Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

TS3650 Problem?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TS3650 Problem?

    Hello All,

    I have been using my TS3650 a little here and there with no problem. A week ago I used a Stackable Dado to cut dados for a workbench I was building. The saw was not constantly on, though it was on and off regularly for 45 minutes or so.

    Before installing the Dado, and for a while after I started using it, the blade would get up to full speed quickly, with just a slight hesitation after turning it on. About half way through my cutting, when I turned on the power, it turned slowly for a few seconds before getting up to full speed, like it was winding up. It still does this with the regular blade. I have a dust collector attached while I'm cutting, and though the motor seemed pretty warm, it did not appear to be abnormally hot.

    Is this something to be concerned about? Has anyone else experienced this issue?

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Could be that your start capacitor centrifugal relay is jammed with dust. Blow out the motor especially the back and see if that solves the problem. Other than that you could have a bad cap or bad relay (read - time for service center)

    Comment


    • #3
      Did check the tension of the belt? It is possible if belt tension was lost the belt is slipping on the pulley at start up.

      Comment


      • #4
        As to the hesitation----are your DC and saw on the same circuit? That would be very typical of what you would see if the DC was already going when you started the saw. I realize (since I'm in the same boat) that if all you have is one circuit---you learn to live with it.

        As to other causes, previous posts have also addressed the issue---what size dado set are you running? A heavy duty 8" is also a lot of metal to get turning.
        Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks, those are all great suggestions, and I'll check them out. Yes, I am running the DC on the same circuit, and it is a 8" dado, though the slow start started after I used it for a while, and continues with a single blade.

          Thanks again.

          Comment


          • #6
            In that case, check out the sawdust in the motor build-up-----also, make sure you didn't swap out any extension cords---which could also have such an effect.
            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              You can probably cross off sawdust buildup in the motor as one of the causes. The TEFC motor that is standard on the 3650 shouldn't allow a sawdust buildup to occur. But, that doesn't rule out the possibility that something else could be wrong with the motor.
              Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

              Comment


              • #8
                Here's a good example of what I'm talking about regarding the effectiveness of some of the help you will get here.

                You have two apparently senior members giving conflicting answers to a thread they have no sincere interest in.

                They then leave the thread and go off to neutralize other threads where other newer members might have gotten good info from other users if other users had not been put off and bored by their bullishness while only trying to pass themselves off as authorities.

                In the end dbird never got any conclusive answer and probably doesn't even watch the thread anymore.

                dbird - ya oughtta have hung in and pressed these guys to come to some conclusion about the dust build up thing. Which one did you end up trusting the most?

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would guess you're not getting adequate power to your saw. I had similar issues with my contractor saw when I first set it up.

                  I got a dedicated 15 amp outlet and it took care of my problems. Also - make sure you are using the proper gauge of wire in your extension cord according to your manual.

                  Power cord with that doesn't have the proper wire gauge could cause the same result

                  Jake

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    dbird,

                    Are you still having problems with the motor on your tablesaw? Seems a fact check is in order since you're being asked about your extension cord, but you never said you were using one.

                    Before I go on, have you called Ridgid and explained the issue you are(or were)having?

                    Although I never practiced the trade, I studied A/C and refrigeration years ago, which gave me some practical knowledge about motors. The type of motor that is on the 3650 is called a Capacitor-Start, Capacitor-Run (CSR). The trouble-shooting suggestions that wbrooks gave you makes sense, except that the 3650's motor it also a Totally Enclosed Fan Cooled motor. Therefore the start relay could not be jammed with dust as badgerdave pointed out. That's not to say there is not a problem with it.

                    Now you also said you were using your Dust Collector on the same circuit. Have you tried starting the saw without the DC turned on? CSR motors use voltage to start-up, rather that current. If there is a significant voltage drop, this may cause what you have been experiencing.

                    If you don't get the answers or troubleshooting suggestions from Ridgid support, I would suggest that you might want to upgrade your electrical outlets. I work in a basement shop, making electrical upgrades relatively easy, and I have the knowledge and experience to do it safely myself, so I won't belittle how difficult or expensive this could be for you. However, you will find that (if the saw's motor does not have a physical problem) your saw will start-up quickly, your lights probably will not dim, and you will be very unlikely to trip the circuit breaker, ever.
                    When wired for 220v, it is more likely that the thermal protector on your motor will shut the motor off under too heavy load.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks to all for their input. I've been down hard for the past week with the flu, and have not been able to get back in the shop yet.

                      Yes, I am using an extension cord, and while I'm not sure of the gauge, it is a heavy-duty cord.

                      I am having problems with the garage circuit in general (the GFI will not reset), and have used another house plug for certain tools, though can't recall if this was the case when I first encountered the problem with the saw. Based on the above comments, it appears that it may be a general power-flow issue, and will test using different circuits once I fix the GFI issue.

                      When the issue first started, the motor seemed pretty warm, and I wanted to rule out the possibility of motor damage.

                      Thanks again, and I'll post updates.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If a GFCI (formerly known as GFI) breaker or outlet will not reset, this is by design as they are no longer capable of providing Ground Fault protection. This device must be replaced.

                        "According to a study conducted by the American Society of Home Inspectors (published in IAEI News, November/December 1999), 21% of GFCI circuit breakers and 19% of GFCI receptacles tested did not provide GFCI protection. Yet, the circuit remained energized! In the examined cases, failures of the GFCI sensing circuits were mostly due to damage to the internal transient voltage surge protection (metal-oxide varistors) that protect the GFCI sensing circuit. This damage resulted from voltage surges from lightning and other transients. In areas of high-lightning activity, such as Southwest Florida, the failure rate for GFCI circuit breakers was more than 57%"

                        GFCI breakers and outlets are required in certain locations by the National Electrical Code.

                        Check that gauge of the cord! Often there will be text on the side of the cord that tells what the gauge is. Also try other cords. I have seen pictures of properly gauged cords that had burst into flames! Many of these are slapped out in China, no guarantees.

                        [ 02-23-2005, 01:36 AM: Message edited by: DK ]

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X