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  • Controlling dust on the TS and closing off the back

    Hi all,
    I am not actually new to this forum. My account stop working several months back and I never checked into it! Oh well.

    Anyway, I have a TS2424 and I have finally made a custom mobile base. The Herculift no longer works with the Biesemeyer 52" fence. The TS is on a custom base with a 4" dust port. However, the Ridgid TS have a multitude of air spaces which hamper dust collection. One notable space is on the back of the saw where the motor is! I would like to close this area off completely but that seems to be a big challenge if you want to retain the bevel cut capability! When you change the bevel angle to 45° the motor support brackets and blade guard attachment point also swings through an arc. I am trying to avoid having to enclose the whole motor assembly!

    Has anyone come up with an idea that effectively seals of the back of their TS?? I am open to suggestions!!

    Thanks,
    Steve

  • #2
    Re: Controlling dust on the TS and closing off the back

    There have been some solutions offered at www.BT3central.com for the Ryobi BT3000 saws. I made my back cover in two pieces (a top half and a bottom half) which attach to saw with velcro patches but most use magnetic strips. When I need to use the tilting feature I just remove the back and leave the vac hose attached to the blade shroud. Yea, I she a little dust because the 4" DC hose isn't finishing the job but it's not like it's a week long condition - just as long as the cuts need to be made and the back goes back in place in about 15 seconds.
    Best of luck,
    Chiz

    I forgot to mention that I have a 3650 but I believe the setup is similar.
    Last edited by ironhat; 01-17-2007, 09:35 PM. Reason: clarity
    Later,
    Chiz

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    • #3
      Re: Controlling dust on the TS and closing off the back

      check out this link:

      http://home.pacbell.net/jdismuk/sawdust.html

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      • #4
        Re: Controlling dust on the TS and closing off the back

        bench dog, unfortunately that design does not allow for the the blade to be tilted. I think the OP was looking for ideas that would also allow him to bevel the blade without having to remove the enclosure panel.

        I've seen pictures of a setup where the guy used two pieces of hardboard to enclose the backside of the saw. As you look at the back of the saw, he used one piece on the RH side of the back with a cutout for the belt to ride up and down in. On the LH side of the saw he had another piece of hardboard with a cutout for the thumb lever and another to match the arc that the motor will follow when beveling the blade. A third piece of hardboard could be used to cover the cutout of the arc for when the blade is not beveled.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Re: Controlling dust on the TS and closing off the back

          Unfortunately the motor and the mount travels in a wide arc which makes mounting a panel to the motor mount difficult. I think the best solution is the temporary one. That is panels with magnets or velco that ironhat recommended.
          Thanks everyone for the input.
          Steve

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          • #6
            Re: Controlling dust on the TS and closing off the back

            Originally posted by ironhat View Post
            There have been some solutions offered at www.BT3central.com for the Ryobi BT3000 saws. <snip>
            I couldn't find it for you. I believe that it was an arc shape which was slightly wider than the arc-shaped slot needed to accomodate the travel. Since a piece like this would end up striking the table top long before you were able to achieve 45* it would probably have to be two pieces - one of which would slide past the other. That said, I'd do it differently if you're still not sold on removing the back for these cuts (do you really do that many 45's?). Anyway, you could make a flexible curtain out of a piece of innertube or sheet rubber. I did this on the inner plywood bottom because I decided to keep the original blade shroud (OK, I'm crazy). I had to make a slot to accomodate the shroud snout extension that I attached for easier access. I used a piece of sheet rubber cut in a long rectangle, gluing the one end to the plywood. As I angle the blade the rubber bends and retracts out of the way and returns by itself, or with a little coaxing when the shroud returns to its home. Sorry 'bout the absence of photos.
            Later,
            Chiz

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