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  • 32 Volt tools? Rumour

    I heard a "rough" rumour that DeWalt will be making 32 volt tools potentially in the future. Just a rumour though. Any other interesting rumours out there?
    I heard this today from a coworker whom I know who talks to a few guys here and there at various suppliers (I'm his apprentice).

  • #2
    I can't confirm this rumor either but the word around here is that Harbor Freight is coming out with a 50V drill/driver for $6.98, $5.58 with a 20% off coupon.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, Dewalt is contemplating filling in between the 18V and 36V. So expect to see even number fill-ins in the next week or so.

      so, by Turkey day, you should see the 20V, 22, 24, 26......36V.

      Comment


      • #4
        why?
        Originally posted by CheekyMonkeyWrench View Post
        Yes, Dewalt is contemplating filling in between the 18V and 36V. So expect to see even number fill-ins in the next week or so.

        so, by Turkey day, you should see the 20V, 22, 24, 26......36V.
        9/11/01, never forget.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've been using 120-volt tools for years, it's hard to imagine wanting to downgrade!!


          Seriously though, for cordless don't these ever-increasing voltage tools add significant weight and also a bit expensive as everyone tries to keep up with this race for more power? Really how much more can one do with a 32-volt tool that they can't do with an 18-volt or 24-volt tool?

          I do have a couple 14.4 volt tools and like their performance and convenience, but as I see these ever-increasing voltage tools hit the market, it makes me think that the lower end will become obsolete quickly as the manufacturer decides to stop producing the lower end batteries. If so, it will confirm my long-standing opinion that buying almost any cordless tool is a rather poor investment in the long run.

          CWS

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          • #6
            OSC,

            I was being sarcastic

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
              I've been using 120-volt tools for years, it's hard to imagine wanting to downgrade!!


              Seriously though, for cordless don't these ever-increasing voltage tools add significant weight and also a bit expensive as everyone tries to keep up with this race for more power? Really how much more can one do with a 32-volt tool that they can't do with an 18-volt or 24-volt tool?

              I do have a couple 14.4 volt tools and like their performance and convenience, but as I see these ever-increasing voltage tools hit the market, it makes me think that the lower end will become obsolete quickly as the manufacturer decides to stop producing the lower end batteries. If so, it will confirm my long-standing opinion that buying almost any cordless tool is a rather poor investment in the long run.

              CWS
              CWS-

              I just purchased a Ridgid 24v cordless set. I may be wrong, but I'm fairly sure that the battery weighs less or at the most, the same as the 18v battery from Ridgid. It's pretty much as heavy as I want to go for a cordless tool. I remember picking up an old Bosch 24v set, and wondering how big my arm needed to be to haul those tools around on a regular basis.

              Comment


              • #8
                I tend to agree with CWS. I don't have a huge need for cordless tools so buying professional grade cordless is pointless for my home owner duties. I mostly work in my small garage woodshop with corded and bench tools. Almost all of my cordless tools are Ryobi, and disposable.

                I firmly believe my Ryobi recip. saw will last me fifty years. Because in fifty years I will have used it about 6 times.

                Here is the latest entry at 20 volts. That leaves 22, 26, 30, 32, and 34 up for grabs.

                http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...seBVCookie=Yes

                erngum

                Comment


                • #9
                  dang i really wish some one would make a 27.66 volt tool that would be awsome
                  9/11/01, never forget.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Most of my tools are still corded but some of my cordless tools have already taken place as the primary tool relegating the corded model as a last ditch backup. I can't imagine ever wasting money on a corded drill again. And who needs a corded impact driver, if they existed(driver not wrench)?

                    18v realistically is not powerfull enough to run most tools. Its fine for drills and tools that don't require as much raw power but its seriously undepowered for saws, rotary hammers and other high power draining tools. Anybody whose used an 18v cordless saw knows this. Most of these tools hardly become heavier once the battery pack is factored in. Cordless tools are only as heavy as the amount of cells you try to pack into them anyway. Makita just came out with an 18v 3.5 pound drill with the same power as the high end models. I don't think you can get a corded drill at that size or with that power. Compact corded drills are quite underepowered. Corded power tools are limited to what you can do with the 120v available at the outlet. As battery and cordless technology keeps improving Im pretty sure we might see cordless power start to outpace corded in many respects. Right now the 36v hammer drill has the same power rating as their most powerfull corded hammer drill yet its like two thirds the size. They also claim the recip saw cut faster than their own high end corded model in tests.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Paladin2025 View Post
                      CWS-

                      I just purchased a Ridgid 24v cordless set. I may be wrong, but I'm fairly sure that the battery weighs less or at the most, the same as the 18v battery from Ridgid. It's pretty much as heavy as I want to go for a cordless tool. I remember picking up an old Bosch 24v set, and wondering how big my arm needed to be to haul those tools around on a regular basis.

                      Its not just Bosch. Dewalt's 24v tools are stupid heavy as well. 24v NiCD tools were just a bad idea and I don't think it ever really cought on judging by the seemingly scarce availability of them. NiCD battery technology is just too heavy and already pushing its practical weight limit at 18v.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                        I heard a "rough" rumour that DeWalt will be making 32 volt tools potentially in the future. Just a rumour though. Any other interesting rumours out there?
                        I heard this today from a coworker whom I know who talks to a few guys here and there at various suppliers (I'm his apprentice).
                        Dewalts site says new 36v tools comming soon. Are you sure he's not refering to that? 32v just doesn't make much sense.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The 36 volt DeWalt Cordless power tools have been out for the past year or so in case you haven't seen them at your local Home Centre or Tool store. But like I said I heard a rumour they may be considering 32 volt tools as well. Why, I don't know? It really doesn't make sense to me. But this is a fairly strong rumour too so I posted this to see what anyone else has heard.

                          In all honesty I think it's cool that most of the tool manufacturers, at least the main cordless ones so far, seem to have a large cordless drill voltage and tool line (e.g. Dewalt 36 volt, Milwaukee 28 volt) which is as light as the previous 18 volt Ni-cads, and then they're looking at improving/retrofitting their existing 18 volt Ni-cad tools with lithium ion batteries and/or redesigning them for a lighter, not as heavy duty or expensive alternative. I think in the long run you're better off to focus on one or two voltage numbers and work with it. It's important then of course to pick a good voltage that can cover your arse for a good selection/tool platform with respect to power available. I'm a huge fan of the Milwaukee 28 volts because of their reputation, the power is more than enough for my needs for the most part as a Plumber, the batteries have indicators on them, and they also have a cordless right angle drill that has big balls which is huge for plumbers, electricians, & sprinklerfitters which for me is huge personally, plus their SDS cordless hammer drill. Those 2 tools I will be adding to my 4 piece set in the next year.

                          What I would honestly like to see, is some of these manufacturers take aim not just at corded tools with their cordless tool platforms, but take a real strong attack on generators for sites that may be on the boonies that don't have power. Build cordless flood lights, perhaps tools that are normally high amperage tools, that run on 2 batteries, OR, design a very high voltage line like a 48 or 60 volt battery pack (yes I know it will be big - but just listen) that you can run things like chop saws, and other normally high amperage, often stationary tools on (i.e. tools that you don't normally carry with you, but rest in one location and do cuts from or work from). But that would be a serious undertaking and I don't know how viable they would be. Or perhaps design a generator with built in charger bays, plus plug ins for tools that are high amperage/power that use or should have 120 volts AC.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            DeWalt's drill might "look" heavy, but it's not. Milwaukee's V28 is rated at 6.7lbs, 36V is 6.9lbs..and a more powerful drill to boot. .2 lbs difference - big friggin deal.

                            In comparison, Milwaukee's 18V "Lok Tor" drill is 6.5lbs and only an 18V!

                            You're not really talking a huge difference in weight here, especially considering the gain in power.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                              The 36 volt DeWalt Cordless power tools have been out for the past year or so in case you haven't seen them at your local Home Centre or Tool store. But like I said I heard a rumour they may be considering 32 volt tools as well. Why, I don't know? It really doesn't make sense to me. But this is a fairly strong rumour too so I posted this to see what anyone else has heard.

                              Sorry I didn't specify too clearly what I was trying to say. I do know the 36v tools have been out for a bit now but only with the more basic tools. Its just that I was browsing the Dewalt site and noticed it said more 36v tools comming soon. I thought perhaps thats what was being refered to in the rumor you heard. I can see Dewalt doing an in between line of the 18 and 36v tools but 32v just sounds so unlikely and pointless.

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