Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Safety Reminder Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Safety Reminder

    A buddy of mine had an "incident" in his shop last weekend and it served to remind me of how easy it is to overlook the seamingly small but potentially most important tool we should all have in our shops. I thought it was worth passing on as a reminder and reinforcement of something everyone already knows but worthy of repeating. My friend had a small fire which was contained to a scrap box in his shop which is located in his basement like mine. Long story short, he got the fire out and was lucky to get by with just a lot of smoke and a little bruised pride. After hearing about this, my first thought was to check my fire extinguisher gauges and make sure they were all where they should be and fully loaded. I keep one in my shop, the kitchen, the garage and in my offroad 4X4. They are all ABC type and usable for any type fire around the house. It's such a small price to pay for such a potentially important tool. I'm sure everyone will agree with this but sometimes a reminder is good.

    Later,
    Wood Dog

  • #2
    Thanks for the Reminder [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Semper Fi <BR>Chuck<BR>USMC 66-70

    Comment


    • #3
      Next time you are upgrading your fire extinguishers, consider this: most of the extinguishers sold for home use are so-called "dry chemical" extinguishers. They do a reasonable job of interrupting the combustion reaction, but the chemical they use is very hard to clean up, and it will ruin anything electronic and most stuff that is metal. Kidde now has a line of foam extinguishers that are a bit more expensive, but will do at least as good a job as an extinguisher, and are much easier to clean up.

      Something else to remember: most of these extinguishers work by chemical reaction. Unlike water, they do not reduce the temperature of the fire load below the kindling point. That means that once the fire is "out," you should spread the materials that were burning apart (known as "overhauling") and keep an eye on them until they cool, lest you get a rekindle.

      Comment


      • #4
        Funny you mention this. I was just showing somebody my shop (if you could call it that) and he said the only thing I was missing was a fire extinguisher. I agreed.

        I still can't think of anything that could cause a fire, though. What started your friend's fire?

        Comment


        • #5
          Two common things that can start a woodshop fire are a hot bit of metal smoldering in sawdust (like an accidental nail in a board might cause) and improper storage and disposal of oil-soaked finishing rags.

          Dave

          Comment


          • #6
            I recently read on a different forum about a guy who was using a bench grinder when a hot spark flew from the grinder and ignited his sweatshirt. He only realized it when he smelled the smoke, and was able to put it out without much trouble, I think, but it could've been tragic.
            \". . . and only the stump, or fishy part of him remained.\"

            Comment


            • #7
              In my buddy's case, he was apparently a little careless when he dumped his ashtray into the waste bin. Looking back on it, he guessed that everything was not completely extinguished. (I originally thought he said the fire was in his scrape bin but I misunderstood.) My experiance in working with him on projects is that he is generally very safe and focused but it only takes that one lapse in concentration for stuff to really go bad fast. I spoke with him last night and he is really wrestling with how bad this could have been. I was at a loss as to what to say other than reminding him that we are all human and we all screw up occasionally. All we can do is learn the lesson and move on and be thankful that it wasn't worse. I tried to lighten the moad by tellihg him that some obscure patron saint of wood workers must have been looking out for him. Who knows, maybe there is a St. Woody out there somewhere.

              Later,
              Wood Dog

              Comment


              • #8
                Saint Joseph is the Patron Saint of artisans and craftsmen.

                Dave

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dave,

                  If I ever make onto Who Wants to be a Millionaire would you be my phone-a-friend lifeline?

                  In Awe Dog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    One more thing to remember about the dry chemical extinguishers is that the chemical tends to harden in the bottom of the canister.

                    In commercial use they must be recharged every 12 months. This usually involves the removal and replacement of the powder. Not that the old is disposed of, just removed and moved around enough to return it to its state of being a powder. The guage shows more about the quantity of propellent than powder left.

                    Around here they charge between $6-10 per bottle with a commercial tag. Probably less without the tag.

                    That reminds me....it is time for me to get mine done.

                    Dan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Fire Extinguishers, wheres yours? If like me your shop is unheated except when your out there your extinguisher needs to be recharged yearly, I believe that this is actually an NFPA requirement. You can help yourself out a little by giving your extinguisher a mid year thump. The powder can pack during the cold winter months and that's when your extinguisher could fail if needed. So mid winter, turn your extinguisher upside down and cradle it in your arm, give the bottom and the sides a couple of thumps with a rubber mallet, this will unpack the powder if it is packed. When you have your extinguisher checked make sure you use a reputable firm, some points to consider, Your powder is reusable it does not have to be replaced, hydro testing is only required every 6 years, and plastic extinguishers generally cannot be properly checked, or recharged so just thump them every few months and buy a new one every few years. For more info check out NFPA's web site, I believe it's www.NFPA.org.
                      Dave
                      It\'s not the quantity or quality of your tools that matters....<br />It\'s all in the firewood that\'s left over.....

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X