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Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

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  • #16
    Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

    Curiouser and curiouser...Upon further review...a cross-section of this wall board shows two distinct 'strata', one white like current wall board, the other more of a putty color. The whiter layer is 3/8" thick and is faced on both sides with brownish paper. It shows a stencil but no brand logo...stencil reads "S5Y29D2". The white inner layer is very rounded at the seams and it looks now like the second 3/8" 'layer' is not faced with paper but might be a thick mud layer that fills the seams and accounts for the finished face of the wall(plus 50 years of paint). If this is a plaster veneer, somebody did a fantastic job of smoothing the walls in this rather modest 1956 ranch. Did I mention the second(room side) layer is 3/8" thick?!? What in the world held this in place?(IF it was added as a veneer and not part of the 'wallboard'.)

    In any event, I have made the major cuts with a little trimming to finish things off. Still managed to get dust throughout much of the house(despite the fine tips I got from board members). Not down to brass tacks by any means...I must decide whether I want two sections to the 42" wide base 'cabinet' with drawers on one side and shelves on the other OR take the easy way out with just shelves. The finished opening will be 36" and I'll put double doors on the front of the base and leave the TV area on top open(until DW decides she wants disappearing doors to hide the TV).

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    • #17
      Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

      Doors and drawers the answer, to keep the sheetrock dust out from your next project, lol.......
      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

      http://www.contractorspub.com

      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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      • #18
        Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

        Humm, there was a time when wood lathe fell out of favor just prior to expanded metal lathe that a base similar to sheet rock was used in place of the scratch and brown plaster coats (if it was a three coat plaster job). The white coat would be what ever thickness was need to make the wall flat and true. A few feet left or right might only be 1/4" thick, some areas might be 1/2" or as little as 1/16" , it's whatever it took to strike the wall smooth. You had to start with the highest part and get your minimum thickness for a good finish, then everything that was lower than that had to be filled in. If that meant there would be 3/8" of white so be it. I can remember this process being used in the 60s and even early 70s in government buildings which always seem to lag behind in construction technology. Heck, I remember running CI soil pipe and all the underground had to be lead and oakum, the state didn't trust rubber gaskets or no-hub joints on underground. All the backvent was galvanized screw pipe, when was the last time you did new construction using those outdated materials?
        ---------------
        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
        ---------------
        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
        ---------
        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
        ---------
        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

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        • #19
          Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

          CoachRick,
          This is sounding more like plaster lath or as it's sometimes called, rock lath. I haven't seen it with a paper face, but that doesn't mean another manufacturer in a different part of country didn't make it with paper face.
          Plaster lath is really really hard to saw with a conventional dry wall jab saw.
          Jim Don

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          • #20
            Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

            CoachRick: Sound definitely like a plastered house that was very common in the late 40's and 50's. First a 3/8" "rocklath" was nailed on, (gray or brownissh paper-covered with rounded edges) then a "brown coat" (actually grayish white in color) was put on with a trowel and then a finish or"putty coat" (white in color) to give a smooth finish. Total thickness -3/4". Cutting through this would give the results exactly as you described.
            Jim

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            • #21
              Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

              Originally posted by garager View Post
              Doors and drawers the answer, to keep the sheetrock dust out from your next project, lol.......
              WAY too funny! I'll be de-dusting things for a week!

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                Thanks for the stroll through sheetrock history, guys! If I manage to pull this off without driving DW crazy, this has given me the idea of built-in bookshelves in the same room--recessed into the wall above the basement stairs. Before I attempt that, I need to become familiar with the new Kreg pocket hole system I bought, using this project as justification for the purchase.

                I am a little puzzled as to finishing the 'toe kick' area of the new setup. There is cheesey baseboard with floor-matching quarter-round on either side of the closet/cabinet. Not sure if a recessed toe-kick is appropriate or if I can scribe the face-frame to the floor without any trim...might have to let DW decide that finishing touch.

                Thanks again for all the info!
                Last edited by 10sCoachRick; 02-08-2007, 04:39 PM.

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                • #23
                  Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                  Bob D,

                  Hey, I remember helping my Dad do that kind of cast iron "sewer pipe" work back in the late 50's and early 60's. My part of job would be tapping down the oakum rope in the joint flange, with a couple of irons and a mallet, then Dad had a rope-like device he would wrap around the top of the flange (used when pouring into a horizontal run), packing it in slightly to seal the edge, and then using a cast iron ladle to pour in the molten lead. Seems a bit archaic when looking back on it, but at the time, it certainly seemed like the best way to do the job.

                  We did a few houses with 4-inch copper that was a bear to solder. As I recall, you had to use a big blow torch. I can't begine to imagine what that would cost at today's copper prices.

                  When plastic first came out, he sort of scoffed at it; but by that time, I decided plumbing was not going to be a life for me. Instead, I opted for a factory job and later an office and a drawing board. I remember that he wasn't particularly happy with me, commenting that, "perhaps I felt I was too good to get my hands dirty". Not sure that "too good" was the case, but in my late teens I couldn't imagine a worse way to spend my working life.

                  10sCoachRick,

                  I'm not sure what look you're going for. When I dry walled the new areas of present home, I wanted to keep the "classic" look to the place and used painted 1 x 6 pine for the base board and a 2" cap molding. The floor is carpeted so I didn't use a 1/4 round at the base.

                  With the home we're remodling, the base boards are oak and using a 1/4 round at the bottom and a cove molding at the top. Past owners and painters have pretty much destroyed the top cove molding. So the baseboard is being stripped and refinished, keeping it's natural early American oak look. But the cove molding is being replaced with a painted cap molding to match the walls.

                  Dust, you can't imagine... when I finally had enough of the mess that the painters and plaster guys were making, I asked them to leave. After almost three months of them in the house, there must have been one to two inches of plaster dust everywhere. I'm still trying to get it out of the house.

                  CWS
                  Last edited by CWSmith; 02-08-2007, 05:27 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                    My house was built in '54 and has 1/2 sheetrock with holes drilled all over it. It then got a coat of plaster that is about 1/4" thick! Makes for one tough wall!

                    I feel for ya on cutting out a wall. I decided we needed big sliding mirror doors on our closet since it was about 6' wide in the inside with a 2' door! I got the sheetrock/plaster crap cut but could not cut the 2/4's. They were 50 years old and Doug Fir, hard as concrete! I ended up opening the bedroom window, turning on the evap cooler and brought in the chain saw! (no kidding!) I cut the 2/4's and let the cooler blow "most" of the crap out the window onto my neighbors car! (they don't like me anyway, this just helped things along some.) When the smoke and dust cleared, I framed it in and hung the doors. Presto!!! Mirror'd closet doors!

                    Mark
                    Congratulations to Mr. "the sky is falling" Al Gore, nominated the new Village Idiot!

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                    • #25
                      Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                      CW With that kind of a mess, you might try calling in a commercial air duct and furnace cleaning company to come by with their big truck engine powered super vac and hog it up for you. Also, try chimney and stack cleaning services. They have super ash vacs.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                        Mark, Believe me, I thought about the chain saw! The studs I pulled out were very solid and not a knot in sight! There was even some ciphering on one of the studs showing just under $1k in 1956 dollars total. Since I am told the house cost $18k originally, I can only wonder what they were figuring. Unfortunately, no treasure buried within the walls! Interesting that the lumber used to case the door was not as clear as the studs within the walls. I'll reuse some of it but not for trim. Boy, did they like their 16 and 20 penny nails back then!

                        As is the case in a lot of America, some of the <1 acre lots are losing their original houses and selling for $300k with another $300k going into the new house! I'm not sure I would want to carry a $700k spec house or two and hope the market holds up! Could be why I chose tennis over real estate! Of course, none of the new houses have a charming fallout shelter in the basement as a conversation piece!

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                        • #27
                          Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                          Woussko,

                          Thanks for the suggestion, I wish I would have thought about that early on. As it was, I sept up a good percentage of it, then vacuumed, then damp mopped, then scrub brushed. Over the tops of the doors in took vacuuming, then vac'd again using a stiff brush to help remove the more stubborn dust. Then I wet brushed it and wiped it down with a wet rag. That part is now done. Next comes vacuuming out all the registers and cold air ducts. I've got a guy coming over to do that sometime in the next week or so.

                          I'm replacing the entire heating system this coming summer along with first floor hot and cold air ducts. I'm also putting in new laminate flooring on the first floor. It currently has oak, but that's from 1887, so you can imagine how worn they are. It's probably been sanded a few times, but I there are drilled holes everywhere, as well as plywood inserts where they removed the register plates from the old gravity heating system. The replacement for those was those cheap tin corner registers. I'm going to be putting cast plates back into the floor, but that's another story!

                          Thanks for the suggestion,

                          CWS

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                          • #28
                            Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                            CWS Glad to help if I can. You should take a good look at the Milwaukee heavy duty vacs. If the one I love the model 8925 scares you off, look at the model 8911. It's no toy. What really sells them besides being built machines, is that they take huge high quality dirt/dust collection bags.

                            Please see here (machines) http://www.milwaukeeconnect.com/weba..._192222_192137

                            and here too (all manor of accessories and such) http://www.milwaukeeconnect.com/weba..._192628_192327

                            Milwaukee's good models: 8911, 8912, 8925, 8926 and 8945 The 8945 is the power head without the drum or anything else. It's mostly for replacement. Their other models are not near as good. The good ones are made under contract by Mastercraft Industries. The lesser models are made by ShopVac Corp.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                              Hey, those Milwaukee vacs are nice. The 8945 motor head would be great with an adapter collar to fit a 30 Gal steel trash can or even a 55 gal drum.

                              I know they make them (to fit 55g drums), I've seen them on the job, but never had cause to see who the manufacturer was.
                              ---------------
                              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                              ---------------
                              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                              ---------
                              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                              ---------
                              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                                Bob D. and others

                                You might like seeing these too. - External filter vacs that sit on a 55 gallon drum
                                http://www.tornadovac.com/store/category.aspx?pid=29

                                And here - The company that makes the good ones for Milwaukee
                                http://www.mastercraftusa.com/Home.htm
                                Last edited by Woussko; 02-11-2007, 01:07 PM.

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