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  • compressed air

    y dont they make guns that work on compressed air like a paintball gun does.. they can use the compressed air bottles. not co2

  • #2
    there was a thread about this about 6-8 mouths ago and there is some limied use like that the biggest thing i saw wrong with it was the out sid temp played a big role on how long that air/co2/fuel would last in hot areas it lasted all day cold areas maybe an hour
    9/11/01, never forget.

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    • #3
      i played on a tournament paintball team and our tanks would endure some super hot temps. they are 4500 psi 68 cu. in. very small and light. compresed air only. do you think if i rigged one up to a gun it would hurt anything. of course id have to regulated the pressure down to the gun speed.

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      • #4
        Are you confident you can correct the problem you will have with the pressure regulator only restricting the airflow? Once you stop using the gun for a while the pressure will still build up slowly and will do some serious damage once the gun is used again (that is assuming it doesn't blow up first). But it is still your choice if you next posts are typed with your nose or elbows.....
        "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
        "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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        • #5
          Hmmm, let's see if I can do the math and come out with a correct answer regarding consumption:

          There are 1728 cubic inches in 1 cubic ft of air. For a small spotting gun, you will require about 4 cubic ft per minute at 40 psi. So if you have an air supply of 68 cubic inches at 4500 psi, then that should equal approximately 7680 cubic inches of air at 40 psi (450/40 = 112.5 x 68). Theoretically the 7680 cubic inches of 40 psi air would give you only 4.44 minutes of operating time. However, the second you start to draw the air off, the pressure starts to drop and with no way to resupply the air (like a compressor in operation), you'd be lucky if you could spray for much over three minutes.

          Regarding regulation, I'm not sure if the small regulators as used on most homeowner compressors would work with a pressure that high. Most of these compressors supply from 100 to 200 psi.

          PolarSparky, the regulator sets the pressure that will pass through it. Once set to a particular pressure, it will not allow a higher pressure to pass through it, unless of course it fails. However, you have a good point, in that 4500 psi, would most likely be way above the rating of the typical plastic bodied regulators that are in the normal consumer market.

          CWS

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          • #6
            Originally posted by stretchdew
            y dont they make guns that work on compressed air like a paintball gun does.. they can use the compressed air bottles. not co2
            not sure if you're talking about a nail gun or as 1 other mentioned a spray gun

            i've used a co2 bottle for years with my portable tools and even a zip all gun.
            (3/8'' high speed ratchet). the nice thing about co2 is that you are using the gas and not the liquid. therefor the pressure will remain high throughout the contents of the bottle.approx. (500- 700 psi) i do run oil in my guns to keep them lubed.

            i have seen finish carpenters use a scuba tank on pick up work. they run a first stage regulator to drop the 3000 psi to approx. 100 psi. then an adustable regulator to fine tune the gun.

            now with all the cordless and gas powered guns out there, it's not as common as it was 10-15 years ago.

            another issue is that a high pressure scuba tank requires a license to get filled up. a nitrogen tank can be exchanged at a welding supply along with a co2 tank at a plumbing supply house.

            rick.
            phoebe it is

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            • #7
              I am on a Rescue Squad and a County USAR team. We use SCBA Cylinders with our framing nail guns for building / trench collapse incidents. We have a high-pressure regulator that attaches to the cylinders and regulates the pressure down low enough not to blow the gun apart. We use this set up because it is often easier to bring the Framing Nailer, hose and cylinder into an area and set it up for use instead of dragging the air hose through a possibly unstable area and catching it on something. I know that if it wasn’t for the fact that we had the High-pressure regulators, hoses and cylinders for Air bags and air struts that the cordless models from Paslode would have been our choice. The regulators and other equipment along with their required maintenance are expensive and that can be limiting. If you really wanted to use a compressed gas such as air or co2 you should check with you local industrial gas supplier for availability and costs, but keep in mind that a good deal of space is needed to safely store larger compressed air bottles and transportation of those bottles may have some restrictions or placarding requirements

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              • #8
                I was thinking the same thing about the volume consumtion killing the air tank. I guess he was going for the "hoseless" vs. cordless concept. This is why I still prefer the Estwig 22 oz. Hoseless as always and never needs a recharge, rarely underdrives, mostly overdrives. Somewhat safer, never heard of anyone shooting a nail through the foot with one. I understand the productivity argument, and loved using a roofing nailer.
                Only a surfer knows the feeling. Billabong ca. 1985 or so

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                • #9
                  Re: compressed air

                  check out the florida finish carp's idea, systems works great and I would recommend the reserve tank as well. The 68 ci 4500 psi your wear then refill back at the work/tool box with your reserve tank. Check out their web site for why you should use this system versus co2.

                  www.turnairsystems.com

                  great customer service as well!!

                  Bob, the owner developer actually answers the phone after hours and Sundays!

                  Donny McClure

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                  • #10
                    Re: compressed air

                    Could not access site. I read about a car engine that ran on 4500psi compressed air. I wonder how you can achieve that kind of compression and secondly what are the hazards involved? Imagine a rupture in such a tank?
                    Last edited by Frankiarmz; 02-25-2008, 03:13 PM. Reason: err

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                    • #11
                      Re: compressed air

                      Those 4500psi tanks are actually incredibly safe. I used to have a 114cu 4500psi tank from when I played many years ago. They're meant to be dropped and abused given the use they're intended for. They will take tumbles on the floor or get dropped a few times over their life. That I'm aware of i don't think there has ever been any catastrophic failure incident reported with them. The older ones were wrapped in fiberglass and now they are wrapped in carbon fiber making them almost impossible to rupture and explode. If the inner aluminum shell ruptures it will just vent all the air or nitrogen through the outer protective weave. There are videos of them being shot with rifles and they just vent harmlessly.

                      Tanks like these are basically what is used in hydrogen vehicles. It is scary to think of that much pressure but the truth is the average gasoline tank is probably a lot more likely to burst into flames than one of those tanks exploding.

                      You can certainly use them to run air tools with the proper regulation and plumbing. You'd probably need to use the primary regulator to drop the tank pressure down to what a low pressure air tool regulator can handle and fine tune with the secondary regulator.
                      Last edited by Velosapien; 02-25-2008, 05:51 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Re: compressed air

                        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                        I wonder how you can achieve that kind of compression and secondly what are the hazards involved?
                        There are multi stage compressors to achieve those pressures or just rent the tanks from a gas supply place. I remember a booster being the most common for small fields. Rent a pair of 4500psi tanks from a gas supply house. One of them was used to fill the tanks until it's pressure dropped below 4500psi. Then the second tank would power an air driven booster to recompress to 4500 psi.

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                        • #13
                          Re: compressed air

                          Man you guys have a lot of faith in these things so you must be right about their safety. I've heard of people getting hurt from tires exploding and whenever I use my compressors and they get over 90psi I get concerned.

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                          • #14
                            Re: compressed air

                            The maximum pressures on these tanks are about 7000psi. I kind of feel safer around 4500psi tanks that are carefully manufactured with lots of safety features than I do around average cheapo air compressors and hoses. Here you can see them being wrapped up in carbon fiber weave. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=133FxhVaB6g

                            You'd have to do something really dumb to make one blow like grinding off the carbon fiber shell . I can't remember how frequently it was but I think mine had to be inspected and recertified every 2 years and eventually it has to be discarded. At least in theory a reputable place will refuse to fill an uncertified or expired tank.

                            Like many things safety largely relies on the user handling the equipment properly. Most of the accidents actually involve the regulators being broken and the tanks shooting off. http://www.mefeedia.com/entry/2697389/

                            I've read apparently one of the most common dangers lately has been oiling the tanks. Someone with a minor leak will put a drop of oil in the fill nipple to stop it, when air is compressed to such high pressure the oil droplet reaches its flash point and melts and blows the regulator causing a small fire. Its become a lot more common lately since apparently the use of air compressors to fill them is far more common. Back when I played it was standard to fill with nitrogen tanks which rendered the atmosphere in the tank inert since there is no oxygen.

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                            • #15
                              Re: compressed air

                              Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                              The maximum pressures on these tanks are about 7000psi. I kind of feel safer around 4500psi tanks that are carefully manufactured with lots of safety features than I do around average cheapo air compressors and hoses. Here you can see them being wrapped up in carbon fiber weave. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=133FxhVaB6g

                              You'd have to do something really dumb to make one blow like grinding off the carbon fiber shell . I can't remember how frequently it was but I think mine had to be inspected and recertified every 2 years and eventually it has to be discarded. At least in theory a reputable place will refuse to fill an uncertified or expired tank.

                              Like many things safety largely relies on the user handling the equipment properly. Most of the accidents actually involve the regulators being broken and the tanks shooting off. http://www.mefeedia.com/entry/2697389/

                              I've read apparently one of the most common dangers lately has been oiling the tanks. Someone with a minor leak will put a drop of oil in the fill nipple to stop it, when air is compressed to such high pressure the oil droplet reaches its flash point and melts and blows the regulator causing a small fire. Its become a lot more common lately since apparently the use of air compressors to fill them is far more common. Back when I played it was standard to fill with nitrogen tanks which rendered the atmosphere in the tank inert since there is no oxygen.
                              Good video, they wrapped that tank every which way but loose! This Forum overall has been a real education. I've gotten to learn a lot of things and picked up some handy tips that I can actually use. There is so much that experienced folks have to share that it's nice to have a place like this. Thanks to all.

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