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Bosch has it's 36V Li drills out

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  • #16
    Did you use the side handle? I've find they make an incredible difference in control. I've done big holes without it and it's pretty scary the torque that can come out of nowhere when you hit a bind. Definitely better to use the handle.

    Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
    To put it this way, the torque offered by most modern drills is enough to break your wrist if not careful. As I found out with a DC988 when a hole saw bound and the sucker kicked back so hard I almost broke my wrist. It was sore for about a week.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by CheekyMonkeyWrench View Post
      jeez, when i'm up on the ladder 24ft plus, i wish i had an option for my v28 drill to reduce the weight (when i need a drill with some power).

      Bosch used their heads IMO with that option

      That is the most rediculous thing I have ever heard. Have you ever been up on a ladder before or does it just sound good to you? When you're up on a ladder and you need a drill with 36 volt POWER i.e. TORQUE, rotational force, twisting action, with that much cajones behind it, with some heft, you are going to need to brace yourself in a secure position because if that drill twists or catches and gets out of hand, it won't matter if it's a 36 volt battery that weighs as much as a 2 volt, or an 18 volt, it's going for a dive (remember the tool itself will weigh more because it's supposed to be a heavier duty tool too). Maybe you can test out their 1 story drop toughness?

      As an example, I have used a DeWalt XRP 14.4 drill (what I own), and exact same drill only only the 18 volt version that my company owned, and I found the difference as far as weight to those drills to be virtually negligable. Yeah, you're going to do some stat research and point out they weigh xxx fractions of a pound different or whatever, but honestly, both of those drills had the balls that if I didn't brace myself while drilling up on a ladder, and they caught with a self feed or whatever bit I had in them, they're both going for a dive if they don't chew into the wood first of all and stay there. If you need a 36 volt drill up on a ladder you got even more torque to play with so either way you're going to want to be in a position to pin the drill and hold it securely or you will lose your drill if it catches potentially (if it doesn't grab into whatever you drill into). Like I inferred - if you're not prepared to use this power source, don't buy it. Bosch could have saved themselves a lot of packaging costs, and their customers a lot of confusion if they just made one battery.

      I think you need to ask yourself 1) Does my company actually own a ladder and 2) Do I really need 36 volts of power up on a ladder or do I just want to look cool?

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      • #18
        Scott K WELL SAID

        Think of having to use a heavy corded tool when on a ladder for doing tuff jobs. It's sure no fun having to drag a big roto hammer up a ladder but it has been done many times. Then you have to deal with a heavy duty extension cord. CMW must be another little waaa waaa where 1/4 pound of tool weight really bothers him. Heavy duty cordless tools take power. Then need a big battery or the run time would be almost nothing. I can hear the contractors right now cussing the little 36 Volt battery that constantly end up in the charger. When the job needs a big tool, use it, but when you want to drive a tiny nail you don't want to attempt it with your 10 pounder sledge. On the other hand try driving a RR spike with a 4 Oz Ball Pein hammer. You can do it but think of what it would be like and how long it would take.

        Now back to cordless drills: Get one each. A big bad 36 Volt for the tuff jobs and a nice light compact 12 Volt one for the lighter work.

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        • #19
          Scott K,

          Just don't buy it then


          Allan/Woussko,

          you're strange

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CheekyMonkeyWrench View Post
            Scott K,

            Just don't buy it then


            Allan/Woussko,

            you're strange

            Well Of course I'm not going to buy it. I already own the V28's. I can only walk with my feet but I do have an opinion. I would love to see Bosch produce something that is solid, and to come out with a better/bigger reputation in the power tools market as they seem to be more of a niche in certain things although they do make good jigsaws and descent hammer drills & chipping guns. I think this small/big battery idea is just a gimmick. Instead of building tough, solid, reliable tools, and trying to slowly build a reputation through word of mouth by creating a solid offering, they are offering gimmicks in a market of cordless tools that you don't need gimmicks, just a rock solid offering. Milwaukee is an example of a tool company that built up their reputation by word of mouth, by producing quality products that guys raved about, and their buddies & fellow contractors bought. Milwaukee doesn't sell their soul as much as some other tool manufacturers do in order to get you to buy their power tools either. You either want heavy duty or you don't (some may argue as to whether the latest offerings are as heavy duty as previous offerings due to the switch in ownership, but you get my point).

            Like I said, the idea of 2 batteries sounds good and all that, but you wouldn't find me owning a battery with less run time on a heavy duty cordless tool when there is a slightly heavier battery that gets the job done.

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            • #21
              Scott K,

              i just think it's a nice option (and much cheaper than buying another quality drill), and will help-out with user fatigue.

              Besides, you get 2 batteries and a 3rd via rebate, and you can mix and match.

              If Milwaukee came out with a battery that dropped the weight below a 14v battery, i would pick one up. They would only take about 20 minutes to charge and save on some dead arm.

              btw, Milwaukee is under the guise of a TTI....it's not the same company, as they are positioning themselves to manufacture overseas (asia).

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              • #22
                Originally posted by CheekyMonkeyWrench View Post
                Scott K,

                i just think it's a nice option (and much cheaper than buying another quality drill), and will help-out with user fatigue.

                Besides, you get 2 batteries and a 3rd via rebate, and you can mix and match.

                If Milwaukee came out with a battery that dropped the weight below a 14v battery, i would pick one up. They would only take about 20 minutes to charge and save on some dead arm.

                btw, Milwaukee is under the guise of a TTI....it's not the same company, as they are positioning themselves to manufacture overseas (asia).

                The difference in weight between a 14.4 & 18 volt battery is negligeable.

                Also, the MIlwaukee V28 batteries weigh LESS than an 18 volt battery, somewhere I'm guessing between your typical 14.4 to 18 volt battery.

                If you have problems with user fatigue, it's time to get a membership to the gym. Like I said, its a gimmick, it sounds all pretty, but it's pointless.

                Comment


                • #23
                  lol, so now there isn't a difference in weight between the 2.

                  umm, i held the 2 in my hand and there was a noticeable difference (ergo, which is why they are marketing it as such).


                  like i said, just don't buy it

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                  • #24
                    The difference in weight between a 14.4 bat and an 18v is not that big but it can still be significant enough. Usually about 3/4 to 1 pound less. There is an advantage to the smaller batteries and its size, not weight. Large batteries make it impossible to handle in many tight spots. The idea of compact batteries was a long time comming and I'm quite sure there is a demand for it. The confusion might arise from having two stock 3 different types of product though. I don't think they need one with all larg, one all small, and one combo kit. The drills should just be sold with the large primary packs and the small batteries available as an aftermarket product.

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                    • #25
                      I know I'm strange but bid deal. The thing that's all to easy to not think about here is the weight of the actual tool and how if fits your hand. Even without the battery a big beefy tool like the DeWalt 36 Volt or the Milwaukee V28 is going to feel heavy after using a lighter weight tool. If you don't need super power, how about the Makita 18 Volt Li-Ion series as something to check out? Milwaukee has out the V18 and my bet is that after long use they will feel heavy. Just give yourself a rest when you feel the need.

                      Try to think of it like this. Would you buy a big Kenworth W900 tractor and put a little Diesel engine made for a Pickup in it? Heck no On the other hand the big CAT or Cummins that would make a nice match for the W900 would crush a pickup. And that kind of torque would make minced meat out of the trans real fast.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by CheekyMonkeyWrench View Post
                        lol, so now there isn't a difference in weight between the 2.

                        umm, i held the 2 in my hand and there was a noticeable difference (ergo, which is why they are marketing it as such).


                        like i said, just don't buy it
                        I've Used an 18 volt DeWalt XRP drill and a 14.4 volt DeWalt XRP drill for extended periods during shifts, and the difference between them as far as user fatigue was negligeable. It's a non-issue. My 28 volt Milwaukee drill, while it is a stout drill, and definately not the lightest, at the end of the day fatigue isn't a factor. If you're worried about fatigue, hit the gym, and avoid the McDonalds drive thru next time. Maybe then you can buy a real drill with some real battery life to it, and actaully have the pipes to use it at work during the day. Until then consider a white collar desk job. Maybe you could get a job cutting hair, just make sure you buy some really light scissors and your clippers aren't too heavy, or you'll have issues with user fatigue.

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                        • #27
                          Scott,

                          Hit the gym? Why, when I can flex my internet muscles like you

                          Like I said, voice your displeasure and refrain from buying one....that will let Bosch know.

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                          • #28
                            The smaller battery is pretty insignificant in the weight of the overall tool.

                            Originally posted by CheekyMonkeyWrench View Post
                            Scott K,

                            i just think it's a nice option (and much cheaper than buying another quality drill), and will help-out with user fatigue.

                            Besides, you get 2 batteries and a 3rd via rebate, and you can mix and match.

                            If Milwaukee came out with a battery that dropped the weight below a 14v battery, i would pick one up. They would only take about 20 minutes to charge and save on some dead arm.

                            btw, Milwaukee is under the guise of a TTI....it's not the same company, as they are positioning themselves to manufacture overseas (asia).
                            I don't think the lighter battery is going to make a lot of difference in how a HUGE 36 volt tool handles. On the other hand I really like the idea of Bosch coming out with the little 10.8V driver. That is a nice pocket tool you can reach for when the job doesn't require heaps of torque or runtime. I'd like to see them release a real drill (not just a driver) with similar specs.



                            http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-PS20-2-L...3?ie=UTF8&s=hi

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