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  • #16
    Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

    Why didn't I think of that? A palm nailer sounds like a great suggestion. I have a Bostitch palm nailer that I've used a few times for toe-nailing in hard to reach areas of a patio cover and 2x4 trimmers above a door header, and each time it's worked great. It's not as fast as a framing nailer, but it's safe and drives just about any type and size of nail you can find.

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    • #17
      Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

      Definately the palm nailer.Good job jbergstrom.One side note, check for durability,I have heard some brands have had problems with the diaphrams not holding up through periods of extended use.

      Thank you gentlemen for the information on hemlock.

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      • #18
        Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

        I was think palm nailer too. One thing about using screws instead of nails is they do not have the same lateral strength as nails do. Screws will break where nails will bend, thus not recommended for framing. Out here in earthquake country it is an issue (at least with building codes). One thing about palm nailers to consider as well is that using them for extended periods of time is bad for your joints, the vibration is fierce. I know this from back when I first tried a palm nailer and wondered why people ever used hammers at all. (I found out) Just for places where your slap hammer won't swing is probably a good bet.
        A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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        • #19
          Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

          I never heard of a palm nailer, but it sounds like the answer to a maiden's prayer. I talked to my buddy at the lumber yard and he told me that the studs they get are unclassified and are likely to be any S-P-F or a mix of all so, so much for using screws. Besides, a nailer is likely to be useful in a lot of different applications. Regarding screws, I totally agree that square heads are the only way to fly. I looked at the palm nailer reviews in Amazon.com and the only knock I found related to the shock on the hand by the pounding of the nailer on the palm. Since my use would be intermittent at best I don't think this would be a problem. The jig that drtyhands suggested will work for me witha nail gun, so probably will work with the palm nailer. I'm going to try to get to HD this weekend and see what they have.
          Does anybody have recommendations as to brand? It looks like the average cost is around $100 since I already have the compressor. Boy does this tool sound like it was made for a blind guy. Frankly, I'm not crazy about trying to use a nail gun. Might put out one of my eyes.
          Incidentally, you might wonder how I see to use this Forum. I have a screen reader that reads text and translates it into sound. It's called "Jaws" and really helps a lot. The only problem is that it can't read graphics (photos and plans for instance).
          Thanks for all your suggestions.
          Blind Bill

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          • #20
            Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

            Bill,

            Bostitch PN100 Palm Impact Nailer is the one I have and I'm happy with it. It gets great reviews, and more importantly, it works well.

            good luck...

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            • #21
              Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

              Although I peronally own a palm nailer,the Senco brand is the one desired in my area.It's durable enough to hold up to employees who don't care about the bosses tools,it is $200.00.

              The next choice,I have heard is the $100.00 craftsman for the occasional use of a home owner who's finding it hard to nail something in a tight spot.

              sounds like a lot of nails involved in your particular project.I wish someone downhere in my network could have given me some information on the bostich that I could pass on.

              Also I don't know if the leather wrap comes with either of these nailers.But they absorb some of the vibration,and also becuase of the tools air exhaust port configuration they help keeping the compressor moisture and pneumatic oil off your hands.

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              • #22
                Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                The only good Senco palm nailer is the A9 which is discontinued, but you can still find them new on ebay or some online stores. Stay away from the newer A20 model which is a cheapened unit. The old A9 models were professional grade and made in USA. The A20 is worse than most off brand nailers.

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                • #23
                  Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                  I went to HD this weekend looking for palm nailers. I was disappointed to see that they only had one - a Semco that only had one nose - and that for large framing nails (16d and above). I'm thinking now that a palm nailer is what I need and that the best buy would be either a PC 650 or a Bostich. Both have three noses that accept brads, finish nails and a wide variety of framing nails. Both have padded leather grips. The PC also has a hammer (although I can't imagine what for). Amazon.com seems to have as good a price as anybody and doesn't charge for shipping. Now the next question: I think I'm also in the market for a new compressor. Do you think a 2 gallon Husky or equal would be enough oomph to run the palm nailer? I'm in somewhat tight quarters and would like the compressor to be somewhat quiet. Would a pancake type oil-less compressor run me out of the shop?

                  Your comments are invaluable to me. Thanks a bunch!

                  Blind Bill

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                  • #24
                    Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                    Bill, I don't use palm nailer but I have seen many other guys use them, they don't need to much volume of air, but I think you would want to go with at least a 7 gal tank, or you'll be listening to your compressor every second you run your nailer. As far as compressors being loud, I think there all loud, instead of you running out of the shop, set your compressor out the door and run with a 25 or 50 foot hose, this should save you from the noise, however your neighbors won't like it. Just drill a hole through the door or wall and have a swivel plate mounted over the hole when not in use at least the hole would be covered. Amazon has always been good to me, and the shipping part in most cases have also been decent. Good luck Bill

                    mark
                    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                    http://www.contractorspub.com

                    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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                    • #25
                      Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                      From what I've read on this forum,I believe the oil less is noisier.I think at least one poster is praying his oil less will burn up so he can justify buying an oil lubed compressor.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                        Bill, I have used a palm nailer quite a bit in the past, I own the senco, and I can tell you that if you are going to be setting a lot of nails in a row it will have your compressor running quite a bit. The upside is you don't have to wait for it to catch up as much you would with guns because there is no danger of half setting a nail due to pressure loss. You will still have to let it catch up sometimes though.

                        I would get the biggest compressor you can accommodate.

                        Also, as far as the noise goes the compressor will be the least of your worries if using a palm nailer in a confined space. It is a very loud tool and makes constant noise while in use. Comfortable hearing protection is a must. I would liken it to a jackhammer when you have your head next to it.
                        A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                          As a rule of thumb, aluminum compressor heads are noisier than cast iron, oilless are noisier than oil sump, and direct drive are noisier than pulley drive (higher rpm on the compressor).
                          I have a Campbell-Hausfeld Extreme Duty 110v/220v type (belt drive, oil sump, cast iron compressor head) that is quiet. I cannot hear it while in the house with it running in the attached garage. You can carry on a conversation without yelling standing five feet from it. Output is 6.8 avg cfm at 90 psi, (I have mine set to cut off at 120 psi) enough for nail guns, a small HVLP, and will run a pneumatic sander altho with the sander occasional catching up is needed.
                          CH does make aluminum head compressors which are noisier. I think only the Extreme Duty are the cast iron. The size I bought (20 gal tank) is available as a horizontal tank or vertical tank (compressor on top) and is mobile (has wheels and handle). Downside is it weighs about 300 lbs, too heavy to get in and out of a pick-up without help or a long ramp.
                          Bottom line, there are quiet air compressors out there. The trade-off is weight.
                          Go
                          Practicing at practical wood working

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                          • #28
                            Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                            Here’s an update on my quest for the holy grail – a method of nailing two boards together as in studs to plates or joist hangers or decks to joists and the like. Also need to be able to use finish nails without doing mortal damage to cabinets, baseboards and that kind of stuff.

                            With your help I decided that the answer is a palm nailer. I went looking for one at HD and Lowes with no success. At HD I found one lonesome Senco with the largest barrel they make and nobody to tell me what else they might be willing to sell me. At Lowe’s it basically was the same story but the one they had was a Bostich and the sales person? Spoke a language other than English and had not the faintest clue what a nailer was (I think she had in mind a cuticle trimmer). We went away somewhat confused and P.O.’d.
                            The next stop was Western Tool. There at last the sales person was knowledgeable and helpful. He told me that the new Senco’s have the striker magnetized so you don’t have to worry about losing the magnet. Anybody know if that’s really the case? They carried a Pioneer Tool Co. palm nailer that looked a lot like the P-C’s in the catalogs. I’ve never heard of Pioneer. Has anybody used them? If so what’s your opinion?
                            In the meantime a buddy of mine who is a contractor loaned me his old beat-up Senco A9 with it’s magnet long lost. He also loaned me a 4 gallon Hitachi hot dog compressor to try.
                            I found that the nailer works fine but I have a hard time keeping the nail perpendicular to the work piece. To solve this I bored a hole in a 4” x 4” x ¾ board slightly larger than the outside diameter of the nailer’s barrel. I’m hoping this simple jig will work to give me something to guide the nail by putting the barrel in the hole. My hands are completely out of the way and that’s exactly where I want them. If it works I’ll make up another one with a slanted hole (about 22 degrees I figure) for toe-nailing. I won’t get a chance to try it until tomorrow. Anybody got a better solution?
                            I solved the compressor noise problem by putting the compressor outside the shop and running the air hose into my workplace. Amazing how the problems we anticipate the most turn out to be the simplest to solve isn’t it? The main noise problem is the nailer itself. The first time it drove a nail I about jumped out of my shoes it scared me so. Now I put on the ear protectors before I start.
                            Stay tuned for the next exciting episode.

                            Blind Bill

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                            • #29
                              Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                              I bought a Pioneer palm nailer from Western Tool. After I tried it I found that the hole in a flat board idea didn’t work because the nail had no support beyond where it left the barrel. My next try at a jig was a piece of ¾” MDF about 6” long and 1” wide. I cut a shallow groove (about the width of a 6d nail in about an inch from one end of the board (stick). The idea was that the slot would hold the nail upright or perpendicular to the work piece until the nailer could start it, then I would remove the board and drive the nail home. This worked so well that I zoomed over to HF and caught a 5 gallon compressor (oil type with cast iron heads) on sale and scooped it up. I’m going to widen the base a little on the jig by gluing a ¼” board a couple of inches wide to the bottom of the jig to keep it from rolling.

                              I’m now a happy nailer and now I have to start on the shed to justify the new tools.

                              Blind Bill

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                              • #30
                                Re: Advice Needed on Nail and Brad Guns

                                Congratulations Bill.

                                I'm glad you got it all figured out.

                                I admire your perseverance.
                                Cheers! - Jim
                                -------------
                                All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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