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  • TS 3650 arbor question

    I have read here many times about the arbor problem with this saw and I never paid much attention to it since at the time I had no plans to use a dado blade, guess what now I do LOL. Can someone tell me if there is a spacific serial # or something to identify if my saw will have this problem and if I do what or where or even how do you get it resolved? I know, I know if I just paid attention in class we would not have to go over this again, LOL
    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: TS 3650 arbor question

    Try a search on these three forums for a photo of the offending arbor. To me it was easy to see - looked like the threads were missing at the flange. I sure wish they hadn't screwed that one up and if I had it to do again I would disassemble the table top and remove the trunnions to press in the new one. I had on *e** of a time and it's not in as far as it should be. I have red Loc-Tite on the end, more to see if it moves than to keep it tight.
    Last edited by ironhat; 02-22-2007, 06:13 PM. Reason: spelling
    Later,
    Chiz

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    • #3
      Re: TS 3650 arbor question

      Here's the pic:

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      • #4
        Re: TS 3650 arbor question

        Thanks for the info.

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        • #5
          Re: TS 3650 arbor question

          This may be a dumb question but here it is anyways. If you have the bad arbor, which I don't thank God, what could happen while the saw is in use, IE.: blade could be tight but start to spin freely, vibration, chatter, etc...? Thought I'd ask this question cause I couldn't find an answer anywhere and figured it would be a good idea to find out for others that might have the incorrect/bad arbor of what the dangers, if any, are when using the bad arbor.

          Thanks
          Woodworker

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          • #6
            Re: TS 3650 arbor question

            If memory serves me right, when using a dado set on the defective arbor, the chipper over this area will drop into the open thread and will not be concentric with the outer blade and other chippers. The cut dado will have a groove in the bottom due to the high side of the misaligned chipper.

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            • #7
              Re: TS 3650 arbor question

              If the chipper drops into the groove, it will cause the problem that billmoy stated. More dangerous is that with the chipper dropped into the groove, it prevents it from being snugged up against the first outside cutter, causing the whole stack to be insecure (one side would be tight but the other loose). This could potentially result in the chipper jumping up during cutting and then you would have a loose stackup. That could in turn lead to damaged arbor, damaged blade, damaged drive assembly, damaged work, and damaged worker!!. There is a lot of kinetic energy in that heavy dado stack spinning at 3450 rpm. I personally wouldn't want to be around if a dado set started shedding carbide teeth!!. By the way, the shims used to microadjust the dado width can drop and wedge in a thread even on a good arbor and cause the same problem if you are not paying attention.
              In reality, the problem should be noticed before-hand if the user performed the routine check of eyeing the stack and spinning it after tightening the nut, as well as making sure it spun free after installing the insert and raising the blade to the desired height. If running it up through a new insert, the tap, tap, tap of the high tooth should alert the user to shut things down and check.
              A side benefit of ZCIs is that they will let you know pretty quick if the blade is not aligned with the arbor, as it will scrub the side. I usually initially make my Dado ZCIs only slightly more than the depth of cut I plan to make with that width. Therefore, even if using the same width, I may be using a different height setting. Therefore, I have made it a practice to give the blade a spin after getting it to cut height. For shallow dados, I usually just give the pulley belt a tug to make sure it spins free (saves cuts on the fingers and I do this BEFORE I plug the saw back in). By doing this, I have caught myself more than once running the blade up to the point where it has jammed against the insert before I powered up the saw. That told me to run it down and bring the blade up under power to recut the insert to get where I need to be (I remove the insert, bring the blade up to my desired height, count turns down to full bottom, reinstall insert, call myself a dumb***, plug in saw and then bring it back up under power about a half turn past where the height I want to be measures. Shut down and unplug saw and do final exact height measurement). Yeah, it takes some time, but it makes me slow down and focus on what I am doing.
              I usually apologize for a long-winded post but I am not going to apologize for preachin' safety

              Go
              Practicing at practical wood working

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