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crosscut sled help

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  • crosscut sled help

    Today I spent part of the day making a crosscut sled that doesnt make good crosscuts . I went with a 2x4 fence (at the front as opposed to the rear to increase capacity) and used plywood for the base and oak as the "runner" that fits in the mitre track.

    I ran a few test pieces and it was off. Any tips on how to correct my errors?

    It was created as follows:

    base: 18 x 24 (1/2" plywood)
    fence: 24" (2x4)

    The fence was simply attached to the base with counter sunk screws and some wood glue. I then counter sunk and screwed/glued a 3/8 x 3/4 runner which fits snuggly in the mitre gauge slot. I ran the whole assembly though the blade to get a zero clearance edge. I chccked the fence for 90 degrees with the base using a combination level and everything seemed okay. Did i miss something? Why are my crosscuts 1/8" (or more) off? I was hoping to use this jig to square off panels for cabinets/etc (since I don't have a panel saw like I do in my cabinet making class shop).

    thanks in advance for your advice.

  • #2
    I would check the runners for square,
    would it be better to cut a light dado in the plywood base to put the miter gage runners into using the saw to set the alignment,
    is the ply wood square?

    and this is off the subject, but I never had the desired results with a sled that I thought I should have, but have not retry-ed one in 20 years, but I have a big radial arm saw so I had the ability to square a small panel most of the time,
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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    • #3
      Is the fence square to the blade?

      Too late cause you have glued the fence to the base you say.

      Did you check to see if your saw is aligned before you made the sled?

      Any adjustments made to the saw afterwards will cause misalignment between the blade and the sled.

      You need the blade parallel to the miter slot before you use it to trim the sled base square. Then install the sled fence sq. to the runner.
      ---------------
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      • #4
        Originally posted by franklin pug;63431 I ra
        I chccked the fence for 90 degrees with the base using a combination level and everything seemed okay. Did i miss something? Why are my crosscuts 1/8" (or more) off? .
        Comination squares are notorious for not being absolutely square, especially as the tightening hardware and the groove wears. Check again with a framing square or try-square. Also, check your framing square for square. I bought a new Johnson framing square that is off about 1/32 on the short leg or 1/8th on the long. Measure between the 12" mark on the short leg to the 16" mark on the long leg. If the distance is not EXACTLY 20" your square is off. My guess is that your miter slot runners are not square to your fence. Measure against your saw kerf using the 3, 4, 5 triangle method. (any multiple times 3 and 4 on the square legs, and the same multiple of 5 for the hypotenuse).
        It is getting hard to fine accurate measuring tools. 1/8" off in 24" can be dealt with building a deck or framing a structure when it only involves the width of a 2 x4, but it really sucks for furniture.
        Also make sure your fence is straight. If you didn't pre-drill, screws may have pulled it off on one end or the other as they follow the path of least resistance, and will push a board over if they hit some hard grain.

        Go
        Practicing at practical wood working

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        • #5
          thanks dor the tips - i'll give it another go

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          • #6
            to check a square for squareness, put on a straight edge, and mark a line, and then flip over the square and check the line if it lines up it is square and if not it not,

            framing squares can usually be adjusted by taking a center punch and making a dimple in the heel of the square either on the inside or the out side of it depending on if the tongue and blade of it it need to be spread or narrowed,

            http://zo-d.com/stuff/how-do-i/how-t...ng-square.html
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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