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CO 2 powered nailgun setup

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  • CO 2 powered nailgun setup

    I setup a CO2 nailgun system a little bit ago and thought I would post some info for others that may want to do the same.

    I bought a 150 PSI fixed CO2 regulator from http://www.wheelersoffroad.com/co2systems.htm (on the bottom of the page $37.50 plus shipping I think the shipping was like $20)

    I then bought a few fittings and another adjustable regulator from HD (about $30)
    I bought 2 different regulators, the first one did not work right it was the little one with the little knob. I then bought a little bigger one with the plastic knob like on most compressors and that one works great.

    I bought a 2.5# CO2 aluminum cylinder and a 15# cylinder (total for both and both filled about $170) the 2.5# is an aluminum tank and the 15# is a steel tank.

    I then just cut a short hose from one of my 100’ hose.

    I have run over 50 nails through my Hitachi NR83 from the 2.5# cylinder. And it fits in my nail pouch on the side. Not something that I would use EVERY day. BUT when you only need to come and put in some blocking, do a few pieces of trim… etc. You cant beat it because you can use ANY air tool on it including airing up your truck tires.

    I would like to see if I can get a regulator to fill my 2.5# tank from my 15# tank so I don’t have to take it to a shop every time I need it filled.

    If anyone wants more info let me know. OR if you know of a way I can fill my 2.5# from another tank let me know.

    Couple of pics.


    Colorado Deck and Framing - When perfection is demanded

  • #2
    robert, i've done this for years with a 20# tank and a 16oz. tank.

    i own 6- 20# tanks and a couple of smaller tanks. 1 of the 20# tanks i had a dip tube/ siphon tube installed. this allows me to draw liquid co2/ dry ice from it. i use this to freeze pipes.

    when i need to refill my smaller tanks i use the siphon tank to fill the small tank. to do this you lower the temperature in the empty tank. i put mine in the freezer then i remove it and connect a high pressure braided hose to both tanks. (full and empty) you need the proper threaded nuts. i then open the tanks and the empty one will fill as the pressure will equalize. remember that the pressure will rise as the temperature goes up. use a scale to fill the tank with, otherwise you can overfill and cause the burst disc to let go.

    these tanks require an annual inspection with a 5 year hydro test and engraved stamp. typically not a do it yourself thing. paint ball players do it all the time. to lower the temperature, they fill and empty fast to lower the tank temp. then refill to the proper weight.

    be safe.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the tip Rick. I guess I will have to get another tank with a syphon tube... I might get a larger one then for that purpose.
      Colorado Deck and Framing - When perfection is demanded

      Comment


      • #4
        [QUOTE=RobertCDF]
        I then bought a few fittings and another adjustable regulator from HD (about $30)
        I bought 2 different regulators, the first one did not work right it was the little one with the little knob. I then bought a little bigger one with the plastic knob like on most compressors and that one works great.

        The reason the first one didn't work is because it is a volume regulator, not a pressure regulator. Basically, the one with the small knob is just a needle valve that restricts the air flow thru it, lowering the volume of air that can pass thru it. It is useful for regulating the speed of a tool or the output of a spray gun during continuous spray, but the pressure builds back up to line pressure when the tool's trigger is released. The one with the plastic knob (and also a gauge normally) is a real pressure regulator with a spring-loaded internal diaphragm to offset the line pressure. The more you tighten the knob and compress the spring, the more pressure it will let by the diaphragm. With it, the lower pressure stays constant even when the tool's trigger is released.
        The volume regulator is designed for use with rotary air tools that use the initial higher line pressure to get rotating and then the speed drops to stay constant. The pressure regulator is designed for use with spray guns or blowing type tools, altho it can be used to to reduce the torque on an impact gun.
        Note that experienced spray painters commonly use the volume regulator because it is cheaper and not affected by thinner when cleaning the gun. They have learned to pull the trigger part way (just air) long enough to let the pressure drop before pulling it far enough to let the paint spray out.
        When buying a pressure regulator, ensure it is rated for pressures as high or higher than the line pressure to it. The spring is of a strength to overcome the rated pressure. If the pressure is too high, it will overcome the spring and blow by the diaphragm.
        Just a bit of trivia
        Last edited by Gofor; 07-10-2006, 07:01 PM.
        Practicing at practical wood working

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the tips Gofor and yes my first reg puts out 150 psi and my second reg can handle 200 psi.

          Hey Rick, Instead of a syphon tank (I want to be able to use my 15# tank to run the gun off of) I can just invert the 15# tank right? If they are upside down I heard it comes out in a liquid gas just like on the syphon tanks. Let me know what you think. BTW what kind of scale are you using? I dont think the bathroom scale would be acurate enough for this.
          Colorado Deck and Framing - When perfection is demanded

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RobertCDF
            Thanks for the tips Gofor and yes my first reg puts out 150 psi and my second reg can handle 200 psi.

            Hey Rick, Instead of a syphon tank (I want to be able to use my 15# tank to run the gun off of) I can just invert the 15# tank right? If they are upside down I heard it comes out in a liquid gas just like on the syphon tanks. Let me know what you think. BTW what kind of scale are you using? I dont think the bathroom scale would be acurate enough for this.
            correct, if you have a valve guard around the tank handle, you can balance the tank upside down. i've done this on many occasions. just be carfull not to knock the bottle over.

            an electronic scale is very accurate. you can set the tare weight to 0 and measure the contents of the fill.

            make sure you use oil in your gun as the co2 is corrosive. you might want to think about nitrogen or compressed air from a scuba tank. co2 is good for air testing pipes, but not the greatest for air tools.

            rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK
              make sure you use oil in your gun as the co2 is corrosive. you might want to think about nitrogen or compressed air from a scuba tank. co2 is good for air testing pipes, but not the greatest for air tools. rick.

              Ditto what RIck says. I believe CO2 will quickly degrade the rubber in seals.
              Phil
              Tools Rule

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