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  • Something fulfilling...

    ...about cutting down a tree branch in your backyard, using your $25 chainsaw milliing adapter from Ebay and making some nice honey locust hardwood.

    Ya know, I've had the log sitting for the summer but I milled it this weekend and immediately ran it through the planer. I wonder if that was better than waiting for full dry? Came out beautiful...





    This was just a branch. Amazing wood. It weighs and feels like a rock. Some local wood reclaimer guy said that locust will last 100yrs or so - even buried. I probably won't be around to verify

    Cheap little chainsaw mill thing worked better than anticipated too.

  • #2
    Nice pronounced grain, should make something very useful.

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    • #3
      Very nice, the trunk must be huge if those are branches. Be careful using branches as they are what is called reaction wood. Best way to describe it is to hold a tape measure out at 10' or so, it droops toward the ground. The branches compensate for gravity by contracting on the top and expanding on the bottom. When cut and slabbed they tend to warp as they dry

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      • #4
        Years ago, you were still able to get locust fencing. I haven't been able to find it as of late.

        I put up a locust fence when I was still in high school (about 9 years ago) and it has yet to be compromised.

        do you have a pic of that attachment for the chain saw?

        Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
        Very nice, the trunk must be huge if those are branches. Be careful using branches as they are what is called reaction wood. Best way to describe it is to hold a tape measure out at 10' or so, it droops toward the ground. The branches compensate for gravity by contracting on the top and expanding on the bottom. When cut and slabbed they tend to warp as they dry
        Dubs,
        Is there a process to minimize the effects of the warping?
        Last edited by CheekyMonkeyWrench; 11-06-2006, 09:54 PM.

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        • #5
          (about cutting down a tree branch in your backyard,) $10.00 bucks...( using your $25 chainsaw milliing adapter from Ebay) $25.00... ( making some nice honey locust hardwood.)...........Priceless!!!!
          Everyone thinks there problems are more important than yours!

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          • #6
            Not much you can do with reaction wood, the stresses are introduced into the wood as it grows. Some branches may be fine but why waste the time and space on branches that are likely to yield wonky wood.
            You should coat the ends of your stack with a sealer, there are commercial sealers or I have heard that Exterior Latex house paint works fine.

            Here is some good reading material

            http://www.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/for/for55/for55.htm

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            • #7
              Yeah I guess I'll see on the reaction thing. My thought was on the properties of this tree itself. The tensile strength of this wood is incredible based on my observation when cutting it down.

              This was the base part of an approx 30' branch...and it was growing primarily verticle.

              I do use a wood sealer from Woodcraft. Does the trick if you get it on right away.

              Here's a pic of the kind I have:



              Look on Ebay under 'chainsaw mill'...I think Harbor Freight sells them too.

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