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  • Dado blade or router?

    What is better to make a dado cut? I have a router but not a dado blade. Should I get a dado or just ude the router?

  • #2
    Either works...it's really a matter of preference. I have both capabilities and prefer the dado blade....I think it's faster, and it definitely gives more size flexibility.

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    • #3
      As Tom says, either works, but I am the opposite of him--I prefer the router. If you are putting a dado in largeer pieces, it is easier to hadle a router than a large piece of material on a table saw. ( Plus, I like to see what I am doing) It is really a matter of personal preference. Jim

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      • #4
        Thanks guys. I really didn't want to fork out $100-150 for a new blade if I didn't need to at this point. I can look at this again when I get more tools that I want.

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        • #5
          I am a novice so someone please correct me if I am wrong. The only disadvanatge making a dado with a router is that you may have to make two passes with the router. I guess this depends deep or wide the dado will be, regardless if it is plywood or hardwood.

          If you have a 3hp router, you shoudd be able to do it in 1 pass.
          Last edited by dieselgg; 12-05-2006, 11:40 AM.

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          • #6
            I can't remember exactly where I read this, but either here on the Ridgid board or somewhere I read that you can't, or aren't supposed to, use a dado blade in Europe. Does anyone know anything about that (prohibited by the EU equivalent to OSHA or what)?

            Thanks,

            CWS

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            • #7
              CWS, it seems to me that I've read in the past that it is not legal to sell a table saw in Great Britain that has an arbor that is capable of mounting a dado blade. I also believe that it's also illegal to sell dado sets as well. I don't know if that's the case throughout all of Europe.
              Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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              • #8
                bigworm, if cost is holding you back from buying a dado set, take a hard look at this set.

                I've had this set for a number of years now with very good results. The bottoms of the dado cut are so close to flat that I would not hesitate to call them flat bottomed. It's important though that you get this exact set and not the other set that they also offer. This set is only available through the catalog sales website and is not sold at the retail stores. The only drawback to this set is that its heavy. The chippers are a full plate style and not the wing style that sets like the Freud SD200 Series has. Bottom line though is for $30+freight this set does as good a job of cutting dados as sets costing many times as much.
                Last edited by BadgerDave; 12-05-2006, 03:35 PM.
                Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                • #9
                  Harbor Freight dado set

                  Actually, I bought this same set at the retail location in Independence, MO. It works just fine for my applications, so I can heartily add my recommendations to BadgerDave's.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
                    bigworm, if cost is holding you back from buying a dado set, take a hard look at this set.

                    I've had this set for a number of years now with very good results. The bottoms of the dado cut are so close to flat that I would not hesitate to call them flat bottomed. It's important though that you get this exact set and not the other set that they also offer. This set is only available through the catalog sales website and is not sold at the retail stores. The only drawback to this set is that its heavy. The chippers are a full plate style and not the wing style that sets like the Freud SD200 Series has. Bottom line though is for $30+freight this set does as good a job of cutting dados as sets costing many times as much.

                    Well what about the cut? Will it be about the same with both or will one give me a better (flat) cut? I was also wooking to get the Dewalt set off Amazon but if I can just use the router table I am building then I can get some other toys. If I don't get a set right now will I be missing out?

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                    • #11
                      IMO, you'll be very limited in the size of the workpiece when it comes to cutting dado's using only a router table.

                      As far as your quality of cut is concerned I can't really say as I have no idea what the quality level is of the router bits that you intend to use. I've cut dado's using both the TS and router and basically I'd rate the quality of cut to be about the same.
                      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                      • #12
                        Glad someone asked this question. I just got a TS3650. I also own 2 routers. Always made dados with a router in the past and was considering a dado blade. But, since the routers work fine, I'd think the inconvenience of having to remove the throat and install the dado might not be worth the trouble. So, I think I'll skip on the dado blade and get a good 60 tooth+ carbide blade for my TS3650. I'm not real big about the blade that came with it.

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                        • #13
                          I have both, and for me it really depends on the mood I'm in. If I feel ambitious, I'll use the stacked dado set. If I'm lazy, I'll use the router

                          Out of the two, I find that I use the router more often. Mainly because I have the Incra Pro II on my table saw extension, so I can make very accurate dados faster than I can with my dado set.

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                          • #14
                            Pragmatism at work...

                            I use both the dado stack and router, depending on the project. Since I have more workpiece support on the table saw, I'll generally use the dado set when cutting dados in long or wide pieces. If I'm cutting short dados, or just a few, I'll often use the router since I can change the router bit faster than I can change to a dado set in the table saw and set it up. Stopped dados are, obviously, a router only item. So are dados where the bottom has to be absolutely flat.

                            I also use a lot of jigs to cut dados with the plunge router. It works great for long mortises and grooves across the grain of very long stock. Sometimes it's just easier to move the tool over the workpiece than moving the workpiece over the tool. I try to label and save these jigs, but I'm not always faithful to that cause and I end up making the same jig over again a few months later.

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                            • #15
                              Nice to see other harbor fans in here. I can drive about 15 min across town and pick up that set in the store .I am so happy they put a store up by me.My dad has been shopping HF for too many years through the mail.New generation i guess i get the store to shop in lol.

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