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Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

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  • Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

    Greetings all...not exactly a Ridgid-specific question but here goes---
    I'll be cutting a larger opening around a closet door in our 50's ranch that has sheetrock walls...not the wallboard stuff with which I am more familiar. The question is--how can I minimize the dust thrown off by cutting the opening? I think the way to go is with a jig saw to minimize the dust and maintain control over the cut(rather than use a recip or circular saw that would, I imagine, throw off much more dust). Of course, I'll put up a poly barrier but the room is in the middle of the house and I'm hoping to contain the dust as much as possible. Any thoughts before I start putting holes in the wall??? Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

    keyhole saw, by hand and elbow grease. If you don't want to do it that way, get a wet and dry vac., with a sheetrock dust bag in it and have someone hold the hose while you do the cutting. No matter what, your dealing w/sheetrock dust and it gets everywhere. You can even try misting w/ a squirt bottle as you cut, just be very very careful since you have electricity involved. Have fun...
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

      Duct tape the hose from a shop vac to the side of your jigsaw if it doesn't have dust collection built-in. This will suck up most of the dust as you cut, saving you from breathing it and also some cleanup time. Alternatively you could have someone follow along and hold the nozzle close to the saw which would work too.
      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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      • #4
        Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

        Thanks for the tips! Today, I cut from the inside of the closet so I had the luxury of sealing off the opening with poly and clamps--keeping almost all the dust inside the closet for me to inhale. Pretty tight quarters in there and the cut was not as precise as I hope to make the outside cut. I'll clamp a straight-edge as a guide for the outside cut---probably with a jigsaw and fairly aggressive blade since I now know what the inside of the wall contains...no electrical, thankfully and only one spacer on either side of the door framing. I had not used a filter bag with the Shop-vac before today--works great! I'll try to suck up the dust as I cut the outer opening tomorrow, maybe taping the nozzle to my wrist if not the saw--or perhaps I could train our Scottie to hold the vac hose for me!

        By-the-by, does anyone know the time frame during which the present-day wallboard became so popular compared to the sheetrock we have in our house?

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        • #5
          Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

          I guess you will have to define "present day wall board" and "sheetrock" for me. I started in construction in 1950 and they have been the same. I don't know what you have in your house, so a little definition would be helpful.
          Jim

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          • #6
            Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

            A short history of wallboard.
            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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            • #7
              Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

              Originally posted by Pipestone Kid View Post
              I guess you will have to define "present day wall board" and "sheetrock" for me. I started in construction in 1950 and they have been the same. I don't know what you have in your house, so a little definition would be helpful.
              Jim
              Well now...thickness for thickness, this stuff on our walls makes current wallboard look like paper mache. Wouldn't want to try to put a fist through what I just removed from the closet. For some reason, I had always thought the original 'Sheetrock' was a tougher, heavier version of what is commonly used today. I'll check for a 'brand' on the stuff in our house; circa 1956.

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              • #8
                Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                Are you possibly confusing sheet rock with plaster lath?
                Sheet rock will have paper backing on both front and back sides.
                Plaster lath will NOT have any paper backing anywhere. It is often put on double thickness and then covered with plaster -- not drywall mud. You would have to be near the strength of Lou Ferigno to put your fist through plaster lath.
                Just wondering.
                Jim Don

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                • #9
                  Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                  Originally posted by JimDon View Post
                  Are you possibly confusing sheet rock with plaster lath?
                  Sheet rock will have paper backing on both front and back sides.
                  Plaster lath will NOT have any paper backing anywhere. It is often put on double thickness and then covered with plaster -- not drywall mud. You would have to be near the strength of Lou Ferigno to put your fist through plaster lath.
                  Just wondering.
                  Jim Don
                  No plaster and lath here, thank goodness. I checked the section I removed and there is no logo or brand--just what appears to be a lot number. There is definitely a paper backing on both sides with considerable 'mud' on the joints. While I can saw through a 'current' wall board easily using a drywall saw or recip saw with a demo blade, this stuff is much tougher and chunks off much more along the cut line, even though the inside of the closet likely has only one coat of paint on it...no extra 'mud' except at the joints. Also, unlike current wallboard, this stuff leaves a crater when nails are removed by pulling straight out. A 'self-tapping' wall anchor will simply chunk out a big hole before finally sinking in...nothing like current wallboard. It's almost as though there is a plaster veneer on both sides even though I can see the paper backing on the back side and it appears not too deep on the painted side. Oh well, tomorrow, I will cut through the 'business' side of the wall and begin reframing for the new opening. Then, I get to build my first ever cabinet 'from scratch'. Thanks again for all the tips!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                    I've done a lot of remodeling here in Minnesota and what I think is going on is the aging of sheetrock. In my opinion I'm no scientist, it starts to become slightly petrified ( many years down the road ), I do see a difference between old sheetrock and new. The substance they use could be the same, it's just the characteristic changes after time. Or maybe they did use chemicals instead of water back then when they made gypsum boards, anyhow I do know what 10scoachrick means, but I think it is age. I'm sure this will be debatable. If it was plaster and he was cutting through with a demo blade, that blade would be dull in a matter of seconds, plaster is like cutting through concrete.
                    Last edited by garager; 02-07-2007, 06:03 AM.
                    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                    http://www.contractorspub.com

                    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                      10s--Garager may be right--it is aging. Also, sheetrock comes in different thickness-3/8", 1/2", and 5/8" are standard and you can even special order 3/4". (Usually if 3/4" is required two layers of 3/8" are glued together) I don't know what the "common" use is in your area, but Bob D.'s "short history" says it all.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                        At present I have two homes, having purchased an old 1887 house about a year and a half ago. We're still wrangling with remodeling on that and have yet to move in. Definitely plaster and lath throughout that, and in some places, a former remodeler just slapped drywall over those original walls. Poor job, as when doing so, the dry wall was simply placed over the plaster sections, cutting around door molding, baseboards, etc. It looks ridiculouse and I'm pulling a lot of that stuff off in order to get back to the original plaster and do the repairs properly.

                        However, in my present home, which was build around 1920, there is plaster lath in all but a previously remodeled kitchen, dinette area that was done in either the late 40's or early 50's. When we moved in about 28 years ago, I remodeled the kitchen and rewired the area, getting rid of the aluminum wiring. Their is definitely sheetrock on the walls (been into the wall from both sides). But this stuff is about 3/4 inch thick and is almost like concrete with fibers. While I've heard of old homes using horse hair impregnated plaster, I would presume that such things were done well before the 20's. In any case, this stuff is really hard, to the point where it will wear the teeth right off a standard sabre saw blade.

                        I don't have a brand name on it, and although it could be just hardened plasterboard, the fiber content and grey concrete/plaster texture make me think it is something else; perhaps an obscur brand that is no longer in use.

                        CWS

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                        • #13
                          Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                          Since ancient times, natural fibers have been used to reinforce brittle materials. For example,
                          thousands of years ago, Egyptians began using straw and horsehair to reinforce and improve the
                          properties of mud bricks (Mehta and Monterio 1993; Bentur and Mindess 1990). In more recent
                          times, large-scale commercial use of asbestos fibers in a cement paste matrix began with the
                          invention of the Hatschek process in 1898 (ACI 544.1R 1996). However primarily due to health
                          hazards associated with asbestos fibers, alternate fiber types have been investigated and
                          introduced throughout the 1960’s and 1970’s (ACI 544.1R 1996). Among the most promising
                          replacements for asbestos are natural fibers.
                          Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                          http://www.contractorspub.com

                          A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                            It's a little late, but roto-zip has an attachment to hook up your shop-vac.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Sheetrock dust abatement...???...

                              In my old house I remember sections where the plaster and lath were replaced with some type of wallboard in the late 40s. The previous owner who had lived in the home since 1918 told us that's when the work was done. This stuff had a dark grey/brown core behind a tough multi-layer paper facing on both sides. It was much tougher than todays' Sheetrock no matter who it is made by. It was harder to cut (I was adding outlets in some rooms using a jabsaw) and crumbled into larger chunks than todays Sheetrock does. To get a smooth edge I would cut through the paper with a utility knife ( a trick which works well even today). The inside was almost the color of DUROCK® but it wasn't.
                              "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                              https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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