Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
jointer vs plainer Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • jointer vs plainer

    have a very small shop, with all the saws and drills you will need but I am missing a plainer and jointer. I feel with small cabinet work etc i would be better off buying a 6 in jointer. But I'm not sure if I should purchase a planer instead. I just don't know if I will be working with enough raw wood to make it the first choice.

    Any input would be helpful.

    MN

  • #2
    Even if you aren't planning on working with rough lumber a jointer is still a good investment, any time you have a piece of lumber that starts to warp or twist on you, or if you plan on glueing up multiple boards together you will want to use a jointer to true up the edges. You can do the same thing with a router and a templete, a router table also a good long straight edge and a table saw. The only problem with buying a jointer is that after you use it to make a side flat you need a planer to make them parallel. I say get a jointer you never know when you need it and then later on get a planer. I am upgrading my 6" Delta table top to a 8" Grizzly because of width and bed length. If you go with a 6" make sure you get one with a long bed that was my biggest mistake when I got mine it had a short bed. Good luck

    Comment


    • #3
      do you think the ridgid model would be a good one to start with? Is it better than the delta that you started with?

      Comment


      • #4
        I would get both if possible, but if I had to choose between a thickness planer and a jointer, I'd get the thickness planer. You can always use a router to true-up the edges of a board after you run it through the planer. If you use a good glue-up blade in your table saw you can get good results too.

        just my 2 cents...

        Comment


        • #5
          I hate to argue with a man with a gun, but...

          I did the very same thing. I got a decent thickness planer and used it to smooth up rough lumber. Unfortunately, I ended up with very smooth curved lumber. A thickness planer will not bring a warped board to true, unless you build a sled and use shims. Frankly, it is so time consuming that it's just not worth it for me. Ditto using the router to joint the board edges. I never could get it to work right.

          A 6" or 8" jointer, on the other hand, can both flatten boards and joint the edges. Still, you won't be able to get even thickness and parallel faces with a jointer.

          I now have both a thickness planer and a 6" jointer. I can't imagine doing without either. The Ryobi 12" planer ran about $200 at Cummins, and the Ridgid 6" jointer was around $350 at Home Depot. Best money I ever spent. I take my rough lumber (nominally 4/4x7x36), and trim the edges on the table saw, bringing the width down to around 5-3/4". Then I pick the cupped face and run it through the jointer to flatten it out. Then I joint the edges square to the face. Then I have a flat face to put on the planer bed as I run the board through the thickness planer to get my final thickness and parallel faces.

          Alternatively, if I'm shooting for thin stock, I'll joint one face and both edges, then resaw on the table saw to get thin stock blanks. I'll joint flat faces on my resawn stock, then plane them to final thickness. It's enough to make you appreciate why finished dimensional hardwood is so expensive.

          Comment


          • #6
            I just recently bought both the planer and jointer from Home Depot and of course they are both Rigid. I think they are great. The only thing that I would like to see an improvement on is the blades for the planer. I would to see them in carbon steel, which would last longer. I can't imagine only having one and not the other. The jointer is very quite when on and works very well. The planer is great too, a pretty good dust collection when you hook up our shop vac to it.

            Good luck in deciding!!
            Kevin

            "SABOT ON!"

            Comment


            • #7
              A jointer and planer work great in tandem. They do similar, but distinctly different functions. A jointer will make two sides of a board flat, but not necessarily parallel to each other... a planer will make two sides parallel to each other, but not necessarily flat. A jointer flattens irregularities out of the face then adds a straght perpendicular edge. The planer will smooth and reduce thickness but will mimmick any irregularities in the bottom face.

              That said, if I could only get one, I'd go with the planer because with the help of a planing sled as a flat reference and some shimming, you can coax a planer into flattening a face...but it's very difficult to get a jointer to make two sides parallel and to consistent thickness. There are other methods to get a 90 degree adjacent edge....TS, router, handplane, etc.

              There are several strong contenders in the $300-$400 range. Some form of cutterhead lock is one of the more important features IMO...so is a dust chute b/c planers are chipping spitting monsters. I'd look for a deal on a Ridgid 1300, Makita 2012, Delta 22-580 or TS400, or a Dewalt 734 or 735.....

              Comment


              • #8
                That said, if I could only get one, I'd go with the planer because with the help of a planing sled as a flat reference and some shimming, you can coax a planer into flattening a face...but it's very difficult to get a jointer to make two sides parallel and to consistent thickness. There are other methods to get a 90 degree adjacent edge....TS, router, handplane, etc.
                That's more or less what I'm saying...
                I'd use shims and hot glue with a sled to true the board...

                Comment

                Working...
                X