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Shop floor???

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  • Shop floor???

    Need a few suggestions for my shop floor. In my garage er I mean shop I have large expansion joints in the floor like most garage floors have. While moving the TS of course the wheels get stuck in the grooves. Any ideas how to create a smooth transition fo the TS to pass over the grooves?

  • #2
    Re: Shop floor???

    Strips of plywood with beveled edgs comes to mind. Needs to be fairly thin, and the bevel should be a pretty long one. You could glue the plywood on top of the expansion material, I think. Not sure of how that would affect the joint. I think as long as you don't glue it to both the joint and the surrounding concrete, you'd be ok.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: Shop floor???

      Level off the joints with urethane. Dump some Sonneborn on there, and screed it down with a credit card. Make sure everything is clean and dry, or it won't stick right.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Shop floor???

        I have a similar "crack" in my basement floor. Mine is from an old retainer wall for coal. Yes my house is that old lol. It had a coal furnace at one time but it has been renovated since before i moved in. In either case i have this 2 inch wide by 1.5inch deep V crack in floor where the wall was built. All i did was cut a piece of hardwood to size, painted it and just set in the crack.When i redo the whole floor I will fill it all in with new cement tho.

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        • #5
          Re: Shop floor???

          For my basement shop, I'm using a plywood product called Dri-Core. Basically it's a 2 x 2 tongue and groove treated plywood block that has a PVC sheet on the underside. It provides a much better base to stand on, blocks moisture, and provides a smooth surface for tools or additional covering. Home Depot sells it for about $5 a square. (www.dricore.com)

          If my work area in the garage was now dedicated to shop space, I'd probably take the same approach. I don't like concrete as a floor surface. Too often moisture is a problem and it's really hard on the legs.

          CWS

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          • #6
            Re: Shop floor???

            CWS

            Did you apply a sealer to your concrete floor first? I hope adding the new flooring doesn't create a sealed in moisture problem for you. I too find that wood flooring is much nicer than concrete when it comes to comfort.

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            • #7
              Re: Shop floor???

              looks like to me if you just laid out a plastic sheet on the concrete and then some thin sleepers and regular 4x8 sheets of T&G wafer board underlayment you have the same thing,

              your still will need to seal the surface or cover with a finish floor for long term durability, from what I see.
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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              • #8
                Re: Shop floor???

                Woussko,

                A sealer is recommended for problem areas. I don't get seepage, but during the rainy season, there will be some condensation if I lay a sheet of plastic down against the concrete. With that kind of moisture, you can end up with mildew and mold problems where any wood or other material contacts the concrete.

                With the Dri-Core, the OSB is treated and the PVC sheet on the bottom of the 2 x 2 panels have a molded stand-off pattern, which allows ventilation under the panels. (Even with these standoffs, the loading per sq. inch is pretty high.) They also provide instructions for leaving proper spacing around the edges and occasional vent openings if the area is large. So during a wet period, I plan on using the Dehumidifier. But at least I don't have to worry about anything laying on the floor soaking up the moisture or turning into a mildew farm. Check out the web site ( www.dricore.com ), as they provide pretty decent information and their 800 Technical assistance/help line is very friendly. I believe Lowes has a competitive product but it was about a dollar higher per panel.

                Between the 2 x 2 size and the T & G, it is easy to handle and install. If the floor is not even, they also sell leveling pads to help with the installation. I used some thick roofing material that I had left over from a job to level the panels in a couple of places where my floor was uneven.

                I hope this helps,

                CWS

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Shop floor???

                  CWS

                  Thanks for the info and I hope it all works well for you. I like that air can flow under the panels. Mold and mildew can be real problems where there is dampness. The dehumidifier is a very good idea.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Shop floor???

                    Originally posted by ralphtheplumber View Post
                    Dump some Sonneborn on there, and screed it down with a credit card.
                    Make sure you use the wife's credit card! LOL!!

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