Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Blank Canvas for Garage Workshop Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Blank Canvas for Garage Workshop

    Well I did it. Yesterday - on a whim - I ripped out my L shaped workbench, took out the hanging cabinet as well as the peg board tool organizer in the garage. I insulated, put up sheetrock and plan to start over.

    I have a bunch of ideas for garage shops from Workbench, Shopnotes and Wood Magazines and my head is swimming.

    Here's what I need to know:
    1) Standard Bench Height
    2) Standard Depth of a Workbench
    3) Best Affordable Material for Benchtop (i.e. MDF, exterior grade pylwood, better grade plywood, etc.)

    Thanks much in advance. I know there are some great ideas out there.
    Stay well and play well.
    Skip

  • #2
    skipsax, I built all my benches and tables the same height as my TS. This allows me to use any piece of 'counter' top for supporting my sheet goods or long stock. I'm not overly tall but found this to be a comfortable height. My work bench that is attached to the wall is just 2x4's with 3/4" melamine top and my work bench is 3 layers of 3/4" birch plywood on a 2x6 frame with 4x4 legs. Certainly nothing fancy but very practicle. I bought 2 base cabinets from Lowes and put tops on them and built a shelf to hold my compound miter in between the cabinets. Hope this little bit helps..
    If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

    Comment


    • #3
      Shop Cabinets

      Like many of you, my garage is my shop. The garage is "lined" with shelves that I use to store tools and everything else. I'm also into astronomy - one project of mine is building a telescope - and through that hobby I came across a guy in Florida named Tom Clark. Tom has built some pretty impressive telescopes, but he also has an interesting idea about shop storage.

      Most workbenches are nice to work on, but the area below is often wasted space, or at best space not efficiently utilized. When you have a small shop (like your garage!), space is a precious commodity. After I saw Tom's cabinets, I bought his book and made one. The cabinet is a very simple design, made from plywood with standard square box drawers, etc. But it's solid as a rock, and looks pretty good with a stain finish. I used hardwood plywood, I would NOT use MDF. Some pics of the one I made is here (Click Me). I plan to build a couple more of these cabinets, and kill two birds with one stone: make more efficient use of my limited storage space, and also get a nice workbench area. Shelves are such an eyesore, and they get very dusty in a woodworking shop. These cabinets eliminate that. Plus you don't have to get on the ground like a snake to get stuff off the bottom shelf - just open the bottom drawer and get what you want. Very nice.

      As far as project/workbench plans go, IMHO getting Tom's book has been the best 10 bucks I've ever spent. His website is here (Click Me).

      - djb
      sigpic

      A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

      Restore the Republic.

      Comment


      • #4
        For me the issue of top material is ability to sand it. I get glue, paint, varnish, nail holes, water, gouges, just about anything that can mess it up gets on it. I just sand it down and keep going.

        I've used a couple mtls. a rolling 4' X 4' bench with osb top. Height is ts height to use as outfeed table as needed. fixed 24' long bench with particle board top that is higher because I am tall (6'5") and I wanted a more comfortable working height.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Blank Canvas for Garage Workshop

          Well I'm well on my way to having a cleaner, more efficient work area. Although I plan to build more cabinets and/or tables, the main work area is finished. Here's a link to the other post with some pics.
          Thanks for the advice and ideas.
          Skip

          http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...t=10323&page=2
          Stay well and play well.
          Skip

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Blank Canvas for Garage Workshop

            I build my bench tops from three laminates of 3/4" plywood, and then add on a sheet of tempered Masonite as a renewable work surface. I just tack it down with brads driven in below the surface, and have never had a problem. Smooth, dent resistant, sands easily, etc.
            Steve
            www.MorrisGarage.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Blank Canvas for Garage Workshop

              I just re topped my bench. It's a 2x6 frame 4x4 legs 1 1/2 thick top 72" long x 34" wide a little lower than my saw. I added a 3/4" mdf and sacraficial 1/4" tempered hard board on top of that. I waxed the heck out of it and buffed it smooth as a baby's behind.
              I also re built my RAS/chop saw table. Together they're a little over 12' long with the much need support on the right of the RAS blade now. I do wish I would have insulated however, lately it's only been getting to the teens and man it aint no fun when your fingers and toes are numb!

              DAN

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Blank Canvas for Garage Workshop

                sounds like a nice bench. post pics if you can.
                Skip
                Stay well and play well.
                Skip

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Shop Cabinets

                  Originally posted by djb View Post

                  As far as project/workbench plans go, IMHO getting Tom's book has been the best 10 bucks I've ever spent. His website is here (Click Me).

                  - djb
                  DJB,
                  I contacted Tom and did try to order his book. I use PayPal for most of my online purchases and he didn't take that. Maybe I'll get it later. Book looks good!
                  Skip
                  Stay well and play well.
                  Skip

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Blank Canvas for Garage Workshop

                    As for height, it depends on what the main use of the bench is for. You want the surface you are working on to where it is comfortable. One "rule of thumb" for a woodworking bench on which you will be using a lot of hand tools (Planes, chisels, dovetail work, etc) is for the bench to be the same height as your knuckles are with your arms hanging down by your side. (For many people that will be somewhere from 31 to 35") That said, most people feel comfortable with it an inch or two above that. If you are planning to use it to set power tools on top (i.e. Grinder, miter saw, bench joiner/planer, drill press, etc), you will probably want it about 3 to 4" lower so that the machine work surface is closer to a comfortable level.
                    If you have a table saw, use the table for a couple of the things you want to use the bench for, and adjust the height of your new bench as needed for comfort.

                    Remember, after it is built it will be easier to raise it than lower it.

                    JMTCW

                    Go
                    Practicing at practical wood working

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X