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  • #16
    I used TightBond III for the first time on a cutting board last week and am quite happy thus far. I was planing the board down after about an hour of drying time (put it near the fire while drying).
    Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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    • #17
      Another vote for Titebond III.

      Jim.

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      • #18
        I've used titebond II and III and the glue joint is stronger than the wood.
        I'm sure there is other stuff stronger than titebond, but what's the point?
        www.TheWoodCellar.com

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        • #19
          Yay!!! I was gonna ask the same question! So...now the boards are together. What kind of finish would be good?
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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          • #20
            vasandy,
            I use mineral OIL, not mineral spirits. Any food safe oil should work. I found the mineral oil in the pharmacy section of WalMart.
            If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

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            • #21
              From what I have read, the commercial wood boards are finished with a mix of 5 parts mineral oil + 1 part paraffin. (Melt the paraffin into the mineral oil in a double boiler, pour on the board and wipe off excess after about 15 min. Repeat until no more penetrates. Then let dry and buff off with a soft rag). Do not run it through a dishwasher.
              Vegetable oils (especially those like Wesson and Mazola) can turn rancid after a while, which is why mineral oil is preferred. The paraffin helps seal it all in, preventing juices and blood from penetrating into the wood.
              I read one article that stated that some woods like white oak have enough residual tannic acid to kill many bacteria as long as its cleaned with soapy water after use. It also stated that wood was preferable to plastic because the microscopic cuts in the plastic would trap food products and were impossible to clean out. Guess there's many opinions out there.

              My $.0002 worth
              Go
              Practicing at practical wood working

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              • #22
                I like tung oil. It's food safe, waterproof, and even has a nice smell. It doesn't darken with age or exposure to sunlight, and it's a cinch to refinish later.

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                • #23
                  gofor,

                  Not knowing how much finish it would take, can your recipe be mixed in bulk then reheated later for another project? I would like to try the recipe. Would you have an internet resource with more info? I appreciate the help.

                  greenandgrowing,

                  I may have to give your finish a try too. Do you just pour it on, let it set and wipe off the excess? Thanks...
                  If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

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                  • #24
                    Here's a reference that describes using beeswax instead of paraffin, but they are interchangeable. For the beeswax ref, look under the 'Maintaining ..." section:

                    http://whatscookingamerica.net/Cutti...s/AllAbout.htm

                    Also, I revisited another forum that I saw a reference on, and the dwell time of the mixture setting on the surface was much longer than 15 min (sorry for the mis-information), more like over night. From what I understand, once the wax is dissolved in the mineral oil, it stays in suspension, however heating the mixture some helps the penetration. Should work well nukin' it in the microwave, as its a food-safe coating.

                    Go
                    Practicing at practical wood working

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by amcnerl View Post
                      greenandgrowing,

                      I may have to give your finish a try too. Do you just pour it on, let it set and wipe off the excess? Thanks...
                      That's one option, and it's what I do on finely grained closed-pore wood. On most projects, however, I sand it in with 220 grit wet/dry drywall mesh. The tung makes a slurry with the fine sawdust particles and creates an incredible feel to the finished project. It also enhances the chatoyance, making the wood glow like tiger-eye.

                      On very course grained or open-pore woods, like red oak, I use a filler, sand down to 220, then sand in the tung oil as above. On all projects, I put on a coat of tung, let it sit for 15-20 minutes, wipe off excess, and let it sit overnight. On porous woods, like red oak, I wipe it down several times over the first few hours to remove the bleed-out from the pores.

                      After sitting overnight, I lightly burnish each coat with steel wool, wipe off the dust, then apply another coat. I like to build up at least 4 or 5 coats, but very porous woods might require more before they stop absorbing. Alternatively, if you have enough tung oil and an airtight basin you can soak small pieces in tung oil overnight, then wipe off the next day. Let cure for 24 hours and burnish. Tupperware containers work great for smallish pieces, but don't use the wife's. Get your own. Don't ask how I know. If the tung oil starts getting a bit thick, add mineral spirits to thin it out. The mineral spirits will evaporate, leaving the food-safe tung oil behind. Leftover tung oil can be reclaimed and reused by pouring it back into the can.

                      Remember, though, that tung oil does not give you a gloss finish. About the best that you can hope for with several coats and thorough burnishing is a satin to semi-gloss. It will, however, give you "depth" to the grain. It won't be shiny, but it will look like you can dive right into it. I love the effect. If you want a glossier finish, you can use a couple coats of paste wax to shine it up.

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                      • #26
                        Thanks to you both. This gives me a couple more options. Can't wait to try them. All I've been using is mineral oil.
                        If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

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