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  • #16
    Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
    DeWalt's drill might "look" heavy, but it's not. Milwaukee's V28 is rated at 6.7lbs, 36V is 6.9lbs..and a more powerful drill to boot. .2 lbs difference - big friggin deal.

    In comparison, Milwaukee's 18V "Lok Tor" drill is 6.5lbs and only an 18V!

    You're not really talking a huge difference in weight here, especially considering the gain in power.
    It still is fairly heavy but considering the massive power gain its really not a big deal. I got their new DC925 18v hammer drill which weighs 6.1lbs, it replaced the older DC988 which weighs 5.9. Their rated power was 420 UWO for the DC988 and the DC925 increased it to 510 UWO. Its just under a 20% increase in power but testing both drills side to side the DC925 was immediately noticeable as being quite more powerfull. Drilling 3/16 and 1/4" holes into reinforced concrete with large stone aggregate the DC925 went in considerably faster and with less effort. Now the 36v drill is rated at 750 UWO! Thats not bad for a 0.8lb increase! That not only outclasses their corded models but when you compare them side to side the cordless is actually a fair bit more compact. For comparisons sake Boschs 24v drill weighs 7.7lbs!

    Comment


    • #17
      Yeah supposedly (or so I recall) the Milwaukee V18 tools are actually true 20 volt batteries from what I recall hearing/reading on the Tool talk forum when they had it on the Milwaukee site.

      Comment


      • #18
        I bought the DeWalt 36V set not too long ago, and I am consistenly blown away with the power every time I use them. They are absolutely awesome. I wasn't too big on DeWalt before, always thought they were just so so, but this kit changed my mind.

        At first I was majorly skeptical, so the first thing I did was chuck a 2 9/16" Milwaukee self feed bit into the drill, clamped down a 2x6 and went to town. boom boom boom boom.. hole after hole, the drill screams through like nothin'. It bareley even strains the motor, doesn't slow down, whimper, stall or anything.. now haven't tried it yet, but there's no doubt it will drive a 3+" self feed bit quite easily. The torque and speed output is phenomenal. This thing will take any corded drill to task.

        The circular saw was next.. with a 7 1/4" blade I thought for sure it would be underpowered, but it cuts through wood like s**t through a goose. lol cuts curves, veers off the line without even coming close to stalling..you name it, it will do it. Plus it gives you that familar "growl" as it shreds through a 2x6 like a corded 7 1/4 saw does. I can't describe it on here, but you know what I'm talking about.. it's kind of like hearing a V8 after listening to 4 cyliner engines for so long. it's just...satisfying.. lol Mind you the motor itself is way quieter than a corded circ. In fact it sounds like a regular 18V saw pretty much - but the similarity ends when you start cutting. Majorly impressive. The fact that they made a 7 1/4" circ is a HUGE step in cordless. I remember on Milwaukee Tool Talk they were saying they tried to make a V28 7 1/4", but the power output was too much like a 6 1/2" 18V. So DeWalt have made a major breakthrough here.

        The recip saw is a bloody machine gun. It's just plain mean, and a wickedly fun tool to use, but you have to be careful. Not even under the worst loading will it stall and in fact it could rip itself out of your hands before giving up, so you have to watch it. This is a full-force demolition saw that would challenge an 11 AMP corded sawzall no problem.

        The batteries - they are great. They don't get hot, they charge great and last forever with the well published fade-free power. Most of the charge seems to happen within the first 30 minutes, so if you're in a hurry it's great There's no fuel gauge on the batteries though - you have to put them in the charger to see that charge level, but actually that doesn't bother me. in fact I appreciate the fact that DeWalt didn't do that because then your tools start to feel like your cellphone. What's next? a satelite phone and downloadable games built into your drill? lol

        as far as the weight goes, it just doesn't bother me at all. The drill is 6.9lbs, but as a comparison, my old Milwaukee 18V is 6.5lbs and nowhere near the power or battery endurance. I've always found DeWalt's ergonomics to be top notch anyway and their balance is always bang on.

        Comment


        • #19
          Sceeter - but we just have to know:

          Is it a DeWalt 36 volt drill, or a DeWobble 36 volt drill?

          I'm quite frankly blown away by the 28 Volt Milwaukee Sawzall. I think it's a great tool. I haven't had the chance to put the drill through it's paces yet. Made a few cuts with the circ saw and the circ saw always seems to surprise you. It doesn't get the RPM's initially (well, 4200 RPM which is better thant he 18 volts I've used in the past), but it seems to have good torque for maintaining RPM's through the cut. That's what I've found with all cordless 18 volt circ saws and the Milwaukee 28 volt circ saw seems to follow suit only it has more power and more RPM's. I honestly couldln't ask for more myself being a plumber. I'm not doing cross cuts or ripping all day, just a bit of backing here, a bit of backing there, demoing or cutting out this, and drill holes here and there or screws for hangers or for clamps to hold pipe, or to drill holes in masonary to bolt down toilet flanges. I'm looking forward to the 28 volt Right Angle drill I got on my to buy list. I heard it turns the big self feeds very well.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
            I bought the DeWalt 36V set not too long ago, and I am consistenly blown away with the power every time I use them. They are absolutely awesome. I wasn't too big on DeWalt before, always thought they were just so so, but this kit changed my mind.

            At first I was majorly skeptical, so the first thing I did was chuck a 2 9/16" Milwaukee self feed bit into the drill, clamped down a 2x6 and went to town. boom boom boom boom.. hole after hole, the drill screams through like nothin'. It bareley even strains the motor, doesn't slow down, whimper, stall or anything.. now haven't tried it yet, but there's no doubt it will drive a 3+" self feed bit quite easily. The torque and speed output is phenomenal. This thing will take any corded drill to task.

            The circular saw was next.. with a 7 1/4" blade I thought for sure it would be underpowered, but it cuts through wood like s**t through a goose. lol cuts curves, veers off the line without even coming close to stalling..you name it, it will do it. Plus it gives you that familar "growl" as it shreds through a 2x6 like a corded 7 1/4 saw does. I can't describe it on here, but you know what I'm talking about.. it's kind of like hearing a V8 after listening to 4 cyliner engines for so long. it's just...satisfying.. lol Mind you the motor itself is way quieter than a corded circ. In fact it sounds like a regular 18V saw pretty much - but the similarity ends when you start cutting. Majorly impressive. The fact that they made a 7 1/4" circ is a HUGE step in cordless. I remember on Milwaukee Tool Talk they were saying they tried to make a V28 7 1/4", but the power output was too much like a 6 1/2" 18V. So DeWalt have made a major breakthrough here.

            The recip saw is a bloody machine gun. It's just plain mean, and a wickedly fun tool to use, but you have to be careful. Not even under the worst loading will it stall and in fact it could rip itself out of your hands before giving up, so you have to watch it. This is a full-force demolition saw that would challenge an 11 AMP corded sawzall no problem.

            The batteries - they are great. They don't get hot, they charge great and last forever with the well published fade-free power. Most of the charge seems to happen within the first 30 minutes, so if you're in a hurry it's great There's no fuel gauge on the batteries though - you have to put them in the charger to see that charge level, but actually that doesn't bother me. in fact I appreciate the fact that DeWalt didn't do that because then your tools start to feel like your cellphone. What's next? a satelite phone and downloadable games built into your drill? lol

            as far as the weight goes, it just doesn't bother me at all. The drill is 6.9lbs, but as a comparison, my old Milwaukee 18V is 6.5lbs and nowhere near the power or battery endurance. I've always found DeWalt's ergonomics to be top notch anyway and their balance is always bang on.
            Thanks for the review! I've been eyeing the 36v tools for a while but really wanted to hear some reactions first. I mainly am interested in them for the circular saw, reciprocating saw and hammer drill, possibly the rotary hammer too. From what you've said it seems they might be exactly what I wanted! I have Dewalt 18v tools and recently got the updated 18v hammer drill which shares the new self tightening chuck design used on the 36v drill. This chuck alone makes the hammer drill worth while and stand out from the competition. No more super tightening of keyed chuck or peeling your hands on keyless chucks to keep bits from slipping in hammer mode. Just turn till it stops and click. Works like a dream. I agree their drills have great ergonomics. Perfectly center balanced with the battery pack tucked in close and parallel to the main body for a lower profile rather than the sprawled out design almost everyone else uses.

            Comment


            • #21
              LOL no, it's not a DeWobble this time. The chuck is straight. I can't believe that chuck wobble problem they had on the old XRP series and older drills. It was just embarassing. How on earth could they have let that out the door?

              V28 are good tools and it was a tough decision between between that and the 36V. The 7 1/4" blade was one of the selling points though. So I gave DeWalt another chance and it looks like they have a winner this time.

              I think the V28 sawzall is as powerful as the 36V, the specs are pretty much the same.

              How do you find the hammerdrill? most reviews seem to say it's pretty powerful.

              Originally posted by Scott K View Post
              Sceeter - but we just have to know:

              Is it a DeWalt 36 volt drill, or a DeWobble 36 volt drill?

              I'm quite frankly blown away by the 28 Volt Milwaukee Sawzall. I think it's a great tool. I haven't had the chance to put the drill through it's paces yet. Made a few cuts with the circ saw and the circ saw always seems to surprise you. It doesn't get the RPM's initially (well, 4200 RPM which is better thant he 18 volts I've used in the past), but it seems to have good torque for maintaining RPM's through the cut. That's what I've found with all cordless 18 volt circ saws and the Milwaukee 28 volt circ saw seems to follow suit only it has more power and more RPM's. I honestly couldln't ask for more myself being a plumber. I'm not doing cross cuts or ripping all day, just a bit of backing here, a bit of backing there, demoing or cutting out this, and drill holes here and there or screws for hangers or for clamps to hold pipe, or to drill holes in masonary to bolt down toilet flanges. I'm looking forward to the 28 volt Right Angle drill I got on my to buy list. I heard it turns the big self feeds very well.

              Comment


              • #22
                The self-tightening chuck is pretty damn cool. You'd swear it's not tight after turning and clicking it once, but I've never had it let of of the bit at all.

                The new DC925 is a nice unit..definit improvement over the older 988.

                Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                Thanks for the review! I've been eyeing the 36v tools for a while but really wanted to hear some reactions first. I mainly am interested in them for the circular saw, reciprocating saw and hammer drill, possibly the rotary hammer too. From what you've said it seems they might be exactly what I wanted! I have Dewalt 18v tools and recently got the updated 18v hammer drill which shares the new self tightening chuck design used on the 36v drill. This chuck alone makes the hammer drill worth while and stand out from the competition. No more super tightening of keyed chuck or peeling your hands on keyless chucks to keep bits from slipping in hammer mode. Just turn till it stops and click. Works like a dream. I agree their drills have great ergonomics. Perfectly center balanced with the battery pack tucked in close and parallel to the main body for a lower profile rather than the sprawled out design almost everyone else uses.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by AllanToolGuy
                  Everyone check this out. DeWalt really has gone ape Yes, now they do have 24 Volt cordless tools out. What comes next?

                  http://www.dewalt.com/us/cordless/co...asp?voltage=24
                  Those are the old NiCD 24v tools which have been out for a very long time. They're just not very popular because of the weight and size. I wouldn't be surprised if that entire 24V line is phased out in favor of the 36v tools, which make the 24v line obsolete in pretty much every respect except price maybe.
                  Last edited by Velosapien; 11-02-2006, 12:20 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
                    The self-tightening chuck is pretty damn cool. You'd swear it's not tight after turning and clicking it once, but I've never had it let of of the bit at all.

                    The new DC925 is a nice unit..definit improvement over the older 988.
                    Hey I forgot to ask. How does the 36v batter compare side to side with the 18v XRP pack in size and profile? Its hard to judge by the pics but it looks roughly the same, maybe slightly longer and more square instead on the more rounded off shape of the 18v packs.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      The XRP battery is more compact and flatter (other than that the "tower" connection part sticking up), where as the 36V is more "boxy" shaped. I'd say the 36V battery is just slightly longer. The lithium battery is bigger in volume. It weighs the same as the XRP. The 36V slides on unlike the XRP battery which sticks into the tool. It slides on, and clicks in. Then to release it, there's a pull-down latch. When you pull the latch, the battery ejects slightly because it's spring-loaded.

                      The batteries seem pretty rugged too, I've already dropped them onto a hard surface and other than a couple of cosmetic dings they work fine and still latch in perfectly. I think with the extra volume and plastic housing of the battery it feels like it would have more of a cushion if you drop it.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
                        LOL no, it's not a DeWobble this time. The chuck is straight. I can't believe that chuck wobble problem they had on the old XRP series and older drills. It was just embarassing. How on earth could they have let that out the door?

                        V28 are good tools and it was a tough decision between between that and the 36V. The 7 1/4" blade was one of the selling points though. So I gave DeWalt another chance and it looks like they have a winner this time.

                        I think the V28 sawzall is as powerful as the 36V, the specs are pretty much the same.

                        How do you find the hammerdrill? most reviews seem to say it's pretty powerful.
                        Sceeter - I haven't had the chance to really put the hammerdrill/driver through it's paces (not the SDS hammer, just the drill that comes with the 28 Volt 4 piece set). I will say this though, it can turn the big bits, I put a 2 9/16's bit on today and did one hole, and it did well. My only conern though, is 600 RPM's for low speed is in my opinion a little fast. IF they geared it more like 400 RPM's, for No.1 speed it would have much more torque, and then keep the high speed right at 1800 RPM's where it currently is. This lower speed would turn the big bits a little slower, but it would be easier on the motor, sort of like having a different rear end is better for towing heavier loads, and you would get much more torque too, so you could turn even larger bits if needed.

                        The main selling points for me for Milwaukee 28Volt over the 36 volt was

                        1) The batteries are made by a local company in Vancouver BC
                        2) The Milwaukee 28 volt platform has a right angle drill
                        3) Milwaukee reputation
                        4) The battery indicator on the batteries
                        5) More than enough power for the things I do as a Plumber - if I was a carpenter then maybe the 36 Volt 7 1/4" circ saw might appeal to me. In fact I contemplated getting the Milwaukee V18 set as well, because that would also suit my needs, but then I thought about getting the 28 volt right angle drill and the SDS hammer drill later on and it would be nice to have the bigger power source in the 28 volts in those tools.
                        6) I felt there would be no point in getting 18 volt tools if I already had a 14.4 XRP Dewalt drill. If you're gonna take a step, it might as well be a bigger one. I wouldn't have gained much advantage in the drill end of things if I had gone to an 18 volt set. I like the V28 drill because it has the capacity and capability to last through big bits & big hole saws (from what I've heard anyways for the most part, and from the little turn I did today).
                        7) There was a 20% off all cordless tools at the Local Home Depot last weekend which prompted me to purchase
                        8) Milwaukee's V28 Sawzall.

                        From what I've heard, those 24 volt DeWalt XRP tools are one of the most underrated cordless lines in the market despite still being a Ni-Cad. The only thing going against them was a bunch of pansy asses who felt they weighed too much for whatever reason, and the fact they costed a lot, on top of the fact that DeWalt didn't put much in that line other than 3 or 4 tools and in promoting them. For example, look at the comparison to the V28 on the Milwaukee website. The 24 Volt Dewalt Ni-cad drill did 42 - 2 9/16's holes, the V28 Lithium Ion drill did 48 holes with the same bit. Consider that if the Ni-cad had been a 28 volt it might have done the same or very close, number of holes, mind you it does weight a bit more, and it might not get as many charge cycles in, but it did reasonably well.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          My experience was on the DC988s (the 18V hammerdrills). I used a 12V XRP once and it was fine. I think it's their old hammerdrill chuck or perhaps it's connection to the shaft.

                          Originally posted by AllanToolGuy
                          Sceeter,

                          Which models had the worst of that problem? It is insane that DeWalt let them out the door. This must be another case where the Quality Control people were sleeping on the job.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Yeah I agree about the gear ratio. 600RPM will be faster for some things, but not necessarily give you the ultra high torque you need for the really really tough applications. The RAD will take care of that which is probably an excellent tool for you anyway because doing plumming you're in between studs and joists.

                            The gearing is one aspect I like (although didn't quite understand why at first) about the 36V drill. But thee torque in 1st gear is just brutal, so it seems to me that they probably aimed it specifically at turning big bits as opposed to an "in-between" range.

                            It's kind of too bad about DeWalt 24V yeah. They never really got their just desserts.

                            It will be a long time before all of the corded guyd out there switch over. Not to mention convincing them, but also to get them to shell out the money at the current prices may not be for everyone until the prices come down. I think the productivity and convenience increase is a good reason to buy them, but tell that to a guy who's been using his Skil for 10 years and still works just fine. I think though if they were to use the new cordless circs. for one day they'd be at Home Depot buying a set that night. It's just getting over that intial hurdle.

                            Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                            Sceeter - I haven't had the chance to really put the hammerdrill/driver through it's paces (not the SDS hammer, just the drill that comes with the 28 Volt 4 piece set). I will say this though, it can turn the big bits, I put a 2 9/16's bit on today and did one hole, and it did well. My only conern though, is 600 RPM's for low speed is in my opinion a little fast. IF they geared it more like 400 RPM's, for No.1 speed it would have much more torque, and then keep the high speed right at 1800 RPM's where it currently is. This lower speed would turn the big bits a little slower, but it would be easier on the motor, sort of like having a different rear end is better for towing heavier loads, and you would get much more torque too, so you could turn even larger bits if needed.

                            The main selling points for me for Milwaukee 28Volt over the 36 volt was

                            1) The batteries are made by a local company in Vancouver BC
                            2) The Milwaukee 28 volt platform has a right angle drill
                            3) Milwaukee reputation
                            4) The battery indicator on the batteries
                            5) More than enough power for the things I do as a Plumber - if I was a carpenter then maybe the 36 Volt 7 1/4" circ saw might appeal to me. In fact I contemplated getting the Milwaukee V18 set as well, because that would also suit my needs, but then I thought about getting the 28 volt right angle drill and the SDS hammer drill later on and it would be nice to have the bigger power source in the 28 volts in those tools.
                            6) I felt there would be no point in getting 18 volt tools if I already had a 14.4 XRP Dewalt drill. If you're gonna take a step, it might as well be a bigger one. I wouldn't have gained much advantage in the drill end of things if I had gone to an 18 volt set. I like the V28 drill because it has the capacity and capability to last through big bits & big hole saws (from what I've heard anyways for the most part, and from the little turn I did today).
                            7) There was a 20% off all cordless tools at the Local Home Depot last weekend which prompted me to purchase
                            8) Milwaukee's V28 Sawzall.

                            From what I've heard, those 24 volt DeWalt XRP tools are one of the most underrated cordless lines in the market despite still being a Ni-Cad. The only thing going against them was a bunch of pansy asses who felt they weighed too much for whatever reason, and the fact they costed a lot, on top of the fact that DeWalt didn't put much in that line other than 3 or 4 tools and in promoting them. For example, look at the comparison to the V28 on the Milwaukee website. The 24 Volt Dewalt Ni-cad drill did 42 - 2 9/16's holes, the V28 Lithium Ion drill did 48 holes with the same bit. Consider that if the Ni-cad had been a 28 volt it might have done the same or very close, number of holes, mind you it does weight a bit more, and it might not get as many charge cycles in, but it did reasonably well.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              i think Milkwaukee just delivered what you were looking for in regards to lower RPM and higher torque. The RAD (V28) in lower in rated at 400 RPS and 1081 in lbs. of torque. Compared to DeWalt's 400 RPM and Does anyone know what the ^$&*@&$# a "Unts Watts Out" is? Is this something that DeWalt invented? Why? I also just notice that DeWalt only has 2.0 amp hrs of run time in their Li-Ion batteries.
                              Unless you are the lead Dog, the scenery does not change...

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                A Watt is a unit of energy as I bet you already know. In the case of "Watts Output" try to think of the drill connected up to a 100% efficent generator. It would be the max amount of power produced with the drill spinning it. In some other parts of the world rather than using horse power they use Watts. Going from electrical energy to motion there are 746 Watts per horse power (text book). I'm not sure of the formula for motion to Watts. Try looking in a technical book if you need to know. The problem is that with a power tool this is measured under ideal lab conditions which are not like out in the field drilling holes. What's needed is a true power output graph. X would be torque and Y would be RPM. I assure you that you won't end up with a straight line.

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