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  • Wheel barrel compressor

    Have been recently looking into Ridgid's model (sold at HD) but unable to find any user reviews.

    Anyone here have one, care to comment. I would be using it to do general construction work, primarily framing unless I'm able to find other uses for it.

    Thanks

  • #2
    do you want the eletic or gas powered one i want to know about the eletric one my self
    9/11/01, never forget.

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    • #3
      gas compressor

      I'm trying to avoid having too much power tools running at once, since this sometimes happens more interested in the gas.

      Is 10scfm @90psi enough to spray paint a residential home 1800-2000sqft. I'm not a painter but if the opportunity came up would give it a go. This would be my only other use if not using to build.

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      • #4
        more than enough for most sparyers
        9/11/01, never forget.

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        • #5
          don't paint a house with air

          Don't try to paint a house with air. To much time, to much overspray. If you need to spray a house, rent (or buy) an airless (no not the little cheap things, a reall pressure pump airless).

          If you are painting the inside of an existing house, generally a roller is faster. To much time spent masking floors, cabinets, etc. We have done it in some situations, but usually not.

          Painting the exterior works fine with an airless.

          I have two portable compressors that I use on the jobsite. If I'm spraying lacquer on doors, I use an HVLP spray gun (like the ones they use to paint cars) and join both compressors with a short hose. Otherwise there is to much pressure loss and a lot of downtime waiting for the compressors to build up.

          A single larger compressor would do the trick, but for what I do, it's more than I generally need. The bigger the compressor, the more work loading and unloading. At my age (55) that's an issue. The pancake compressor is allways in the truck and the wheelbarrow comes out only on the rare occasion that I need it.

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          • #6
            Thanks bigthom and chevy

            Obviously, not making a living painting here but if I get a chance to use the airless sprayer who knows.

            Thanks again.
            Last edited by tkholck; 04-08-2006, 04:11 AM.

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            • #7
              I haven't sprayed interiors with an airless, but I have sprayed exteriors (wood siding). Even with the airless, it still required backrolling to really get down into the rough surface, small weather cracks,etc. By the way, some of the best airless units (Grayco, Devilbiss, etc) are pneumatic, so your compressor should drive those okay.
              Practicing at practical wood working

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              • #8
                Air-LESS

                Airless sprayers don't use air. An airless sprayer pumps paint only through a hose under high pressure. The spray tip atomizes the paint. Air is not used as a propellant.

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                • #9
                  I did not mean that air was used to spray the paint, although they do make air-assist airless that uses additional atomizing air (I've been using them to paint acft for the past 8 years). I was referring to the power for the compression pump for the paint. There are electric powered and air powered. The pneumatic ones use air to drive a piston which gives the high pressure to the paint. A single stage pneumatic pump delivers approximately a 15:1- 18:1 ratio (100 psi input = 1500/1800 PSI on the paint) . A dual stage can go as high as 30:1. Sorry I did not make that clear.
                  Practicing at practical wood working

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BigThom
                    Don't try to paint a house with air. To much time, to much overspray. If you need to spray a house, rent (or buy) an airless (no not the little cheap things, a reall pressure pump airless).

                    If you are painting the inside of an existing house, generally a roller is faster. To much time spent masking floors, cabinets, etc. We have done it in some situations, but usually not.

                    Painting the exterior works fine with an airless.

                    I have two portable compressors that I use on the jobsite. If I'm spraying lacquer on doors, I use an HVLP spray gun (like the ones they use to paint cars) and join both compressors with a short hose. Otherwise there is to much pressure loss and a lot of downtime waiting for the compressors to build up.

                    A single larger compressor would do the trick, but for what I do, it's more than I generally need. The bigger the compressor, the more work loading and unloading. At my age (55) that's an issue. The pancake compressor is allways in the truck and the wheelbarrow comes out only on the rare occasion that I need it.
                    Totally agreed.

                    I was a house painter years ago before I got into the plumbing trades.

                    Airless is the only way to go with exterior painting. I don't know of a single painting contractor who uses an air compressor except DIY'ers.

                    Interior, it's a toss up. If it's a large house, with no carpet laid yet and nothing else but cabinets and windows, etc, to mask, it's sometimes better to spray it all out and do a quick backroll. But on smaller homes or apartments, roll and brush is just as fast and alot less PITA, especially with clean-up, machine wear and tear and clean-up, masking, costs of masking (The blue 3M masking tape is EXPENSIVE!)
                    Last edited by AZPlumber; 04-08-2006, 04:18 PM.

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