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Ridgid 24V Lithium Tools

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  • #46
    Is the Milwaukee charger record success charge cycles? Or it just record how many times that the battery connected to charger! May someone try to connect the battery to the charger for 2,000 times and send to service station and see whether it is truth......Just wonder what conditions for Milwaukee counting the 2,000 cycles.
    Last edited by Battery Guy; 07-29-2006, 11:27 AM.

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    • #47
      Battery Guy, - good question on the charge cycle numbers. I do not want to be the one who finds out the hard way. However I have always heard that you should leave the battery on for the full charge whenever possible. Doing a quick 5 minute charge to finish the day won't hurt the battery, but will count as a charge cycle am sure. The Nice thing about the Milwaukee 28 Volt batteries is that the warranty does start until the first time you charge the battery, regardless of the date of purchase. They are supposed to come out with a battery reader for all of their authorized service centers that will be able to tell you how many time the battery was charged and when it was first charged to start the warranty. I have held back on charging two of my five 28 volt batteries as long as possible to delay the warranty start date.
      Unless you are the lead Dog, the scenery does not change...

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      • #48
        Originally posted by bjrenn
        Everyone can sneak a peek at the Ridgid 24v Li-ion tools in the July 2006 PM magazine. They list the set @ $599, and I think the new feature, as discussed in the article is the "fuel gauge" - similar to the new Milwaukee Li-ion batteries. Everyone should read the article and reply to the thread that I posted in the "Give Us Your Tool Ideas" forum. Hope this helps....

        Can you guys tell me what the going price for the Ridgid 24V tools (R932) are in the states? I'm up in Canada, and I'm deciding whether I should buy 'em up here, or down there.

        Thanks.

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        • #49
          down here they are around $650 i think but please don't quote me on that
          9/11/01, never forget.

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          • #50
            One last question before I take the plunge on these tools. Does anyone owning them not like them? I haven't seen too many reviews on these tools yet. I'm particularly concerned about the "plastic" looking base on the new circ. saw.

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            • #51
              it is a composite material that will bend like aluminum base used by some tool companies or break it you drop it. Carbon fiber I believe I may be mistaken. ANyway it is definitely not plastic. Also it has an rpm rating of 3900 RPMs thats only 100RPMs less than that yellow 36v. Also from my experience using it during demos in store having the blade on the right side is very convienent and easier to use.

              Also the new Max Select tools are on the site but what is up with the recip saw description did not get excited while typing and double type everything.
              Last edited by RedBaron; 09-17-2006, 03:05 PM.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by RedBaron
                it is a composite material that will bend like aluminum base used by some tool companies or break it you drop it. Carbon fiber I believe I may be mistaken. ANyway it is definitely not plastic. Also it has an rpm rating of 3900 RPMs thats only 100RPMs less than that yellow 36v. Also from my experience using it during demos in store having the blade on the right side is very convienent and easier to use.

                Also the new Max Select tools are on the site but what is up with the recip saw description did not get excited while typing and double type everything.
                RedBaron-

                I'd really like to hear what some guys who own this have to say about it. When I looked at it, I definitely didn't think it was Carbon Fiber (I could of course be wrong). It just seemed pretty flexy to me. It's making me lean towards the new Milwaukee 18v lithium instead, or even Ridgid's old 18v 5piece if they came out with lithium batteries (I hate the recip saw in that one though).

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Paladin2025
                  RedBaron-

                  I'd really like to hear what some guys who own this have to say about it. When I looked at it, I definitely didn't think it was Carbon Fiber (I could of course be wrong). It just seemed pretty flexy to me.
                  It's some sort of composite plastic. It's not carbon fiber for several reasons, number one being cost. A realy carbon plate would cost more than the saw. CF is also an extremely stiff material, you would not feel any flex. Lastly CF is NOT suited for that application. It is highly prone to failure due to impact and doesn't take well to being scraped over things like a baseplate sliding over a piece of wood.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Paladin2025
                    RedBaron-
                    It's making me lean towards the new Milwaukee 18v lithium instead, or even Ridgid's old 18v 5piece if they came out with lithium batteries (I hate the recip saw in that one though).
                    Why not also consider Makita's LXT line? They specifically redesigned all their 18v tools for their new 18v Lithium batteries and weigh about the same as 12v tools. I've been eyeing those tools out for a long time. Seems to me makita was the only one to get a clue when it comes to lithium and do what many people really want. A lot of people don't want anything more than 18v. They want 18v that is lighter and smaller! I checked out Ridgids 24v and the MilwaukeeV28 and while I did like the weight, the honking massize size of the batteries really turned me off. Dewalt did the same with huge 36v batteries although I will probably end up going that route with the saws simply because they are the first cordless tools to really offer power that can rival that of a corded tool.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Velosapien
                      Why not also consider Makita's LXT line? They specifically redesigned all their 18v tools for their new 18v Lithium batteries and weigh about the same as 12v tools. I've been eyeing those tools out for a long time. Seems to me makita was the only one to get a clue when it comes to lithium and do what many people really want. A lot of people don't want anything more than 18v. They want 18v that is lighter and smaller! I checked out Ridgids 24v and the MilwaukeeV28 and while I did like the weight, the honking massize size of the batteries really turned me off. Dewalt did the same with huge 36v batteries although I will probably end up going that route with the saws simply because they are the first cordless tools to really offer power that can rival that of a corded tool.
                      Velosapien-
                      Yes, I looked at them too. They're a little pricey in Canada. Their 18v system is more expensive than the Milwaukee, or Ridgid's 24v system. What I didn't like about them is that they didn't feel as well made as the Milwaukee, or Ridgid tools.

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                      • #56
                        We had a bad experience with the Makitas batteries getting hot. I believe this is why they put a fan on the charger. I have always been told that heat will take down a battery quickly. Just another note: makita lithium batteries do not fit an their old tools, so you will need to buy all new tools if you want lithium Makita. I have not seen Milwaukee's lithium (18 volt) but I heard that you will be able to put them on any of their 18 volt tools. You are right about Dewalt 36 volt Lithium are too big and bulky.
                        Unless you are the lead Dog, the scenery does not change...

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Dawg
                          We had a bad experience with the Makitas batteries getting hot. I believe this is why they put a fan on the charger. I have always been told that heat will take down a battery quickly. Just another note: makita lithium batteries do not fit an their old tools, so you will need to buy all new tools if you want lithium Makita. I have not seen Milwaukee's lithium (18 volt) but I heard that you will be able to put them on any of their 18 volt tools. You are right about Dewalt 36 volt Lithium are too big and bulky.
                          No, the Makita batteries will not fit their older tools but that was sort of the point. They built their 18v Li-Ion tools from the ground up specifically to optimize them for the new technology. The specs for the newer tools are much better than their older parts. Merely building new batteries for the old tools would not improve the performance, just life and weight. I didn't know about the heat problem, although I have to wonder if not all Li-Ion batteries would suffer from the same problem under extended use. Its the price to be paid for packing so much energy into a small space (as the exploding Li-iom laptop batteries of late have proven ). Dewalts Li-Ion batteries are pretty huge, although I have not compared them side to side with the V28 batteries and the Ridgid 24v which to me seemed equally monstrous in size. At least they still do weigh less than their standard 18v batteries and if they can compensate for their size with significantly increased power output, they might just be my next cordless purchase.

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                          • #58
                            One might be tempted to ooogle and awe over the so called "560in-lbs" of the Makita LXT drill, but they achieved that torque by gearing it down to 300RPM not by increasing the motor power. You can take any DeWalt or Milwaukee drill, say, and gear it down to 200RPM and your torque will be up to 6-700 in-lbs. Big friggin' deal. You're getting more torque at the expense of a much slower drilling speed.

                            The torque ratings are a marketing sham. It's all about the "bigger number" that they want you the buyer to latch on to in the store at the nice shiny display shelf.

                            When they say marketing shamisms like "Makita-built from the ground up", it's total BS. In fact, Makita had a NiMh drill that was identical to the LXT in spec. I think it was the "MXT". lol Basically the same design, different battery.

                            Originally posted by Velosapien
                            No, the Makita batteries will not fit their older tools but that was sort of the point. They built their 18v Li-Ion tools from the ground up specifically to optimize them for the new technology. The specs for the newer tools are much better than their older parts. Merely building new batteries for the old tools would not improve the performance, just life and weight. I didn't know about the heat problem, although I have to wonder if not all Li-Ion batteries would suffer from the same problem under extended use. Its the price to be paid for packing so much energy into a small space (as the exploding Li-iom laptop batteries of late have proven ). Dewalts Li-Ion batteries are pretty huge, although I have not compared them side to side with the V28 batteries and the Ridgid 24v which to me seemed equally monstrous in size. At least they still do weigh less than their standard 18v batteries and if they can compensate for their size with significantly increased power output, they might just be my next cordless purchase.

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                            • #59
                              Actually makita updated their NiMH drills to match up all the LXT's specs. Its pretty much identical except for the shell. I am aware of torque being a pretty useless unit of measure and the slow 300rpm speed they achieved it with but even so their older NiMH units seemed a bit substandard IMO in performance compared to the competition. I think the real key to the LXT was that it brought a wider selection of tools that are likely to be more useful based merely on the extended battery life rather than any increase in power. I might understand why they did it (beisdes making you buy another tool). Merely making retrofitable batteries might mean people might use the older batteries in tools that will drain them too fast like 18v rotary hammers, giving a bad impression. Eh, anyway, what do I care. My 18v dewalt tools still suit me just fine and I have no real intention of replacing them.

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                              • #60
                                That's right Makita don't care about having the biggest tools on the block which is maybe a good strategy for them to play. They're banking on the fact that 18V is good enough for what a contractor does probably 90% of the time. From what I hear Makita LXT is selling pretty well, probably better than V28 or the others.

                                As far as 36V being bulky.. everything over 18V is "bulky" so to speak, so is V28 and XLI bulky actually. you don't buy them if you're looking for a compact lightweight tool for screwing in electrical outlet covers. DeWalt's 36V is IMO the best high powered cordless on the market now. Milwaukee is okay, but they kind of botched because their circ saw is only 6 1/2".. Milwaukee tried to make a 7 1/4 but said it performed too much like an 18V saw, so they had to back it off. DeWalt are probably the only ones right now that can claim real corded performance.

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