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Save money on wipe on Poly

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  • Save money on wipe on Poly

    Hey guys, Just a tip to save some money.
    I have noticed That wipe on Poly is pretty expensive. So, To make your own all you have to do is buy regular poly and mix it with Mineral Spirits. I prefer a 2:1 ratio. 2 parts Mineral to 1 part poly. You can make a larger quanity for the money doing it this way. This method can also be used with tung oil. Some people vary the ratios and gradual work thier way up. especially on non porous woods.

    Example 5:1, couple coats,then go to a 4:1 couple coats, then 3:1 etc.

    I find the 2:1 works well on walnut, leapoard wood, butternut, birdseye maple, and oak

    Hope this saves you some $$

  • #2
    Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

    Thanks Tnblues30, I think I'll give your suggestion a shot. I can't do much worse than I already have, and I'll probably do much better and save some bucks to boot .I did see in one of my other threads that a sanding sealer applied over the stained surface helps retain the pieces color and evenness. Any thoughts on that?

    Hector...

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    • #3
      Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

      Not sure on the sanding sealer Hector. One other note about mixing.Only mix what you need for the project esp. with tung oil. It will only be good for about 3 weeks or so. I mix up mine in mason jar so the air left in the jar causes the tung oil to turn clody over time due to the interaction with the air left in the jar. I would say the same goes for poly, Ive just always mixed up what I needed.

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      • #4
        Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

        Here's a question related to the dilution of finishes:

        Are mineral spirits food safe? One reason I like using tung oil is that is is food safe, but after diluting it with m.s., is it still okay to use on bowls, chopping boards, etc?

        Thanks.
        "Dad, E means empty, NOT broken" - my cousin Doug, to his dad after the tractor ran out of diesel and Ed claimed the gas gauge was broken.

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        • #5
          Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

          Originally posted by leer13 View Post
          Here's a question related to the dilution of finishes:

          Are mineral spirits food safe? One reason I like using tung oil is that is is food safe, but after diluting it with m.s., is it still okay to use on bowls, chopping boards, etc?

          Thanks.
          The MS part of the solution evaporates as it dries out. Still, I'm not sure poly in any form is the ideal finish for that type of project.

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          • #6
            Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

            Originally posted by Hector B View Post
            I did see in one of my other threads that a sanding sealer applied over the stained surface helps retain the pieces color and evenness. Any thoughts on that?

            Hector...
            While I usually don't work with stain I can tell you that is apparently common practice to di so and does indeed work.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

              Thanks Velo - and my bad. I was actually meaning that I use tung oil on my chopping boards and other kitchen/food items that I build. Also on our existing cutting boards and salad bowls. But I appreciate your help. I think that the MS will evaporate, I was just worried about any residue left behind and whether it would be harmful or poisonous.
              "Dad, E means empty, NOT broken" - my cousin Doug, to his dad after the tractor ran out of diesel and Ed claimed the gas gauge was broken.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

                Originally posted by leer13 View Post
                Here's a question related to the dilution of finishes:

                Are mineral spirits food safe? One reason I like using tung oil is that is is food safe, but after diluting it with m.s., is it still okay to use on bowls, chopping boards, etc?

                Thanks.
                Tung oil is not food safe. Mineral oil is. Personally I only use salad bowl oil which is made especially for salad bowls, cutting boards and anything around food.

                Be careful I repeat Tung is NOT food safe.
                Rev Ed

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

                  Hi RevEd.

                  I use the Lee Valley Tung Oil - as quoted from their website:

                  100% Pure Tung Oil

                  Also known as China wood oil, tung oil is a non-toxic, hard-drying oil that forms an elastic film resistant to abrasion and moisture. It penetrates well and builds a transparent but matte finish on wood, emphasizing the grain and color.

                  It is a good general-purpose finish and is approved for food-contact items.

                  This product contains no thinners or driers.

                  That is all I have to go on. I can't see them stating that Tung oil is foodsafe, when it is not. Any thoughts?
                  "Dad, E means empty, NOT broken" - my cousin Doug, to his dad after the tractor ran out of diesel and Ed claimed the gas gauge was broken.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

                    Hi Again - not to flog this subject too much, but I dod some more research. It seems that diluting pure tung oil for use on item that will be in contact with food is an accepted thing to do - as long as teh dilutant will evaporate fully.

                    From the Real Milk Paint Co website:

                    http://www.realmilkpaint.com/oil.html

                    a link to the FDA that says pure tung oil IS food safe:

                    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/script...cfm?FR=175.300

                    That sells it for me!

                    Cheers
                    "Dad, E means empty, NOT broken" - my cousin Doug, to his dad after the tractor ran out of diesel and Ed claimed the gas gauge was broken.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Tung oil and Pure tungoil "differences"

                      Most of the tung oil products on the retail market today are not pure tung oil. They have tung oil as a major component but have other additives, primarily varnish. Pure tung oil is available from refinishing supply houses, but don't expect the product you buy across the retail counter to be pure. And please don't be fooled by the phrase "contains pure tung oil." If this line is on the can, you can bet money it contains something else in addition to the "pure" tung oil.
                      -Source do it yourself.com

                      Thought this might be of interest. Typically I would use mineral oil or tung oil for butcher block or salad bowl, however, not sure about (varnish, and other Additivies). I would recommend looking for MSD sheet for the product you specifically buy for hazardous components. Additives probaby vary among manufactures.You could email manufacturer or the company website may have that information. If you are concerned about it.

                      Hope this helps anyone conerned about food safe finishes

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

                        Originally posted by leer13 View Post
                        Thanks Velo - and my bad. I was actually meaning that I use tung oil on my chopping boards and other kitchen/food items that I build. Also on our existing cutting boards and salad bowls. But I appreciate your help. I think that the MS will evaporate, I was just worried about any residue left behind and whether it would be harmful or poisonous.

                        I actually don't think the MS part is what you would have to be worried about as it dries out completely. HIts the poly/varnish particles themeselves I can't imagine as being too healthy for you at all. I would also wonder if any food that touches it could develop a slight varnishy taste

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

                          Poly is nasty for anything that has food contacting it. Unless you need poly to protect a surface there are nicer finishes out there.
                          I use pure tung oil or walnut oil for food items. You can even use the walnut oil from supermarkets if you are concerned about undisclosed additives, buy it at the market, make a salad sprinkled with walnut oil for an enemy, give it too him, if he doesn't dont die it is food safe.
                          www.TheWoodCellar.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

                            OK guys I may have screwed up. I mixed poly with thinner, I see everyone here is using Mineral Spirits. I have only put on one coat. Do I need to pitch what i've mixed and re-do with MS? Also, antone getting white spots after using the mixture? I had some white spots that alomost look like water stains. I made a shaker night stand and used quater sawen oak. After the poly/thinner mix dried I had smoe small white spots and different areas of the piece. They came off with very little pressure and #0000 steel wool.
                            Please check out my web page
                            www.woodandwax.net

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                            • #15
                              Re: Save money on wipe on Poly

                              Check what is in the "thinner". Some paint thinners are just turpentine and/or mineral spirits with a dash of toluene, MEK, and/or acetone. The MEK can cause your first coat to wrinkle up, so if it has that, you may be bettter off to save your mix for the first coat on the next project. If you can access the MSDS on-line, you should be able to tell what is in it. IF its jsut mineral spirits and or turpentine, you should be okay.

                              As for the milky spots, it sounds like "blushing". Blushing occurs when the solvent evaporates fast enough that the humidity from the air condenses and gets trapped in the paint. This happens most frequently when it is cold or very humid, and is worse if you are spraying it. If the coating is not cured, sometimes (rarely) you can get it out with some heat. Most times it is a remove and redo. If it came out with steel wool, count yourself lucky. If it is in fact blushing, then either your shop is too cold, or the solvent ("thinner) you are using is evaporating too fast. In that case, I would go to a fresh mix with mineral spirits as it evaporates slower.

                              Also make sure nothing is dripping moisture onto the piece. If you are spraying, make sure you have an oil/water separator on your air line.

                              HTHs
                              Go
                              Practicing at practical wood working

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