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  • somethings wrong

    I've had the TS 3650 for almost three months now. . My first table saw and absolutely no experience using one, so you see where I am here. HELPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!..oops, but that's about right. I can't get a square cut out of it I've checked the square of the blade with the left miter slot.I've lineed up the splitter, squared the fence with the left mitre slot tapped it out a 64th but got a better cut without it. i've checked the squre of the blade to the table and have taken the blade off and laid it on melamine to see if it was bent, Everything checks out ok. But oh my gosh,yoyu should see how crazy these cuts are . At least a full 8th of an inch on cross cuts. Rip cuts got a bit better when i realized that i had gotten spoiled with the jointer and wasn't holding the workpiece tight to the fence,stil the cut literally undulates. I'm going out and try again but i'd sure appreciate any help i can get

    NUBY


    p.s. it's not a thin kerf blade

  • #2
    For one thing, most OEM miter gauges aren't very good. Your problem with crosscuts could be caused by the fact that your miter gauge isn't set at exactly 90 degrees to the blade. The blade will also tend to grab your workpiece and move it if you don't have it held down properly.

    It sounds like you have identified a problem with your feed technique when making rip cuts. It's easy for the workpiece to wander away from the fence when ripping so care must be taken to ensure that the workpiece stays flush against the fence. Practice making rip cuts and pretty soon it will become second nature to keep the workpiece riding flush along the fence.

    One other thing you might want to consider is replacing the OEM blade if you haven't already. Again like the miter gauge, OEM saw blades tend to be of a lesser quality solely because it keeps the cost of the saw down. Dedicate crosscut and rip blades are best but, if you don't like to change blades constantly, a quality general purpose or combination blade will perform better than the OEM blade ever will.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Blade may have run-out

      Hey Nuby,

      When I first bough my TS2400, I replaced the OEM blade with "new" blade that had been laying around for a few years (still in original packaging). I laid the blade on a flat surface and all looked good. However, I had a devil of a time squaring the new blade. I was using a dial indicator and couldn't get the thing to be less than 3 or 4 thou off.

      Bought an actual new blade, put it on, squared right up easy as pie. Even though my first blade looked flat, it had enough run-out that I couldn't get it squared up.

      Jon
      Still able to count to 21....

      Comment


      • #4
        Sounds like the stock is sliding on the miter guage fence. If you haven't done so already, attach a wood fence to the miter guage fence, make sure it is square to the table top. Cut some ~150 grit PSA sandpaper and stick it to the wooden aux fence. This will keep the stock from slipping side to side during the cut.
        HTH
        ken
        Poplar Branch Wood Crafts

        Comment


        • #5
          this is just in general for table saws,

          but put a framing square on the front edge of the table and see if the blade is sitting square on the table, IF not one will have to realign "either the table or the motor/blade assemble" to each other,
          another way to check is to measure from the miter gage slot to the blade and see if it the same at front to back of the blade,

          if the blade is not sitting in the saw square you will not be able to use the miter gage and have a satisfactory cut, you can make the ripping work by aligning the fence to the blade but it is a mess to work with,

          and if the blade is square at/to the front of the saw and not the miter gages slots, (and if that is the problem align to the miter slots as the fence can be aligned to the slots as well) (but you may want to contact the manufacture and see about a replacement or warranty work).

          (on many saws the motor and blade assembley bolts to the under neither of the table and can be losened and aligned)
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            page 23 of the manual tells you how to adjsut for
            parallelism for you saw, (what I was talking about in the post above).

            http://www.ridgid.com/CatalogDocs/TS3650_6498_eng.pdf
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment


            • #7
              There are two possibilites that I see to your problem. The first is mechanical - something wrong with your equipment. This looks like the possibilities have pretty well been covered so I'll not comment. The other is technique. I had the same problem with cutting straight and true as you, but discovered that I was the problem, not the saw. Here's what I did to solve it. For ripping I started using feather boards (horizontal) for every cut that I could. If the work piece is narrower than the table top this works every time. Put the featherboard as close to the centerline of the arbor as you can so that the workpiece is held against the fence all the way through the saw. Since I'm blind this keeps my hands out of harm's way as well. For crosscutting, I use a crosscut sled. The sandpaper along the edge is a great idea, but also you can use a stop on the fence closest to you to insure the workpiece is not moving sideways as it passes through the blade.
              Hope this helps.

              Blind Bill

              Comment


              • #8
                The miter gauge that came with my TS3650 was both out of square and loose in the miter slot. There are adjustment screws on the miter gauge to allow you to adjust it to perfectly square, but that doesn't correct the slop between the gauge and slot. My solution was to abandon the OEM gauge and buy an Incra 100se aftermarket miter gauge/fence. It is worth the money if you really want precision.

                By the way, a blade that is not perfectly flat will still cut perfectly square. The cut may be rough, but not out of square. Wobbler type dado blades are capable of cutting square sided dados even though the motion of the blade has "runout" of a half inch or more. It is only the bottom of the dado cut that is rounded.

                Art

                Comment


                • #9
                  Getting it Right

                  As soon as I post my thanks, i'm going out to do page 23. Alas, another wakeup call :rolleyes. Taking everyone's advise, showed me that I wasn't paying attention. Not smart at all I'd say about 80% of the problem is gone. Holding tight to the fence all the way. Readjusting the rear rail & aligning the splitter with it and most of all being aware of everything that needs to go on and making sure it does go on in the manner that it should. I'm working on the mitre guage now, redoing what turned out to be a less than adequate aux fence job (waiting for the sandpaper to dry now) . Turns out that holding tight to the oem guage produced a much better cut, so I had to look at one of my first creations. It still seems that i get that low area on one side of the cut. About 1/32 now. Spent my fun money for this month, but next month it's a new mitre guage.

                  Thanx Guys

                  NUBY

                  P.S. I'm learning..... There are some great teachers here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ck the B/G

                    See if the blade guard is adjusted correct to keep wood from pulling away from fence during cutting.

                    My blade guard divider toward back of the saw was allowing the wood to pull away from the fence because I was not putting fence pressure on wood already cut by the blade. A suction cup handle or simalar to force wood against the fence is the key. If you are pushing the wood toward the fence from left side, you are pushing against the blade guard divider and not the fence. If you did this without blade guard, the blade would bind and you would certainly have issues there and dangerous ones at that.
                    When in doubt, unplug the saw.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      First thing: DON"T square the miter guage to the blade. Squaring the miter gauge to the blade is the simple way but extends any error there to the miter gauge fence. If you stop and look at what is happening, it can't be any other way. Use an artists square to align the miter gauge to the miter slot.

                      Tom Hintz has a great review on just this subject here:
                      http://www.newwoodworker.com/squrmitrgag.html

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