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  • Laserkerf

    I purchased a Laserkerf and have been pleased with the device. Recently the beam started to fade until I can no longer see it. I think there is dust in the inside. I have (gently) tried to clean the device but still no luck. Has anyone else had the problem? Also as an observation I don’t think I had any problem until I connected my dust collecting system. I think it draws dust across the device and causes the problem.

    goodrich_mike

  • #2
    If you have the battery powered model maybe you just need new batteries.
    ================================================== ====
    All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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    • #3
      cleaning laserkerf

      I had one on my delta 10" miter saw. use a "Q-tip" with only water to clean the lens. also you can use light air from a blow gun to blow off the debris.
      The only other possibility is you cracked the plastic lens, from flying debris, and the beam is being deflected and thus a dim light where you want it.

      When this thing is set up correctly on older mitre saws it works really well and is much safer than those spinning types.

      my laserkerf unit had the plug in wall wart power supply.
      cactus man
      Last edited by cactusman; 06-24-2006, 03:26 PM.

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      • #4
        As you explained, that it "began to fade", I might expect (as BD mentioned) that the batteries have died. I'm not sure how much battery power it takes for the diode to "lase", but I would expect that a fading battery would not be enough.

        On the 10" Ridgid CMS that I have, the Exactline laser requires three watch-type button batteries. The laser itself is only activated by centrifugal force supplied by the blade's powered rotation. However, that rotation is only the trigger mechanism... the three watch batteries supply the power.

        I hope this helps,

        CWS

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        • #5
          Too bad they can't come up with one that generates its own power using the centrifugal force of the spinning blade. Then you would never have to replace the batteries.
          "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

          https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bob D.
            Too bad they can't come up with one that generates its own power using the centrifugal force of the spinning blade. Then you would never have to replace the batteries.

            Just stick a coil in a magnetic field and induce some voltage 'n you're almost done!

            Quick, let's get a patent!
            Phil
            Tools Rule

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