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aren't 'Surface Planers' & 'Thickness Planers' one & the same?

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  • aren't 'Surface Planers' & 'Thickness Planers' one & the same?

    I recently purchased a TP1300, and the main purpose for it was in being able to buy 'raw' boards and dress them myself; saving myself a few dollars with that process. But I read, somewhere, that the above mentioned task is best served by a 'Surface Planer'. I had, previously, thought that surface planers & thickness planers were just different terms for the same type of machine.
    ~Blessings~

    Nathan

  • #2
    As far as I know the two terms are interchangeable. The tools are planers, how the mfg. chooses to describe them is up to them. For instance, Ridgid calls theirs a thickness planer while Delta labels the 22-580 a finishing planer.
    ================================================== ====
    All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BadgerDave
      As far as I know the two terms are interchangeable. The tools are planers, how the mfg. chooses to describe them is up to them. For instance, Ridgid calls theirs a thickness planer while Delta labels the 22-580 a finishing planer.
      Thanks, BadgerDave ~

      The reason that I questioned such, is because of what I had read in the Rigid TP1300 owner's manual. On page 16 - under the PLANING section, it states as followed: 'Thickness Planers work best if at least one side of the work piece has a flat surface. Use a Surface planer or jointer first to define the initial flat surface'.

      Now, maybe I am reading something into it that really isn't there - but it sounds to me as if references are being made to two different type of 'planers'. This is not a super biggie to me, because there will always be a place the thickness planer in my shop. I just hope that I will be able to utilize it for the initial intended purpose.
      Last edited by NLAlston; 05-28-2006, 12:02 AM.
      ~Blessings~

      Nathan

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      • #4
        I couldn't google any technical definitions, so this is JMHO.

        Thickness planer = Planer

        Surface planer = Jointer (often referred to as a jointer/planer)
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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        • #5
          Originally posted by NLAlston
          Thanks, BadgerDave ~

          The reason that I questioned such, is because of what I had read in the Rigid TP1300 owner's manual. On page 16 - under the PLANING section, it states as followed: 'Thickness Planers work best if at least one side of the work piece has a flat surface. Use a Surface planer or jointer first to define the initial flat surface'.

          Now, maybe I am reading something into it that really isn't there - but it sounds to me as if references are being made to two different type of 'planers'. This is not a super biggie to me, because there will always be a place the thickness planer in my shop. I just hope that I will be able to utilize it for the initial intended purpose.
          Don't read more into it than is there. The TP1300 will do what you want as far as smoothing out and thicknessing your rough boards. I have been using mine for several years and don't own a jointer. I use a straight edge and router with flush trim bit to edge joint boards.
          info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by papadan
            Don't read more into it than is there. The TP1300 will do what you want as far as smoothing out and thicknessing your rough boards. I have been using mine for several years and don't own a jointer. I use a straight edge and router with flush trim bit to edge joint boards.
            But dont miss the point they are trying to make. I you have rough stock you both a jointer and a planner. The jointer is used to set one side and edge flat and perpendicular. The planer will flatten the other side relative to the flat jointed side.

            Point being, you need both tools.
            --<br />Darrell

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Darrell
              But dont miss the point they are trying to make. I you have rough stock you both a jointer and a planner. The jointer is used to set one side and edge flat and perpendicular. The planer will flatten the other side relative to the flat jointed side.

              Point being, you need both tools.
              Thanks, Darrel. As it turns out, I do have an old Shopsmith Jointer - though it needs blade changing, and the securing bolts appear to be seized up in the blade housing. It has a 4" wide bed, which isn't all that great, but it will serve a purpose (when I can get it operational).
              ~Blessings~

              Nathan

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