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  • TS3650 which is better thick or thin kerf blade

    I don't know if this topic has been discussed before but for the TS3650 owners .... is it better to go with a thin or thick kerf blade. From what I have read I think, you will get good results from both and results will vary between blade manufacturers.

    I am a novice so I just want to learn from the experience gained from others and not take a chance in buying blades, to only discard them later. Most of my cuts will be veneer plywood ... for now.

  • #2
    Top manufactures like Forrest and Freud suggest a TK with a motor the size of yours.

    I've used lots of both full and TK blades, and both cut well if all else is equal. The TK will have a faster feedrate and noticeably less drag on the motor, so you're less likely to experience burning and premature motor burnout... it's a simple matter of physics. Theoretically, a TK will have more tendency for deflection than a full kerf, but high quality blades like Forrest, Freud's industrial, Infinity, Leitz, Dewalt's upper lines, Tenryu, and Ridge Carbide have very stiff bodies made from excellent alloys... I've never experienced deflection on the 20+ highend 10" TK's I've tried, even without a stiffener....for 12" I'd stick with a full kerf because of the larger span.

    It's mainly a matter of preference, but given the manufacturers recommendations, the feedrate and motor benefits, and excellent results, I've switched to using TK's nearly exclusively, and will continue using them unless I find reason not to.

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    • #3
      in my limited experience with a tk freud lu88 vs an fk dewalt 7657 i prefer the full kerf. i was getting blade deflection with the tk, especially on 45 degree cuts. maybe it was just me or my saw setup but since i've switched to the fk my corners meet up much nicer.

      rb

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      • #4
        Put a Forrest thin kerf on it and don't look back.

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        • #5
          I am in the full kerf camp. If you keep your blade clean and sharp, you can cut anything with a full kerf that you can with a TK. Most TK users also use a blade stablizer which then cuts your cutting depth down. Also, not all blade types (rip, crosscut, melamine, planer, etc) come in TK so your saw rule is not always accurate, all types of blades come in full kerf and they all are within a gnat's butt of the same thickness so your rule is always on.

          Keep your blade clean and sharp for safer and better cuts.

          gator

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gator View Post
            If you keep your blade clean and sharp, you can cut anything with a full kerf that you can with a TK
            Possibly, but the TK will do it faster with less bogging. Anytime the motor begins to slow, the TK will bog less than the full kerf b/c it's taking ~ 30% less material off.

            Originally posted by gator View Post
            Most TK users also use a blade stablizer which then cuts your cutting depth down
            Stabilizers do cut down on max depth, but the claim about "most TK users" using them isn't a fact that I've ever read. They're optional AFAIK, and I know of very few who do use them. The rep from Freud says they're not needed with their thin blades.
            I hear alot about people not noticing a difference though. I'd bet if you took a poll, most that have tried them find no difference so tend not to use them, but I honestly don't know what the percentage of stabilizer users or what the stats are.

            Originally posted by gator View Post
            Also, not all blade types (rip, crosscut, melamine, planer, etc) come in TK so your saw rule is not always accurate, all types of blades come in full kerf and they all are within a gnat's butt of the same thickness so your rule is always on.
            Not all models come in TK, but you should have no trouble finding a dozens of rip, crosscut, melamine, or combo blade in TK or full. Not all suppliers go with standard 0.125" full kerf or a 0.98" thin. Tenryu is one example that tends to split the difference on their regular kerf with 0.111", and offers an ultra TK of 0.79". There are lots of exceptions within the hundreds of blades to choose from.

            Originally posted by gator View Post
            Keep your blade clean and sharp for safer and better cuts.
            I absolutely agree with that! But it's really hard to advise going against the recommendations from the top names in the industry. I use thin kerf based on the manufacture's suggestion.
            Last edited by TomP; 01-01-2007, 07:51 PM.

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            • #7
              With my underpowered saw I have better results with the TK blade. But to be fair. I use my saw nearly 100% on hardwoods.
              The FK blades only bog down on me on hardwoods over 2" thick when ripping, with a TK blade this has yet to be a problem.
              I think what it comes down to is what is the best blade for what you are doing. I dont care if my rips are not perfect since I will clean them up with a plane anyway, but I want my crosscuts right since I hate planing endgrain.
              www.TheWoodCellar.com

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              • #8
                My Forrest thin kerf is just great on the 3650.
                2ยข
                Stay well and play well.
                Skip

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                • #9
                  Hello All,
                  This is my first post here and I just dealt with the Full/Thin Kerf issue.

                  When it came to name brand, I went with Forrest Saw Blades. Why, becauseI just can't find a negative review on them.
                  I read a lot of posts here, and elsewhere, about the pro/cons of TK blades.
                  I was still confused which to use with the Ridgid 3650. So I called Forrest, 1-800-733-7111, and talk to a very knowledgeable guy named Tony, he's at ext. 313. Tony said he's worked for Forrest since the beginning and even designed some of the blades. This guy will throw facts and blades measurements at you faster than you can say your ABC's! This is a good thing because he really knows what he's talking about and loves to talk!!!
                  I told him the 3650 has a 1 1/2 HP motor and that I'll be cutting 100% hard wood. He recommended the Wood Worker II (2) thin kerf for the ease of cut. He has not experienced blade defection/wobble with these TK blades.

                  I thought Amazon had the best price on them until he told me about SliversMill.com . Slivers also runs a website called, www.forrestsawbladesonline.com . Last week I ordered a WWII TK for $80.25 plus S+H, $10. I ordered it on Thursday and received it on Saturday! And that's from NY to Seattle, WA!!!

                  I can't give you my personal experience with this blade because I have no saw at the moment. I'll be picking up a Ridgid 3650 later this month.
                  Umm, buying the blade before the saw?
                  Is that like putting the cart before the Horse??? LOL!!!

                  I'll post back here once I get the saw and install the WWII blade.

                  Roy Fek

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                  • #10
                    A good TK like the Forrest should be a great choice.

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