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  • Shop walls

    I am re-aranging my shop and added another wall into the design. I know I know... what the he#$ would I add a wall for in the shop as it would eat up room. In fact the area I am adding the wall to will cover my hot water heater and air-conditioner pre-filter unit in the shopage. So the wall will in fact keep me from hiting important gas lines with stray lumber and also keep dust etc out of the airconditioner pre-filter and the gas combustion from the aforementioned aironditioner/heater and the water heater gas unit. Also it will give me some added space to hang jigs, blade holders etc etc etc. So my question is what is a viable material to cover the finished wall with. Should I go with standard dry-wall or would 1/2 or 3/4 inch ply be stronger to hang shelving jigs ect from. keep in mind the front wall is only 8' tall by 10 foot long with a corner wall 8'tall by 5' long. On one last note while the wall still isnt finished any idea for cool features to add into the wall. It will be dedicated to shop area so now is the time so to speak. I have already started toying around with the idea to build a built in holder for sheet goods etc. Any other ideas.

    thanks in advance

  • #2
    Re: Shop walls

    You could use slot wall panels. That would allow a lot of versatility in hanging shelves or just about anything else.

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    • #3
      Re: Shop walls

      Hugely variable and personal topic, Drift. W.Weasel had a i=nice suggestion but if you're like me and want to do it on the cheap the drywall suggestion is probably about as cheap as they come. I covered a wall in my basement machine shop with tempered hardboard - $6/ sheet at the time, but my wood shop is done in OSB which was $5/sheet (that tells how long ago that was!!). Each has its strong points and its weaknesses. I like the OSB because I can hang anything almost anywhere and it's pretty resistant to any of my attempts to swing a board and put it through a wall when I'm not watching.

      Good luck and keep us posted.
      Later,
      Chiz

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      • #4
        Re: Shop walls

        You may wish to investigate building codes in your area and utilize some of the fire code wall building requirements eg fireproof sheetrock and fireproof caulking at the wall and ceiling intersections.

        In one of last years editions of American Woodworker, which I can not now find "Arrrrrh", there is a clever wall hanging system that uses strips of 3/4 and 1/4 inch plywood which I built for my shop. To quote from "The Road Less Traveled" "...it has made all the difference."

        Tom

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        • #5
          Re: Shop walls

          If possible, adding an outlet or 2 might not be a bad idea either. You can never have enough access to power.....
          Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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          • #6
            Re: Shop walls

            Originally posted by Tom W View Post
            You may wish to investigate building codes in your area and utilize some of the fire code wall building requirements eg fireproof sheetrock and fireproof caulking at the wall and ceiling intersections.

            In one of last years editions of American Woodworker, which I can not now find "Arrrrrh", there is a clever wall hanging system that uses strips of 3/4 and 1/4 inch plywood which I built for my shop. To quote from "The Road Less Traveled" "...it has made all the difference."

            Tom
            Tom brings up a very important point on codes. Especially when it comes to walling in your furnace and water heater. In my area, any kind of wall for that area must contain a certain amount of "air entry" surface. In other words, it would have to have some area of wall dedicated to allowing air to flow through into the area where the heaters are. This is so the units can get enough air for combustion. Keep that in mind when putting up your wall!!

            For the wall hanging system, I too have seen that system of 3/4" ply and 1/4" hangers. The idea is to attach the 3/4" ply to the wall, with a kerf cut that will allow the 1/4" hanger to "mate" with. The 1/4" mating piece has an attached block of 1/2" (the offset piece). I don't think I can describe it, and I can't find a picture anywhere!!! You put the 3/4" piece on the wall, and attach the 1/4"+offset block on the piece that's to hang. Using this method, you can do shelves, pockets, all kinds of jigs and hangers.
            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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            • #7
              Re: Shop walls

              3/4" sheetrock inside, maybe 2 receptacles, plywood or chip board shop side, painted, so dust don't stick too bad. Then install 12" x 12" wall vents near bottom of wall, at least 2 for cross ventilation, with filters and don't forget to change them or at least clean them. If you put up a door maybe think about a screen door.
              Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

              http://www.contractorspub.com

              A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Shop walls

                Great suggestions all thanks. love the slot wall suggestion I remember seing it in an article something about how to super-organize your shop something to that effect. VAsandy I took the code into suggestion and took a look seems like I have to have 18" of free space in there. So I kicked the wall out another 12 inches (word of suggestion after you build the wall take a few days and move it around before securing it to the floor and cieling). Will let you all know how it comes out.

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