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  • What glue?

    Hey guys what kinda glue do you use? I have seen Gorilla Glue a few times. Is this a good choice? If not what do you use?

  • #2
    I've used Tightbond III. It's great but has a short open time (about 8min). For big projects needing longer open time I like DAP plastic resin glue (30min open time). I just don't like having to mix it.

    Just my 2 cents

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    • #3
      I probably use Titebond II for 90% of my applications, Titebond III for 5% and all other types of glue and epoxy for the remaining 5%.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        Titebond II for most wood projects and Polyurethane glue for exterior projects...

        and hot glue for tacking things in place...

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        • #5
          I use Tighbond II and III for the vast majority of my projects and Polyurethane glue for outside projects.

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          • #6
            well I guess everyone uses about the same thing. Nobody has tried Gorilla Glue? So can I get Tighbond II and III at HD or Lowes?

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            • #7
              Gorilla Glue is polyurethane glue. The local HD's here sell both the TiteBond II and III. Don't know about Lowes though, don't have any here.
              Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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              • #8
                glues I use

                I have used and use gorilla glue. I also have used the
                other brands of poly type glues too. Elmer and others have also jumped on the poly glue band wagon. I suspect they are all quite similar.

                Be sure to wear gloves and do not be generous with the glue, as a little does go a long way.

                I recently built a doggie ramp for use with a ford Explorer. I used 1x2 for the materials with a 1/2 plywood and carpet for the ramp. I used the Lowe's sale brand of poly glue. I squeezed a small bead on one side, spread it with an acid brush and sprayed water on the opposite piece, it's dry here in Arizona.

                I have found the gorilla glue does run out of the bottle a bit faster than some of the other brands, I also notice it "foams" a bit more too. This can either be good or bad. I have not done any testing to determine the strength variations of the various brands.

                I also use titebond wood glue I think it is titebond-2

                I have started to become comfortable using the gorilla type glues and really like the open time to set the project.

                Cactus Man

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                • #9
                  Caveat for polyurethane glue

                  Gorilla glue, and other polyurethane glues, are great for certain applications. Several years ago, I built a telescope mirror grinding machine. Since the wooden components would be constantly subjected to the torque of the motors, the oscillation of the swing arms, and the water and abrasive slurries used to grind the mirror, I went with polyurethane glue. It has great weather resistance, retains a degree of flexibility, and helps fill voids as it cures and swells slightly (which is nice when you're edge-gluing plywood).

                  Having said that, you'll find very few interior furniture projects that call for polyurethane glue. As the poly swells, it can push apart joints. It's also a bit more difficult, in my opinion, to clean up squeeze-out. On all my interior furniture projects I use Tightbond II or III. On most of my exterior furniture projects, I use Tightbond III. All are available at Home Depot.

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                  • #10
                    Glues

                    In addition to selecting glues based on interior/exterior use, I look at open time and color. You need to able to assemble at a fast pace with a glue that has a 5 minute open time. I often use dark glues for tabletops.

                    Titebond's web site is a great source of information.

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                    • #11
                      I've used Gorilla glue on a couple of projects, great strength. As mentioned, a little goes a long way and definitely wear gloves. What I done for spreading out glue is took an old foam brush and pulled the foam off. This left me with a thin flexible plastic 'tongue' that works wonders spreading as thin or thick a layer as you want. It's easy to clean afterwards since most glue doesn't stick to it. For most projects Tightbond III is my preference.
                      If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks guys grat info. I just started woodworking so I was thinking you would use the same gule for just about everything. Thanks again

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                        • #13
                          Cutting board glue

                          Hi,

                          What would you guys recommend for gluing a cutting board together?

                          FSK

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by FSK View Post
                            Hi,

                            What would you guys recommend for gluing a cutting board together?

                            FSK
                            Titebond III would be my first choice with Titebond II my second.
                            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                            • #15
                              fsk,

                              I've made several cutting boards and use TightBond III exclusively. Plenty of time before it starts to set and you can work the materials after 30 minutes of drying, depending on temp and humidity.
                              If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

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