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Cabinet Strength

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  • Cabinet Strength

    I have a Bullet Reloading Workstation to build. All I can get from the customer is that the handle on the reloading mechanism requires a lot of force when pulled down. Apparently the reloading mechanism needs to be located near the front of the top. My plan was to build the subtop from two pieces of 3/4" plywood. On the section below where the reloader will be mounted I will probably build a bank of 16" wide drawers sandwiched between 3/4" plywood with no base recess for a toe kick. As an added precaution against 'racking' when the reloading lever is pulled I thought I would rabbet and glue in 3/4" plywood beneath where the drawers will be placed.

    Since I don't have a clue about reloading ( I only bow hunt) the questions I have are:

    1.) Are two pieces of 3/4" plywood strong enough for the subtop or would 3 or possibly 4 be better?

    2.) Should the sides, beneath where the reloader will sit, be made of two pieces of plywood instead of one?

    3.) Is the standard 4 1/2" toe kick setback space beneath the cabinet an issue? The workstation will be mounted securely to a wall.


    4.) Is 'racking' of the frame an issue with reloading as the handle is pulled?

    5.) The customer wants a wooden top. With what should the top be finished? Should the presence of gun powder or whatever other chemicals are used in reloading be given special consideration when selecting a top finish?

    I would most sincerely appreciate any suggestions anyone has regarding this project.

    Thanks,

    Tom

  • #2
    I've got some angle iron bolted underneath the desktop right under the press. That'll transfer the load over a large area.

    You don't need super heavy duty construction on the cabinet sides.. as long as it's strong enough to sit on, it'll be fine.

    I can't help you with the finish.. mine's laminate. I'd be more worried about the solvents than the powders, though.
    Last edited by ralphtheplumber; 01-18-2007, 11:15 AM.

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    • #3
      Re: Cabinet Strength

      Like Ralph says, some angle iron under where the press mounts that's tied into the frame of the cabinet at the back should hold it together. Another answer is some extra 2x4 on edge directly below where the press mounts would work, too. I've used the presses, and yes there is a goodly amount of force required. Your toekick setback will work, if you follow either of those suggestions. My buddy's is mounted using angle iron, and there's been no issues. We've done a whole bunch of reloading using that rig and the cabinet hasn't moved a milimeter!

      I'm getting more and more into bowhunting lately. I love how quiet it is, and the hunting techniques are so different! It's really a lot more of a challenge, but that much more rewarding. You still have to drag the thing thru the woods and up the mountain sooooo early in the morning.....now if only I could figure a way around that!!!
      I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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      • #4
        Re: Cabinet Strength

        Originally posted by Tom W View Post
        I have a Bullet Reloading Workstation to build. All I can get from the customer is that the handle on the reloading mechanism requires a lot of force when pulled down. Apparently the reloading mechanism needs to be located near the front of the top. My plan was to build the subtop from two pieces of 3/4" plywood. On the section below where the reloader will be mounted I will probably build a bank of 16" wide drawers sandwiched between 3/4" plywood with no base recess for a toe kick. As an added precaution against 'racking' when the reloading lever is pulled I thought I would rabbet and glue in 3/4" plywood beneath where the drawers will be placed.

        Since I don't have a clue about reloading ( I only bow hunt) the questions I have are:

        1.) Are two pieces of 3/4" plywood strong enough for the subtop or would 3 or possibly 4 be better?

        2.) Should the sides, beneath where the reloader will sit, be made of two pieces of plywood instead of one?

        3.) Is the standard 4 1/2" toe kick setback space beneath the cabinet an issue? The workstation will be mounted securely to a wall.


        4.) Is 'racking' of the frame an issue with reloading as the handle is pulled?

        5.) The customer wants a wooden top. With what should the top be finished? Should the presence of gun powder or whatever other chemicals are used in reloading be given special consideration when selecting a top finish?

        I would most sincerely appreciate any suggestions anyone has regarding this project.

        Thanks,

        Tom
        Tom the plywood will be just fine for strength just dado your bottom piece or even both pieces into the sides. make sure you leave 1icnh of material under your dado. but glue and screw them together before assembly and the screw them from the outside this will give more than ample strength for what you need the key is when you screw it to the wall use 3 in construction screws not drywall screws the have a shear strength of about 300 pounds each when driven up tight make sure you pre drill before you screw that way you do not take awy from the integrity of the nailer








        "Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of
        arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to
        skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly
        proclaiming . . "WOW ---What a Ride!"
        Last edited by woodweavil; 01-24-2007, 10:55 AM. Reason: left out a word
        "Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of
        arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to
        skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly
        proclaiming . . "WOW ---What a Ride!"

        Comment

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