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R6300 impact driver

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  • R6300 impact driver

    I am considering purchase of an impact wrench driver. I am looking for a corded electric if it will do the trick. The Rigid R6300 puts out 450 ft/lbs of torque. Question #1, can this tool be used in general to remove a wheel of a truck or car? Question #2, if this wrench can be used for lug nuts on a car and you use it to tigthen the lug nuts, can it tigthen too much? Question #3, the wrench has two speeds(low & high), which speed gives the most torque? Thanks for you help. I was wanting to get something to make taking blades off my lawn mower easy and use in changing tires at home on my car and truck.

  • #2
    On page 11 of the owners manual it states: "Do not use this tool to install lug nuts on wheels without a torque limiting device. Doing so could result in galled or broken lugs."
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      John,
      I have to agree with BadgerDave on his comment. In addition to, it is okay to tighten the lug nut until it makes contact with the wheel with the electric torque wrench. Once contact is made, it is better to finish the job off by hand.
      Electric torque wrenches are just like pneumatic ones, the manufactures design them so that the the torque in reverse is stronger than forward. This function always allows you to be able to remove the bolt using the same tool, just in case the bolt is overtightened. Yes, it can tighten to much in certain situations.
      The slow speed will have the higher torque setting, since in electric motors, torque is a function of current, while voltage is a function of rpm. By the way, I use my torque wrench for changing lawnmower blades. Saves a lot of bloody knuckles.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Master Engineer
        The slow speed will have the higher torque setting, since in electric motors, torque is a function of current, while voltage is a function of rpm. By the way, I use my torque wrench for changing lawnmower blades. Saves a lot of bloody knuckles.
        You are correct in your statement regarding motors but impacts do not work on the same principal. For an impact the faster the motor turns the higher the torque that is achieved. Impacts output shafts are not directly connected to the motor but are buffered by a spring mechanism. The faster the motor turns the harder and faster the anvil hits the drive, the greater the torque developed.
        So I would think that the high speed setting would give the most torque

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        • #5
          Wayne,
          Yes, you are correct. Impact drivers deliver more power at a higher speed. I forgot about that very important part about the spring and the anvil setup in impact drivers.

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          • #6
            Re: R6300 impact driver

            Originally posted by Master Engineer View Post
            John,

            Electric torque wrenches are just like pneumatic ones, the manufactures design them so that the the torque in reverse is stronger than forward. This function always allows you to be able to remove the bolt using the same tool, just in case the bolt is overtightened.
            Sounds good, but not true, same torque both ways - on the vast majority of them.

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            • #7
              Re: R6300 impact driver

              Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
              You are correct in your statement regarding motors but impacts do not work on the same principal. For an impact the faster the motor turns the higher the torque that is achieved. Impacts output shafts are not directly connected to the motor but are buffered by a spring mechanism. The faster the motor turns the harder and faster the anvil hits the drive, the greater the torque developed.
              So I would think that the high speed setting would give the most torque
              I don't want to steal this guys thread however I have not had any response to my question on another thread so I'm going to try here as the responses seem very knowledgable.
              I have had the MaxSelect impact tool for several months and have been very happy with its performance. I have always used the 18V LI batteries with it and have not seen any reason to use the 24V batteries.
              My nephew who I work with recently purchased the 14.4V impact tool. We have been building a set of porch stairs using some pretty wet treated wood. I noticed my 18V gun was rattling pretty hard driving 3 1/2" screws into this stuff. Passed it off as typical wet treated wood screwing. At some point I happened to use my nephews 14.4V gun and was surprised at how much easier and faster it was driving the screws. Later I switched mine to a 24V battery and although the performance improved it was still slower than his 14.4.
              Whats up?....
              Specs-
              1-Torque 1400/14.4V vs 1490/18V+24V....No real advantage there
              2-RPM 2850/14.4V vs 1700/18V and 2100/24V....."Significantly faster" for the 14.4V
              3-BPM 2800/14.4V vs 2900/18V and 3300/24V.....Slightly faster hammer rate for the 18 and 24.
              What does it all mean you mechanical engineers out there? Has anyone else experianced this? Is my MaxSlect impact defective or the 14.4V faster?
              Based on "WBrooks" input the 14.4V drivers much faster RPM rate would indicate that it must be a more powerfull impact than the 18V or 24V MaxSelect.
              My question of course is, why would Ridgid do this? I would appreciate any help on this.
              Thanks..Ray

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