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Comparison of Ridgid 24v and Milwaukee v28 lithium tools...

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  • Comparison of Ridgid 24v and Milwaukee v28 lithium tools...

    For the moment I own both the Ridgid 4 piece, 24v lithium combo and the Milwaukee 4 piece, V28 lithium combo. I’m going to post some comparisons between the sets in this thread, starting with the drills. Check back for more comparisons I’ll post as time permits.

    *** Note: the 18v Ridgid batteries fit ALL of the 24 volt tools perfectly (at least the 18v batteries with “Max HC” on their sides do—I don’t know about the newer ones with “2.5 Ah). However, the reverse is not true; the 24 volt batteries definitely do not fit ANY of the 18v tools. The 24 volt tools are noticeably less powerful when operated with the 18v batteries.

    I’m reluctant to use the 18v batteries with the rest of the 24v tools as I don’t know if its okay to use them together. Then again, it can’t be an accident that the 18v batteries fit the 24v tools, can it?


    Anyway, here are some comparisons between the Ridgid and Milwaukee lithium drills:

    Battery weight:

    Ridgid 24v battery: 2 lbs. 2.4 oz
    Milwaukee V28 battery: 2 lbs. 5.2 oz

    Tool weights (all including batteries):

    Ridgid drill: 6 lbs. 12.2 oz.
    Milwaukee drill: 6 lbs. 13.2 oz.

    Milwaukee’s drill creates considerable sparks when the motor is stopped. In fact, there is so much sparking that noticeable sparks are often thrown out beyond the vent holes in the drill housing. This causes me to have to wear eye protection when drilling in tight spaces (which I usually wouldn’t do unless I’m drilling above my head). The Ridgid drill rarely casts sparks beyond its housing, and sparks it does cast are much smaller.

    The chucks on both drills are virtually identical. They are both ½” chucks and have the same markings. Both drills have two speeds and a forward/reverse switch. The Milwaukee drill has 20 torque settings (plus drill) on its torque ring, whereas the Ridgid has 24.

    The Milwaukee drill’s mode change ring has two settings: drill and hammer. The Ridgid’s has three: drill, drive, and hammer. On the Ridgid, the torque adjustment ring only functions when the drill is in the drive mode. On the Milwaukee, the torque ring has a drill setting, which disables the torque ring. I guess there is a slight advantage with the Ridgid as adjusting the mode change ring is faster than rotating the torque ring on the Milwaukee.

    The battery on the Milwaukee drill can be slid on from either the front or back, which leaves the battery in a different position when mounted. I guess this allows it to be used in some tight situations in which the Ridgid might not be useable, but I’ve rarely if ever used this feature on either of the cordless Milwaukee drills I’ve owned.

    It may seem minor, but Ridgid has not included a holder for a screw bit on its drill (although it has included a two-sided bit). Ridgid has these holders on their 18v drills, 18v impact drivers and 12v right-angle impact drivers. Why they’d leave it off their new, top-of-the-line drill is beyond me. Milwaukee has two of these holders on the side of its V28 drill.

    I haven’t used the Ridgid drill much yet, but the Milwaukee has always seemed almost too powerful. Compared to an 18v nicad drill, the Milwaukee V28 will practically break your wrist if you’re not careful. When a screw bottomed out or a paddle bit jammed on an 18v drill, I could always hold the drill against its power. With V28, if I wasn’t paying attention, it would just about twist my wrist off. I'm sure there are applications where I'd want the extra power, but for drilling wood and driving screws, 24 volts will be more than enough.

    If Milwaukee's higher voltage has an advantage, I expect it to show with saws in the kit. And with other items such as Milwaukee’s V28 rotary hammer. But I suspect that 28 volts might not be enough for a rotary hammer. That’s when you might want Bosch’s 36 volt rotary hammer. (I’ve handled the DeWalt 36 volt tools, and they feel like junk.)

    .....
    These differences are minor. Both drills feel solid and very powerful. I’d have to say the Milwaukee is slightly more powerful, but the Ridgid feels a little better-made. Once I use the Ridgid drill more, I’ll post any more differences I notice.

    For me, the Ridgid lithium set is a much, much better buy than the Milwaukee due to its free lifetime service agreement and, more importantly, free replacement batteries (Milwaukee’s V28 batteries cost over $100 apiece).

    Perhaps the Bosch lithium 36 volt line will be worth the extra money and loss of the lifetime service agreement to those who need the extra power, but I just don’t think the difference between 24 volt and 28 volt is significant.


    By the way, I really have no justification for owning 3 sets of cordless tools. I've hardly used the v28 tools as it is (but I have used them enough to comment on them). I'll be selling the Milwaukee tools and keeping both of my Ridgid sets.
    Last edited by Lee M; 07-11-2006, 06:40 PM.
    So many saws, so few fingers...

  • #2
    In the July issue of Popular Mechanics they conducted a screw marathon driving and withdrawing ¼ x 2.5” lags and the Ridgid prevailed over the Milwaukee 176 to 153. When it came to crosscutting 2 x 6 construction stock the Milwaukee exceeded the Ridgid 148 to 102.

    Woodslayer

    Comment


    • #3
      clarification on using 18v in your 24v

      quote from ProBrand
      Your 18v NiCad batteries will work with the XLi tools. While the tools are optimized for 24v, you should be satisfied with with their performance should you find the need to use the 18v pack. You are also correct in saying that the XLi battery will not retrofit into any existing 18v tools. Thanks for your support of RIDGID.
      Josh

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks very much for the clarification, Josh. I found the post you're quoting in another thread. I should've read that entire thread before posting.

        I see that you are an administrator. Does that mean you work for Ridgid? I noticed ProBrand is a moderator. From his post, I take it he does work for Ridgid?

        Anyway, the post after ProBrand's (from PhilG.) makes a point about how running power tools at the lower voltage might damage their motors over time. PhilG. compares it to using an undersized extension cord with a powertool, which I know is a bad idea. Is his analogy correct; can running the 24v tools on the 18v batteries damage them over time?
        Last edited by Lee M; 07-13-2006, 07:57 PM.
        So many saws, so few fingers...

        Comment


        • #5
          It’s great to see Ridgid getting these tools out, unfortunately for me it was about 6 weeks too late. I got in the market for some new tools when my 24 month warranted Delta drill smoked out after 25 months. I started off looking at more 18V tools before I quickly discovered the new Lithium Ion technology. After the bad Delta experience I was intrigued by Ridgids lifetime warranty on their 18V line but decided on taking the leap to Lithium Ion which lead me to the Milwaukee V28 due to their 5 year warranty.

          Going Lithium Ion over NiCd was the best call I made. The power outstanding for my moderate applications, my first use with the circular saw was a simple 2x4 cross cut. With my 18V I had the mindset of “I can do that”, with the Lithium Ion the job was over before it started. Recently a friend of mine broke his wrist using an 18V DeWalt driver that got away from him at the end of a long day. No doubt the Ridgid and Milwaukee could do the same if you’re not careful, a second handle really helps control the tool, I’ve had no issue so far. I did get the sparky light show on the drill too at first but that has faded.

          Ridgids warranty offer is very impressive, it does take a little effort to understand its details but contrasts strongly to my experience with Delta. After my drill died I contacted Delta and was informed that they dropped all support for the tool, no part availability, nothing. They did offer a trade-in deal, for the remainder of my set plus $150 I’ll get a new set. Sounded good until I checked and saw it was a cheap Black and Decker line that I could get locally for $180 or on eBay for $120. Given this and that I still have a good jigsaw and brad nailer for the set (along with an underpowered circular saw and a not very useful pad sander) the “offer” seemed a bit disingenuous. As a result of the Delta experience I put a strong emphasis on warranty and refused to consider anything from the B&D family, including DeWalt. Seeing Ridget and Milwaukee stand by their tools with extended warranties should not be overlooked.

          To me, the 36V tools on the market seemed too bulky, too pricy and had too little warranty, a short 3 years. For a rotary hammer 36V will excel but that’s at the expense of everything else. The 24-28V range seems to be the current sweet spot for overall utility, the fact that you get the best warranty here almost makes it a no brainer. For most except the seasoned contractor I don’t see how lab results that vary by 30% or so on the amount of feet cut or holes drilled from one brand or other is going to make much of a difference in the field, there is plenty of power to go around at these levels.

          I like how Ridgid includes a double charger with their tools but I’ve found this may not be as important for Lithium Ion since the batteries hold their charge much longer than NiCd, this means there is little motivation to have them plugged in 24x7. Still, it doesn’t hurt to have for some situations.

          Lithium Ion has already made a difference for me and was worth the added expense. I am more than pleased having the Milwaukee in my amateur hands but the new Ridgid with the lifetime warranty look to be a winner as well.

          Comment


          • #6
            I spoke to a Ridgid representative at a Home Depot Contractor's Event the other day. He informed me that Ridgid is discontinuing all of their 18 volt tools in favor of tools that will run on either 18 volt ni-cad or 24 volt lithium tools. He said these tools will include an impact driver and jigsaw, among others I can't remember.

            He said that most of these tools will be available individually, without batteries, so that those of us with combo kits will not have to duplicate batteries with the addition of each tool. The batteries and chargers will also be sold separately so that you can add batteries if you want to. The plan is that the cost of say a Ridgid cordless drill plus a battery and charger bought separately will be no more than it would be if all three items were purchased together in a kit.

            He further said that their is no plan to replace the lower-voltage ni-cad tools (like the cordless screwdriver or the right-angle impact driver).

            The rep confirmed that operation of these new tools with 18 volt batteries will not damage them, even though they are capable of 24 volt operation.

            (By the way, there is a new, improved cordless jigsaw on the way that will accept the 18 volt ni-cad and 24 volt lithium batteries on the way.)
            Last edited by Lee M; 08-25-2006, 07:37 PM.
            So many saws, so few fingers...

            Comment


            • #7
              I spoke with a Ridgid rep a couple months ago, and he said the 24V line will be similar to the Ryobi One+ line, in reference to the amount of tools offered.

              Did you hear similar? I'm just wondering if a 24V Jigsaw is on the horizon?

              Heard anything?

              Comment


              • #8
                if you know someone at depot have them look in the system there are 6 new tools listed under the max select name tool only going to be selling for $119. Jigsaw, recip, circ, impact driver, hand planer and caulk gun. Just cant seem to part with their caulk gun can they. I really hope that the 12v right angle will be added to this new line imagine a 24v right angle impact driver that would be awsome.
                Last edited by RedBaron; 08-25-2006, 05:53 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  CheekyMonkeyWrench--

                  I made an error in my post before yours (which I just corrected).. It is a new, improved 24 volt jigsaw that is on the way. It will be very similar to the current Ridgid corded jigsaw.
                  So many saws, so few fingers...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    thanks Lee.

                    That sounds awesome, hopefully it has a blower like the corded version.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ...eagerlly awaiting Milwaukee vs. Ridgid reciprocating saw review.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think the answer to the reciprocating saw review is going to be obvious - HINT - Milwaukee invented the sawzall. Another HINT - I have talked to a few guys now online and in person who say the Sawzall is the best tool in the entire milwaukee 28 volt 4 piece set and that it is comparable to their corded versions. HINT#3 I just bought the 28 volt 4 piece set tonight and I haven't cut anything with it yet but I have to say after pulling the trigger on the sawzall a few times I look forward to using it tommorrow at work.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                          I think the answer to the reciprocating saw review is going to be obvious - HINT - Milwaukee invented the sawzall. Another HINT - I have talked to a few guys now online and in person who say the Sawzall is the best tool in the entire milwaukee 28 volt 4 piece set and that it is comparable to their corded versions. HINT#3 I just bought the 28 volt 4 piece set tonight and I haven't cut anything with it yet but I have to say after pulling the trigger on the sawzall a few times I look forward to using it tommorrow at work.
                          Scott-

                          I'm with you, and I just bought the Ridgid set. The Milwaukee recip is the saw to get. I'd put the new Makita right behind it, if you're looking for a lighter saw.

                          I'll say that the 24v recip is an improvement over the older 18v recip. I'd love to get a Sawzall "Hatchet" for either system.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yeah I'm wondering if they're going to come out with a 28 volt Milwaukee hatchet sawzall. I'm hoping they will at some point.

                            I had the chance to use my 28 volt sawzall at work doing some demo for a bathroom cutting drywall, a bit of wood, and some steel stud here and there and all I have to say is WOW. It feels at the minimum a 10 amp Milwaukee Sawzall, perhaps nearly challenging the 11 Amp supersawzall, only it doesn't have orbital action. I heard the reason they didn't put orbital action on the Milwaukee 28 volt sawzall was because the orbital feature actually draws quite a bit more power. But the 1 1/8" stroke is great and it cuts fast. I can only hope that Ridgid improved upon their 18 volt Ni-cad reciprocating saw of yesteryear in their 24 volt set. I knew a guy who had a Ridgid 4 piece 18 volt set last year who used to work with me and the 18 volt recip saw in that set left a bit to be desired compared to my bosses 18 volt DeWalt Ni-cad reciprocating saw which was actually surprisingly quick & powerful for it's size.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                              Yeah I'm wondering if they're going to come out with a 28 volt Milwaukee hatchet sawzall. I'm hoping they will at some point.

                              I had the chance to use my 28 volt sawzall at work doing some demo for a bathroom cutting drywall, a bit of wood, and some steel stud here and there and all I have to say is WOW. It feels at the minimum a 10 amp Milwaukee Sawzall, perhaps nearly challenging the 11 Amp supersawzall, only it doesn't have orbital action. I heard the reason they didn't put orbital action on the Milwaukee 28 volt sawzall was because the orbital feature actually draws quite a bit more power. But the 1 1/8" stroke is great and it cuts fast. I can only hope that Ridgid improved upon their 18 volt Ni-cad reciprocating saw of yesteryear in their 24 volt set. I knew a guy who had a Ridgid 4 piece 18 volt set last year who used to work with me and the 18 volt recip saw in that set left a bit to be desired compared to my bosses 18 volt DeWalt Ni-cad reciprocating saw which was actually surprisingly quick & powerful for it's size.
                              I think the 24v recip saw is the most improved tool in comparison to the 18v recip saw. I hated the 18v recip saw, and I think they've greatly improved it with the 24v one. I haven't fired mine up yet, but when I tried it at the Home Depot on a piece of 4x4 pressure treated post, it was a ton more smooth. The front of the tool isn't as narrow as I'd like it, but it's adequate (this is where I prefer the Makita, Dewalt, and of course Milwaukee). I'd have to say that the drill is still my favorite tool out of the set.
                              Last edited by Paladin2025; 10-30-2006, 02:15 AM. Reason: grammar

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