that you mention it, that does put more load on those four bolts holding the CI wing. I can upgrade the bolts, but the CI table could still become a point of failure and allow some flex against the rails....

          So now that I give it some thought, I think I will go with supports like the ones you made. My question is where did you get the adjustable supports? It looks like a couple peice of extruded alluminum but I can't figure out the locking mechanism. Are there any locking pins in those supports?

          Thanks for the input.
          What adjustable supports are you talking about? i didn't see any in the pictures above.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sgt Beavis and sandking, the answer to both your questions can be found here on similar thread Bob D. started a while back:

            http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...=outfeed+table

            Sandking, the adjustable leg supports are shown in Bob's pictures.

            Sgt Beavis, I believe he mentioned that he bought them at a flea market or something and they are adjustable security bars for sliding doors. I have seen them at HD for about $12 each.

            I was very close to following something similar to what Bob made, but now unfortunately all woodworking plans are on hold pending a potential move and getting my house ready to sell.

            WWS
            Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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            • #7
              WWS is correct in that I bought the sliding patio door security locking bars at a flea market. They are about 10 or $12 in the hardware store or HD or Lowes if they have them. I think they were made by Franklin Hardware or some name like that. but anyway I got them cheap. The friction clamp that these things have on them does not work well for this application which of course is NOT their intended function, so don't waste time trying to figure that out or duplicate it.

              It would not be too hard to make your own of similar design. Get two pieces of round or square tube of sizes that one will slide inside the other, let's say something like 1" and 3/4" round aluminum tubing with about a 1/16" wall thickness. A little slop will not hurt that much, what I mean is they do not need to be a snug fit. If you have a difference of 1/16" or thereabouts between the OD of the smaller piece and the ID of the larger piece it will not hurt. cut the larger diameter piece to be about 6" shorter than the distance you need to cover. Cut the smaller diameter piece to this same length. this means they will be roughly 85% engaged when you extend them to cover the needed distance. In the side of the larger tube, drill and tap a hole for the thumbscrew (something like the 't' is the sketch below). Put a rubber furniture leg cap over the one end, and use a couple short pieces of 1"x1"x1/8" aluminum angle to make a couple brackets. Cross drill the top end of the larger tube, and drill the angles to match so a bolt can be passed through all three pieces. On the opposite leg of the angle drill one or two holes for your mounting screws.


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              Last edited by Bob D.; 03-10-2006, 08:26 PM.
              "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
              John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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