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  • #16
    Re: trunion mounting

    Does it interfer with the belt? I believe that I would prefer an enclosed cabinet type saw not only for dust control, but I also dislike the motor hanging off the back. I have a very, very limited space to keep this in my garage. Of the different makes of saws which offer enclosed cabinets similar to the Hitachi without going to a full cabinet model? Priced within reach of course.
    I spoke with a Steel City salesperson about their 1.75 hp saw and he tried to talk me into the 3 hp model with the 50" fence for resale value. They also sell a 3 hp with a 30" fence but it runs right at $1000. More than I want to pay.
    In regards to the Hitachi, how can they advertise the C10FL as a 3 hp motor if it isn't? They also give the same 3 hp reading to their new cabinet saw, the C10LA. Oversite or intentional?
    Sorry to be so long winded.

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    • #17
      Re: trunion mounting

      Originally posted by dmr View Post
      Does it interfer with the belt? I believe that I would prefer an enclosed cabinet type saw not only for dust control, but I also dislike the motor hanging off the back. I have a very, very limited space to keep this in my garage. Of the different makes of saws which offer enclosed cabinets similar to the Hitachi without going to a full cabinet model? Priced within reach of course.
      I spoke with a Steel City salesperson about their 1.75 hp saw and he tried to talk me into the 3 hp model with the 50" fence for resale value. They also sell a 3 hp with a 30" fence but it runs right at $1000. More than I want to pay.
      In regards to the Hitachi, how can they advertise the C10FL as a 3 hp motor if it isn't? They also give the same 3 hp reading to their new cabinet saw, the C10LA. Oversite or intentional?
      Sorry to be so long winded.

      Sorry I didn't get back sooner but I was out of town.

      As for the Steel City saw be careful remember a good salesman will always try to ungrade you. There are thousands of saws and other tools sitting in garages all over this country that are never used or only used 1/10 of their potential. They are products of salesman ship where the a good salesman succeeded in convincing someone that they needed it.

      3 hp and 50 inch fences are nice but if you only need the capability once in a blue moon it is waste of money to buy, unless you subscribe to the nonsense that posessions define the person.

      As for the 3hp Hitachi claims what it it talking about is stall horse power versus normal use horsepower. In other words just before the motor stalls it produces 3hp but it were to sustain that output for longer than a few moments it would destroy itself. YOu often see this in shop vacs which claim 5 hp etc. It is marketing nonsense and is basically meaningless.

      Usable constant run horsepower is much lower. The best way to gauge actual horsepower is know that a horse power is close to 740 watts. If your using 110 that means 7 amps = 1 hp. Most saw builders manufacture saws to work on common home circuits which are 15 amp circuits. Than means the most usable horsepower is around 1 1/2 to 2 max depending on the motor efficiency. (no motor is 100% efficient) ( don't recall the exact number of watts but use the general rule 7 amps per horsepower max and you won't be to far wrong.)

      Since the US market believes bigger is better, marketing always tries to state pumped up horsepower numbers. One of the Air compressor manufactures got caught in this with their compressors and through a class action suit had to offer a rebate to customers. Now most manufactures include a disclosure clause in tiny tiny print explaining that the horsepower they claim is not the normal usable horsepower of the machine.

      As for the Hitachi saw. It would be my guess if you used your saw every weekend for the rest of your life, the saw would still be able to be passed down to your children and probably to their children.

      I know a production door shop that uses a cheap contractor saw 12 hours a day for 6 days every week and has been doing it for the last 15 years.
      Rev Ed

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      • #18
        Re: trunion mounting

        Ed, can you comment on dmr's other question? The solution looks like it has possibilities but I too would be worried about wrapping the cloth around the belt and doing major damage to the saw and maybe myself. Does the boot have stays in it that hold the shape and keep the cloth from getting caught up in the belt?

        Originally Posted by dmr
        Does it interfer with the belt?

        "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
        John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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        • #19
          Re: trunion mounting

          Originally posted by dmr View Post
          Does it interfer with the belt? I believe that I would prefer an enclosed cabinet type saw not only for dust control, but I also dislike the motor hanging off the back. I have a very, very limited space to keep this in my garage. Of the different makes of saws which offer enclosed cabinets similar to the Hitachi without going to a full cabinet model? Priced within reach of course.
          I spoke with a Steel City salesperson about their 1.75 hp saw and he tried to talk me into the 3 hp model with the 50" fence for resale value. They also sell a 3 hp with a 30" fence but it runs right at $1000. More than I want to pay.
          In regards to the Hitachi, how can they advertise the C10FL as a 3 hp motor if it isn't? They also give the same 3 hp reading to their new cabinet saw, the C10LA. Oversite or intentional?
          Sorry to be so long winded.
          Extra HP is always nice, but not a necessity for a hobby shop. Also note that a true 3hp motor will require 220v. That's why the hybrids and contractor saws are so appealing to hobbyists....they'll run on a standard 20 amp 110v circuit, yet with the right blade, they'll cut anything you need them to.

          What Hitachi is doing with the motor rating on that saw is really bordering on unethical, but I'm sure their lawyers have done their homework. It used to be quite commonplace with compressor motors and many of the late 80s, early 90's Craftsman contractor saws, but a lawsuit against the compressor companies has pretty much put an end to the practice with induction motors anyway...universal motors are another story! (I don't believe for a minute that my Ridgid shop vac puts out 6.25hp or that my 15 amp Milwaukee router is really 3.5hp )

          If you're really tight on space but don't want to step down to the portable jobsite class saws, General International has an interesting new offering that appears to be a full size cast iron hybrid on a rolling stowaway type base...if it's not full size it's very close....from what I can glean it appears to be 25" deep, which is 2" shorter than a standard full size, but is ~ 5" deeper than many portables. It's a bit larger than the plastic/aluminum portables that have universal motors, but it sports a belt drive 2hp induction motor that's mounted inside the enclosure. I know nothing about this specific model other than what I've seen online, but GI is typically considered a good quality name with good value. This is a really interesting new category IMHO.....it'll definitely fill a niche for those who struggle accommodating a typical full size saw. FWIW, the actual saw portion of the GI 50-090 appears to be very similar to the Jet 708100 hybrid that mates to a typical open splayed leg stand.

          http://www.general.ca/pagemach/machines/50090a.html
          Attached Files
          Last edited by hewood; 02-05-2007, 05:06 PM.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: trunion mounting

            Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
            Ed, can you comment on dmr's other question? The solution looks like it has possibilities but I too would be worried about wrapping the cloth around the belt and doing major damage to the saw and maybe myself. Does the boot have stays in it that hold the shape and keep the cloth from getting caught up in the belt?

            Originally Posted by dmr
            Does it interfer with the belt?

            Bob
            I haven't seen the bag myself but from what I read and heard from others, it is made of fairly stiff canvas like material that keeps it's shape.
            As I understand the concept the bag is attached to the back of your saw and then pulling it taut you attach it around the belt guard at the motor. Therefore the fabric is held away from the belt. Now as you crank in bevel the fabric twists but because of frabrics stiffness and how taut it is while the belt may rub on it there is nothing to catch and get wrapped up.

            One of the guys on another forum had his wife sew him one up. He hard mounted it to the back of the saw, using screw through strips of wood with the material looped over them. He then used a nylon tie lock strip that held the material firmly on the belt shield. He said he pulled the fabric as tight as he could without having it pull on the motor or warp the shield out of shape. On his even with the blade a 45 the fabric was not touching the belt anywhere. He was very happy with it.

            Personally with the lower dust shield on the Ridgid I don't see dust being a big problem. Remember not even cabinet saws catch "all" the dust from cutting. I always end up vaccuming the floor when I finish each day.

            Another suggestion would be the "Shark guard" for a Ridgid. These are made by a guy out of Lexan and replace the upper blade guard and splitter. The Shark Guard has a port that you can attach a vac to. That way you would have two ports for the vac. One sucking from below the table and old above. I would think with a fairly good Vac you would catch just about all of the dust.
            Ed
            Rev Ed

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: trunion mounting

              Originally posted by hewood View Post
              Extra HP is always nice, but not a necessity for a hobby shop. Also note that a true 3hp motor will require 220v. That's why the hybrids and contractor saws are so appealing to hobbyists....they'll run on a standard 20 amp 110v circuit, yet with the right blade, they'll cut anything you need them to.

              What Hitachi is doing with the motor rating on that saw is really bordering on unethical, but I'm sure their lawyers have done their homework. It used to be quite commonplace with compressor motors and many of the late 80s, early 90's Craftsman contractor saws, but a lawsuit against the compressor companies has pretty much put an end to the practice with induction motors anyway...universal motors are another story! (I don't believe for a minute that my Ridgid shop vac puts out 6.25hp or that my 15 amp Milwaukee router is really 3.5hp )

              If you're really tight on space but don't want to step down to the portable jobsite class saws, General International has an interesting new offering that appears to be a full size cast iron hybrid on a rolling stowaway type base...if it's not full size it's very close....from what I can glean it appears to be 25" deep, which is 2" shorter than a standard full size, but is ~ 5" deeper than many portables. It's a bit larger than the plastic/aluminum portables that have universal motors, but it sports a belt drive 2hp induction motor that's mounted inside the enclosure. I know nothing about this specific model other than what I've seen online, but GI is typically considered a good quality name with good value. This is a really interesting new category IMHO.....it'll definitely fill a niche for those who struggle accommodating a typical full size saw. FWIW, the actual saw portion of the GI 50-090 appears to be very similar to the Jet 708100 hybrid that mates to a typical open splayed leg stand.

              http://www.general.ca/pagemach/machines/50090a.html
              Now that is a neat saw! Put it in one of those mobile saw centers often featured in Wood magazine or as built by Ryobi BT3.com users along with a router station and you would have a fantastic setup.

              I can see it sitting there in a custom made cabinet with plenty of drawers and storage slots for all accessories.
              Rev Ed

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