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Any comparison between Freud blade LU83R010 and TKR906

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  • Any comparison between Freud blade LU83R010 and TKR906

    Just wondering if anyone has used the Freud blades LU83R010 and TKR906 and can comment on their performance.

    I compared the specs of the two together and the TKR906 has a slightly bigger kerf .098 while the LU83R has .091.

    Rip, crosscut and plywood are rated as good while the TKR906 is rated as excellent for crosscuts and rips and good for plywood.

    Both have 50 teeth and the LU83R is rated as industrial.

    A store is selling the TKR for $40CDN so considering picking one up based on the price.

  • #2
    I'm sure both will work fine, but the Industrial series indicated with an "L" prefix is considered a step up from the Avanti/TK and Diablo series found at the big home centers. If the price difference is minor, I'll always lean toward the upgrade...even if small.

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    • #3
      Not sure about the TKR but I've tried the TK906 which I believe is exactly the same without the coating. I would strongly recommend the LU83R010. The TK series is the cheaper series and lacks some of the refinement of the LU series. Most notably they have no anti-vibration cuts and they are really LOUD when cutting. They also tend to wobble a bit more as a result. I've had some pretty bad deflection problems ripping very thick stuff on the TK906. It also has a higher hook angle at 15 degree while the LU83 is 10 deg which will give a slightly smoother cut and less tear out. The difference in cut quality between the two was immediately noticeable enough for me to not consider using the TK906 again. The LU83 cuts cleaner, burns less, is super quiet, and I can feel it seems to stress the saws motor less.

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      • #4
        Take a good look here and you may find the info you need.

        http://www.freudtools.com/woodworker..._Series_1.html

        Some of what matters when selecting a circular saw blade is what machine it will be used on. Industrial thick blades will give great cuts, but also require powerful motors and a good arbor. While such work well on good cabinet style table saw with a powerful motor and heavy built arbor like in a Delta Unisaw or USA made Powermatic 66, they will overload a contractor table saw. That's where a good quality thin kerf blade can really help. As for buying the lower cost blades, you'll never get the performance or life that you can from a top of the line blade. Can you tell us some info about which saw and how much motor you have? Also, what are you cutting. What you'll find is that there really is no "One Blade Does It All" and more than likely you'll need several different blades for different cutting jobs. It takes some good money, but it is a good investment.

        You may want to give this a try too. It's their "blade selector" where you make a few selections and then they come back with recomended blades.
        http://www.freudtools.com/tool_searc...ion1&section=a
        Last edited by Woussko; 12-26-2006, 11:48 PM.

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        • #5
          The LU83R is the thin kerf version of the LU84R so it will run fine on a contractor saw.

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          • #6
            I would most likely be cutting 1/2" or 3/4" veneer plywood. The table saw I was considering was the TS3650, but when I went into home depot I saw that sucker was huge I went and drove back home. The only place I could perhaps keep it would be in the garage. If I don't go for that one, then it would be perhaps a cheapo direct drive 13A or 15A model. Until I move out of my folks place, perhaps a cheapo direct drive would serve my purpose.

            From what I have read, the LU83R010 is best suited for plywood and something with 60T+ best suited for fine cuts on hardwood.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dieselgg View Post
              I would most likely be cutting 1/2" or 3/4" veneer plywood. The table saw I was considering was the TS3650, but when I went into home depot I saw that sucker was huge I went and drove back home. The only place I could perhaps keep it would be in the garage. If I don't go for that one, then it would be perhaps a cheapo direct drive 13A or 15A model. Until I move out of my folks place, perhaps a cheapo direct drive would serve my purpose.

              From what I have read, the LU83R010 is best suited for plywood and something with 60T+ best suited for fine cuts on hardwood.
              Something of comparable quality to the LU83 with 60T should do a better job in ply than the LU83...for example, the LU88...the LU74 (80T) would give a cleaner cut yet, and the LU79 (80T Hi-ATB) even cleaner, but the feedrate would slow some and wouldn't be as versatile as the LU83 or LU88. I personally think the LU88 is an amazing blade for the money...it's far more versatile than most 60T crosscut blades and cuts cleaner the most 40 or 50T combo blades (including my WWII, Tenryu Gold Medal, Ridge Carbide TS2000, LU84, Leitz, Infinity, and DW7657)...it just seems to have the "sweet spot" for my needs in my saw. http://www.epinions.com/content_226312687236

              Skip the cheapo direct drive route...there are many good quality portable jobsite saws that are well built and very functional...TS2400, Bosch 4000, DW745, PC3812, Sears 21289... They may not be quite the caliber of a well made cast iron full size saw like the 3650, but the $150 cheapo's are a waste of time, money, and effort IMHO.
              Last edited by hewood; 12-28-2006, 08:48 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dieselgg View Post
                Until I move out of my folks place, perhaps a cheapo direct drive would serve my purpose.
                The problem with the cheapo direct drive saw is that, in addition to being less capable of accurate cuts, they tend to have substandard fences and tolerances that are well outside safe ranges. The runout on one of those blades, coupled with the tendancy of the fence to rack under load, can and will lead to problems with kickback.

                Had I spent the extra $400 when I first started, I could have avoided the roughly $4,000 bill from the doctors office when kickback jerked my left hand into a spinning blade. I could have avoided the weeks of pain, and the lifetime of disfigurement of having my left index finger trimmed down about 1/4" shorter than my right. I could have avoided the damage it has done to my ability to play guitar (it's awfully hard to use that finger on the fretboard these days). Still, I got lucky. It could have (and probably should have) been a lot worse.

                If you can't afford to buy a good tablesaw with a solid fence and close tolerances, then find a friend who will let you use his workshop until you can afford one. If you just can't wait and you feel like you absolutely have to buy el cheapo, then do yourself a favor and throw the fence away. A straight piece of MDF solidly clamped down to the table is better than a cheap extruded aluminum fence that will rack on the outfeed side and throw your workpiece back at you, or drag your hand into the blade.

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                • #9
                  Sorry to hear about about your accident. You were very lucky and as you said it could have been a lot worse. With lots and lots of practice, I'm sure you will have full playin ability with the guitar.

                  Thanks for the safety tip. The other day, I went to Home Depot to buy the TS3650 but the awe size just stopped me in my feet. Its take up 5ft x 3ft in real estate not including about the 8 inches for the motor sticking out in the back. No room in the garage, we keep the cars in there. No space in any of the rooms in the basement. It is higly recommended but a lot of people fail to mention that it is not a practical saw to have at home unless you intend to have a room that will be used as dedicated workshop for it.

                  For now I am using a jigsaw against a straight edge to cut my pieces. I was thinking about a portable table saw like the Bosch 4000 or the Ridgid TS2400LS but they are too expensive. The Bosch 4000 gets excellent reviews but I can't understand for the big price tage why the gears used to raise the blade is made out of plastic. I hear it wears pretty quickly.

                  So perhaps I will look for another quality portable saw like the Dewalt at a good price and build an out feedtable for it or take your advice wait until I move in my own place.

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                  • #10
                    TS2400LS on sale

                    Home Depot has an online special for factory reconditioned TS2400LS saws. They have them priced at $314.10. That's not a bad price for a good saw, if you don't mind buying factory reconditioned tools.

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                    • #11
                      Too my fellow Canadian:

                      I run my shop out of my garage too and with if being so cold I too keep my cars in the garage. I have to park them outside to do anything but it is worth it. I recently bought the table saw and you are right it is big but worth it. Make the one purchase and be over with it. I also bought the planer, jointer and 12" compound slide saw and the portable stand, all in my garage. It is a big garage but like I said I still have to move the vehicles out.
                      Go big or stay home!!!

                      Does anyone have any info on the Rigid saw blades??

                      Please send me any info!!

                      Thanks
                      Kevin

                      "SABOT ON!"

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kevin smith View Post
                        ...Does anyone have any info on the Rigid saw blades??
                        I'm not sure who makes the stock Ridgid saw blade that comes with the saw, but it's pretty typical of stock blades...not so hot. The aftermarket line of Ridgid blades are pretty good. They're made by Freud to about the same standards as their Diablo and Avanti/TK line. The regular retail price on the Ridgid line puts them within sale price range of an upgrade to the Freud Industrial series (prefix "L") which should offer an advantage in performance and longevity.

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                        • #13
                          Ridgid saw blades

                          I got the aftermarket titanium-coated combo blade. It's nice. Cuts smooth, quiet, and doesn't burn. I've put a LOT through it in the last 4 months, and it just keeps whispering along through everything I throw at it.

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