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My TS3612 wishlist

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  • #16
    Back to the open web extensions...and pencils falling through. I attached a thin piece of plywood to the bottom, and use the space as a hiding place for pencils, etc. when I am using the saw. Making an virtue out of what some consider a vice.

    To attach the plywood, I jammed a piece of soft wood into the open space at each end, and tacked the plywood to the small filler pieces. Not perfect, but pretty stable.

    I also have a push "stick" made out of 1/4 inch plywood that lives in the top of the web, so there is no excuse for not using a push stick when needed - it is always close at hand.

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    • #17
      The extensions due have some very nice advantages too.
      </font>
      • They're much easier to install and adjust. </font>
      • They're not stamped steel. </font>
      The router extension makes me nervous. Wouldn't all that extra weight and vibration mean more maintainence?
      To put another set of holes on the outside of the wings I clamped the two wings together edge to edge and used the holes in one as a template for the other. Use plenty of oil and you'll be done in no time.

      Also the t-slots on the top of the fence make great pencil holders too. Just let them hang over the edge a little so you can get them out.

      My biggest gripe is that the Herc-u-lift hardly gets the thing off the ground.

      [ 12-23-2002, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: J Reed ]

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      • #18
        Has anybody had a problem fitting miter slot accessories to the Ridgid saws? I found that 3/4" miter slots do not quite fit into the slots on my TS2424 because the are cut at 18mm. If I were to make a wishlist I would ask that they machine the miter slots to a standard 3/4" size. If anybody has any suggestions that would help please post them.

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        • #19
          All my old jigs worked but I recently purchased a tenoning jig and it was way too tight.


          At the end of the table it would barely move!


          What I found was that my older tools had already worn a bit and fit well. I stripped the paint off of the tenoning jig and it works fine now.


          If you're right about the 18mm that would suck seeing how 0.708661 does not equal 0.7500000.

          Could just be that new math I keep hearing about.

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          • #20
            Ridgid slots are .75" +- whatever tolerance they use. Thing is, other companies use bars that are .75" +- yada yada...

            Dave

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            • #21
              I noticed yesterday the Biesemeyer sells a set of extension rails and fence for Ridgid tables. (24 left and 52 right. WOW!) Anyway, under the instruction area, they show roughly how to make an extension table to fit the saw that will accomodate fence extensions.

              Also on the Biesemeyer website, I found rough dimensions and prints for an outfeed table. (no table mounting instructions) Anyway, at least the dimensions are there to get someone like me started on the table.

              Also, they do sell the table legs as a set to add to any table with a frame. I'm sure some have seen this, but for me it was some help.

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              • #22
                24 left and 52 right

                Biesemeyer Commercial fences are available with up to 122" right side capacity. Never know when you might need to make a twelve foot rip, right?

                Dave

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                • #23
                  D.A. -

                  I may be wrong, and Jake can correct me if I am, but I think that Ridgid's miter slot tolerance is .75+.000/-.005 while typical jigs are made with bars that are ±.0025. That would mean that bars on the plus side will not fit the miter slots. These diminsions were true when Ridgid built Craftsman and I think are still true.

                  gator

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                  • #24
                    I have it on reasonably good authority that shall I say "non-Ridgid" saws have .750" + tolerance bars. If a Ridgid slot was on the large side of tolerance, and say a Delta tenoning jig's bar on the low side, they would nest.

                    Dave

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                    • #25
                      J Reed - I had trouble with the Herc-u-lift on my 3612, too, until I loosened the bolts that connect the bars of the lift to the four corners of the saw. With those bolts loose, you can lift the saw higher and the lift works much better in general. I believe I have somewhere between 1/4 to 1/2" of "play" in those bolts now and it works well for me.

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                      • #26
                        I must apologize. I made a mistake the number I meant to say was 19 mm instead of 18. I got this info stating that the miter slot is 19mm from here.

                        http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com...3&1=364&3=2549

                        This could be wrong but I have had the experience that certain jigs with 3/4" bars won't fit my miter slot and they all seem to fit a friends delta.

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                        • #27
                          Drew, that link says the -bar- is 19mm. That makes sense, for a 3/4" slot. Nineteen millimeters is .748-and-a-hair inch, gives a thousandth on each side clearance.

                          You cannot put a .750" bar into a .750" slot, just have to have a bit of clearance.

                          Dave

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                          • #28
                            I too would like to see some of these extras. But I did it my own way. I have the TS2424 and this is what I did.
                            I built a extension table, real cheep. scrap 3/4 playwood frame, 1/4" playwood top, and 1 1/2" square legs. I removed the right side wing after constructing this extension table and laid them face down on my home made malamine assembly table.
                            Marked the existing wholes to the home made top. Drilled the wholes on my DP1550, then fliped the cast iron wing over and marked the wholes on it. Then took it to the DP1550 and drilled the wholes.
                            Spent less than 2 bucks for hardware to put it all together. I then measured and marked and drilled wholes for the fence rails. I moved the rails as far right as I could giving me 52" capabilites to the right of the blade. Nothing on the left, but I never put the fence on the left side of the blade since I owned the saw.
                            I built a 6'x3' outfeed table with folding legs. Used 1x4 pine for the frame and 1/4" plywood for the top. 1 1/2" square legs and scrap Oak door stop molding for the folding leg braces. Put some heighth adjusters on the bottom of the legs. It's also handy extra table for verious things. When not in use, it takes up 5" against the wall behind my plywood stack. My shop is a pole building so the playwood rests against the poles, and the table stands between the poles and slides in and out at one end so I don't have to move the plywood stack to get to it.
                            Just last weekend, after assembling my new JessEm Router Table system, I took the Powermatic router table that was made to go on a table saw, and put it there, on the left side of the saw. Did the same thing on drilling the wholes for mounting, and used the same 1 1/2" square legs cut from 2x4's. I used some cheep 2" L Steel from Home Depot to mount from the last rail hole in the table saw top, accross the wing and router table.
                            With all this attached to both sides of the table saw, and removing the heavy Rout-R-Lift plate and router from the top, the lift system works just fine and can wheel it out of the way with no problem.
                            What I would really like to see as a big improvement is the dust colletion for the saw. It gets a fair amount of the dust, but there is always some spewing out around the saw.
                            Some zero clearence inserts would be nice too.
                            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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