Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Miter Gauge for table saw

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Miter Gauge for table saw

    I am looking for a Miter Gauge for my TS3612. I have looked at the Incra miter gauges. Does anyone have an opinion on a decent miter gauge. I am looking to all but do away with my Miter Saw due to space conflicts. The only thing I want to use the my existing Miter Saw for is long boards.
    Any feedback would be appreciated
    Thank you
    Tim

  • #2
    Tim89s,
    The Incra 1000se seems to be one of the hottest after market miter gauges on the block for the money... There are ton's of proud owners that proclaim it's greatness daily on many of the different woodworking forums I visit... This is the gauge that I have just recently got myself to use on my Ridgid saw...

    If you are interested in this gauge and hurry, you can save $10.00 until Fathers Day...

    Checkout this:

    Fathers Day Special...Save up to $50.

    From now until Fathers Day, you can save on any order with Woodpeckers. Just go to our website at http://www.woodpeck.com , enter the appropriate coupon code listed below and save!


    Save $10 on orders over $100 - coupon code take10
    Save $20 on orders over $200 - coupon code take20
    Save $30 on orders over $300 - coupon code take30
    Save $40 on orders over $400 - coupon code take40
    Save $50 on orders over $500 - coupon code take50

    Offer expires June 15, 2003. Not valid on any prior orders. Only one coupon per order please.
    Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm in agreement with Big. You'll want a Miter Gauge that can be adjusted to be tight in the slot, and one with positive indexing. The 1000SE has both these features, it also swings +/-90 degrees, has a 1/10th degree vernier adjustment, and has a 18"-32" telescoping fence with full featured Stop. For that price with those features IMHO I don't think anything comes close.

      David

      Comment


      • #4
        I would like to add that many of wood workers prefer the 1000 series due to a weight factor. The 2000 and 3000 series are heavier. In some cases I'm sure it has it's benefits. But for the most part, that is why the 1000SE is so popular. Tremendous features and light weight for the hard earned buck. One day...when I have to stop buying diapers, I'll have one myself!
        John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

        Comment


        • #5
          Doesn't the 3612 come with a miter gauge?
          Why would you want to replace it?
          www.TheWoodCellar.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Stock Miter Gauges are not one of the most precise tools that manufacturers supply with their table saws. The Ridgid is one of the better ones, but it still moves sideways in the miter slot. Trying to precisely return to an angle or back to 90 degrees is down to eyeballing. The Ridgid gauge is exactly the same as the one available from HF for $10! This gives you some indication as to why there is a large aftermarket for replacement devices.

            Aftermarket Miter Gauges, as I mentioned in my post above, overcome these two areas of imprecision and add more functionality.
            You can mount good auxiliary fences to them, or fit them to phenolic covered ply and make a decent sliding/cross cut/miter table. It wouldn't be worth it with the stock gauge due to the inherent issues already mentioned.


            David

            Comment


            • #7
              While looking at the Incra 1000SE. I came across the Incra 5000 which is the miter sled. Since I have no way to do 15" - 20" crosscuts (Except for a Skilsaw and straight edge) I was wondering if this would be a good deal. By the way how do you guys do large crosscuts of say a 5'x 18" piece of plywood without using a Radial Arm Saw.
              Thank you for all you input
              Tim

              Comment


              • #8
                I recently bought the Osborne EB3, and I like it a lot. I just cut an equilateral triangle, a petagon, a hexagon, a heptagon, and octagon, and a dodecagon all on the first try, all perfect! Can't say enopugh nice about this miter gauge.

                Sincerely,

                Mike Narges

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tim,

                  Depending on how big you can build one (which is the popular way to acquiring one, a cross-cut sled would be able to cut a 5ft. x 18" piece on a contractor saw. I don't read across many who buy one and there are some good sites that offer assistance in building them (and they'll come to mind in a second). You may want to do a search on this forum for further discussion.

                  Here is a picture of the one I just built with my assistant posing with it and I cut 6 and 12" pieces that were 6 ft. long with no problems and plenty safe. [img]smile.gif[/img]

                  Patrick<br />patrickssmith@cox.net<br />members.cox.net/patrickssmith

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry, I'm still trying to get the hang of this picture thing (as well as WWin' in general):

                    Patrick<br />patrickssmith@cox.net<br />members.cox.net/patrickssmith

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for the info Mr. Johnson. I just did a quick check of local stores listed on the internet and several our intenet sites and your place has a great deal. I been looking at this for a coupla months, thans again.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Patrick, great cross cut sled, and also the thingy assistant holding it down to prevent cupping...must do something to get better slow dried wood! I'm slightly concerned about dampness of the sled and the possible effect that that my have on it's stability, but you know best. [img]tongue.gif[/img]

                        My "sliding table" above gives the same advantages as a cross cut sled, with the added benefit of angles. The fence is 36' long and well able to support quite large panels. The fixed table to the right of the blade can be whatever you want, in this case, around 23" long.

                        Just slap your miter gauge on the top, and the miter bar below, and you're in business!

                        David

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thank you all for your input. It helped me tremendously in my decision. I decided on the Incra 5000 sled. I shopped around and couldn't come up with a better price than Woodpecker has. Thank you Big Johnson for the insight on the coupon it saved me $20.

                          Tim

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Too late perhaps, but did you look at the acu-miter? I saw both at a wood show last year and just felt the Incra seemed to fragile, while the accu-miter was heavier and more solid. I use mine as much for cross-cutting as I do miters and so I wanted something a little stockier.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X