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14.4 impact driver - actual torque

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  • #16
    Re: 14.4 impact driver - actual torque

    Originally posted by Clynne View Post
    Hi Norsac,

    You may want to have the torque tested by a Calibration Lab to double check it's torque settings. When they test your torque they may be able to detect what's wrong with your tool and make recommendations on how to fix it or send it back to the manufacturer if it's under warranty.

    You can check this company's link I've listed below. They offer tool repair and calibration. They may be able to help you diagnose the problem over the phone. Good luck!

    http://www.flexibleassembly.com/Service-Calibration-Tab
    Clynne........Welcome to the forum and thanks for your input, however you are responding to a thread from 2006.....Ray

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    • #17
      Re: 14.4 impact driver - actual torque

      I have the 14.4 volt impact driver. I would charge the battery and try again. I did not have any problems with mine. I have driven a pile of screws and never had any issues. The impact I purchased was in a hard case and came with one battery and charger. I went out and got 2 of the larger batteries. 2.5 amp? I have put 1000s of screw in now and have never looked back. I perfer the 14.4 over the 18 volt or the friends 18/24 select volt driver. in my personal opinion the 14.4 volt is jsut a better driver.
      If you donot think it is working up to the standards take it back to home depot and get them to replace it.
      Easy as that

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      • #18
        Re: 14.4 impact driver - actual torque

        Originally posted by Clynne View Post
        Hi Norsac,

        You may want to have the torque tested by a Calibration Lab to double check it's torque settings. When they test your torque they may be able to detect what's wrong with your tool and make recommendations on how to fix it or send it back to the manufacturer if it's under warranty.

        You can check this company's link I've listed below. They offer tool repair and calibration. They may be able to help you diagnose the problem over the phone. Good luck!

        http://www.flexibleassembly.com/Service-Calibration-Tab
        I wonder if this is a potential spam, due to the link, and the response to a 3-year old question.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: 14.4 impact driver - actual torque

          Originally posted by stuart_canada View Post
          I have the 14.4 volt impact driver. I would charge the battery and try again. I did not have any problems with mine. I have driven a pile of screws and never had any issues. The impact I purchased was in a hard case and came with one battery and charger. I went out and got 2 of the larger batteries. 2.5 amp? I have put 1000s of screw in now and have never looked back. I perfer the 14.4 over the 18 volt or the friends 18/24 select volt driver. in my personal opinion the 14.4 volt is jsut a better driver.
          If you donot think it is working up to the standards take it back to home depot and get them to replace it.
          Easy as that
          A little late for the OP to return it. This is a 3-year-old thread that was re-awoken.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: 14.4 impact driver - actual torque

            Originally posted by nosrac View Post
            My wife recently purchased a 14.4 ridgid impact driver for me from HD. Sweet gal!

            My question - it shows a 1400 in/lb torque rating, which would convert over to approx 116 ft/lb.

            The one I have is lucky to turn 45-50 ft/lb max.

            Did I get a bad one?
            Will it get stronger once the battery cycles through a few times?
            Is the torque rating somehow applied differently to these types of drivers?

            Thanks in advance,
            Nosrac
            Manufacturers test impact drivers by driving a lag into the material until it stops moving and then use a torque wrench to unscrew it and thus measure the torque. This is how Hilti does it. Some less honest manufacturers like Ridgid and Makita use electronic torque testers which allow the hammer to go to full speed with no load and then do a complete stop of the spindle allowing the hammer hit the anvil at full force. This is how they gain bogus numbers. The problem with this is in real applications hammer does not return to full speed after the impact, there is a certain recovery time and the deeper the lag goes into the material, the shorter it is, so the average kinetic energy of the hammer drops. The deeper the lag the more frequently you hear the impacts.

            These are 2 methods - soft joint and hard joint. Hard joint test is the "bogus" test which gives inflated numbers, where fastener is moving no more than 30 degrees before it stops. Soft joint test allows the fastener to do several turns before reaching max torque.

            And like HVAC HAWK said, by deep-cycling (deep draining) your batteries you actually damage them. Several dozen deep cycles will cost you 30% capacity loss.

            Comment

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