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  • Bosch Blue Granite Drill Bits

    I'm looking to buy some drill bits for use with my hammer drill. On paper, the Bosch Carbide BlueGranite bits sound pretty good. Anyone here have experience with these bits that they'd care to share? TIA.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.


  • #2
    I have used the blue granites and I like them a lot. They work better than most other ones I have used (unsure what else I have bought nothing but blue granite for the past few years)
    Colorado Deck and Framing - When perfection is demanded

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    • #3
      Dave

      I recently decided I needed to upgrade my elcheapo hammer drill bits and looked for a small assortment set that wouldn’t break the bank. I was going to get the Bosch one HD sells but decided to try the six-piece Milwaukee set that Coastal Tools sells. I have yet to try them, so I cannot comment on their quality. I did purchase one ¾” blue granite bit that I used to drill through my basement wall into the garage. It took a lot of drilling but I believe it was do to the antiquated and underpowered hammer drill that I had borrowed; the bit appears to be in great shape.

      Woodslayer

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      • #4
        Used these bits a number of times in prestressed products and had great performance. Never had to stop midway and change a bit. Recommend them in a minute.

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        • #5
          Thanks for all the helpful info everyone. It looks like Bosch it is.
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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          • #6
            I recently got to try out my remanufactured R5010 Ridgid Hammer Drill and those Milwaukee Bits I referred to earlier in this post, I don’t know which one to give the credit to or a combination of both but I could not believe drilling in concrete could be that easy. What a difference the proper equipment makes.

            Woodslayer

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            • #7
              Rotary Hammer

              If you liked hammer drills and bits, wait til you try a rotary hammer. Talk about a horse of a different color. You're really going to love it. Slower slower speeds, fewer impacts, but much harder hitting overall and will burrow through concrete like it's cutting butter. Rent one at a GOOD rental shop first before you buy. They should have something like a really good Bosch or even Hitachi rotary hammer with can power through just about anything.
              JimDon

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              • #8
                Jimdon, absolutely agree. Had a chance to rent a big Bosch to break up a patio door exit curb and it ate through the slab like butter. I got to use another bosch to punch holes for my AC unit and it made 1" holes through 8" of wall like butter, awesome tools for heavy work, nothing like a hammer drill.

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                • #9
                  I've tried the bosch bits and they're ok but they normaly would be my first choice. They always seem to be fairly more expensive and I haven't found them to perform any better than others. I typicaly use a brand called Relton mainly because a local store carried them and they have proved super durable. I also like the dewalt bits. Their head design seems to give some of the most aggressive speed I have tried but they do tend wear fairly fast under heavy use. They are cheap though so replacing them is no big deal. I recently purchased some Bosch ones because I needed to drill for stainless steel tapcon screws which require a more unusual 7/32" size and it was the only brand available in that size. My results with them were a bit so so. They worked ok but I wasn't impressed enough to keep spending more for them. Drilling on 40 year old reinforced concrete wall that is so hardened it tends to flatten the threads on steel tapcons I was averaging about 7 holes per bit before the heads burnt out and broke. I normally got a little bit more with others and drilling speed was fairly average. Oh and yes, for masonry drilling nothing beats a rotary hammer but beware, sometimes too much power is bad. For delicate areas they might end up cracking concrete and I avoid them for shorter tapcon drilling since they tend to slightly oversize holes to the point threads don't engage enough.

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                  • #10
                    I find Hilti bits to be the best for concrete and stone and Bosch to be the second best.

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                    • #11
                      I haven't used the Bosch BlueGranite bits but I have several Bosch SDS Plus Carbide bits and coupled with my Hitachi rotary drill they eat concrete like it's nobody's business!

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