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  • Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

    Hey all,

    Today I made a jig for my BS which is similar to the Bandsaw Mill which Rockler used to sell. I saw one on John Lucas' website a while back but the price of close to $180 was outrageous (I thought anyway).

    I have been thinking about building my own since I got my new BS and low and behold here in the latest issue of WOOD (May 2007) they have an article on building one. I think they must have tapped into my computer 'cause their version looks similar to one I was working on a while back, so I guess my design wasn't that bad. Anyway, I am working on a version that will be more like a sliding table for a BS than a sled style jig.

    Anyway, I followed their plan for the most part and now have a decent jig for resawing lumber or for sawing logs into short lumber. My version will handle logs close to 24" long, and up to 30" is I add my auxiliary table to the BS to support the sled. This jig can also be split apart and the top portion used as a 10" high fence on your BS. when the fence is mounted on the sled part the jig is used on the outboard side of the blade, just the opposite of how it is shown in the photo when used as a high fence. Of course you could use the fence on the outboard side also, this is handy when you have the table tilted as the fence can then help support the wood during the cut.

    I took a rough cut piece of Red Oak I had in the shop about 6" wide for a test piece and shaved off 6 nice slices 1/16" thick. I want to try some 12" pieces next. I found that if I remove the throat plate on my BS that all the sawdust goes right down into the lower cabinet where the dust collector grabs it. With the insert in place too much sawdust bounces off and lands on the table top. This happens because the bottom edge of the wood is 3/4" above the table surface when it's mounted in the jig.

    I plan to add a method of adjusting the advance using some threaded rod and a hand crank. They current method the jig uses to control thickness adjustment is difficult.

    A worthwhile jig if you are looking to resaw some lumber or drag a couple logs out of the wood pile and slice them up. It is used in the same manner as the commercial jig shown on John's website.

    You can see the jig in action here.
    Last edited by Bob D.; 03-17-2007, 07:04 PM. Reason: Fixed some typos & added links.
    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

  • #2
    Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

    Great stuff, Bob! My neighbor cut a black walnut into firewood. I grabbed a bunch of it before she gave it away. This jig would be perfect for all these pieces.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

      All the good stuff I come across cracks so bad it's not usuable. I guess it's just too hot here in Arizona for slow drying.
      Congratulations to Mr. "the sky is falling" Al Gore, nominated the new Village Idiot!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

        Wood Meister, one problem you're probably running into is it's too dry! The moisture in the wood is pulled out so fast, the material cracks. One solution may be to set the stickered pieces in a place that will allow you to control the humidity.
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

          You should really leave it in log form for a min. 2yrs. (without the bark) in a dry area of course, and if it does crack thats where you should try to send your blade through after you square out your log or one side (however you want to start). I've got a lot of native Black Ash, and Maple thats been drying up at the shack for I would guess 4 yrs. now, and most of them do crack, but not all. I take the bark off my stuff because it will promote rot on the outer surface and thats good lumber, it also promotes bugs for digging in, and helps in the drying process. When I get lumber from a log, I square it out first, then I cut 1 board then rotate untill I get to my desired area in the center, then I save the center for something special (3"x3" or 4"x4"). Anyhow thats the way I was taught many moons ago, and I'll tell you what, the Black Ash we get around here is some really beautiful stuff, the maple is not a very hard, hardwood, but its ok to use. Ya VASandy is correct about control humidity, and no direct sun light, I made a spot under the shack and all the logs are stacked and not separated, plastic on ground and plastic on my floor joists so they don't grab all that moisture, all four direction are open to allow a breeze, but no rain water attacking the piles, works for me.
          Last edited by garager; 03-18-2007, 10:59 AM.
          Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

          http://www.contractorspub.com

          A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

            Yea, summers here are 115+ with less than 10% humidity. I've heard of putting the pieces in trash bags with one 1/4" hole punched in it and then putting them up in the overhead rafters for a few years. Also heard of doing some drying in a microwave with good results too.

            Mark
            Congratulations to Mr. "the sky is falling" Al Gore, nominated the new Village Idiot!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

              I disagree on keeping it in the log form, cut it as green as possible.


              The reason is as wood drys it shrinks, and when you look at the growth rings, there is only so many cells on the rings, and they all shrink at the same rate, thus it is going to radial crack,

              one thing that will help reduce cracking, and since your dealing with small pieces, it is probably the same as end cracking, but probably ending up going through the whole piece,

              the grain of the wood allows the ends to dry faster, so one needs to coat with a sealant, (latex paint, wax, or some thing similar, they make a log end sealant), and let it dry from the cut broad surfaces,

              you may need to build a box and put a pan of water in the box so to keep the humidity up as it drys down, put some vents on the sides so it will dry but it will be controlled, sounds like you getting kiln checking,

              below is a picture of my log sawing mill I made a number of years ago, picture is of my son when he was in Jr Hi school.
              Attached Files
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

                Your right about cutting right away, but I'm not set up like you are. So Ill let mine dry out in log form and I'm not talking 8-10ft. long 24"-30" in diameter. My stuff are about 30"-48" long and 6"-8" in diameter. I do get checking on the ends but for most cases its alright through the rest. I wish I can do what you are doing, but don't have that type of band saw. Did you build that one? A new guy down the block has one, moved in last fall and said he'll do what ever I need for a case of beer and give him a hand, and I have a truck load of oak dunnage 6"x6"-8"x8" from my brother work site. Easier for this guy to do it than me with that kind of equipment.
                Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                http://www.contractorspub.com

                A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

                  yes I made it, it uses the same blade length as Wood Mizers band saws, and the bearings are trailer spindles in reverse, I used the hub to bolt to the frame, (you could shim for alignment if necessary that way when bolting on), and then put the pulley on the shaft, one of the big changes I would make if doing again would be to use a electric clutch like what is used on a lawn mower PTO, (to run the deck), instead of the manual clutch I made, what I made works OK, but it would just be so much easier to use an electric clutch and a switch, I just push the carriage over the log, and it runs on a angle Iron track and basically the wheels are V belt pulleys,
                  Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                  attributed to Samuel Johnson
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

                    Info I have gleaned from wood millers at several sites:
                    Drying lumber can be a very complicated process. Too fast and it will check and split. Too slow and the bugs get to it. The only way to insure no bugs are alive in it (post powder beetle larva, etc) is to kiln dry it at 140 degrees for 24 hours (and that is 140 degrees through the whole thickness, so thicker wood requires longer time). Most lumber yards mill (cut to thickness), air dry for several weeks to a couple months (down to 12%mc - moisture content), and then kiln dry with a schedule that allows the wood to gradually get used to the raising temp. (That is for furniture grade. Mill to kiln in the same day results in the pieces you see at the borg that are warped, cupped, and go "sproing" when you rip them).
                    Here in NC, rule of thumb for air dry is 3 to six months per inch thickness of wood depending on species. Hardwoods like oak, ash, and walnut are closer to the 6 month mark. Very hard wood like hickory or pecan may be longer, and oily woods take longer. Dry climates like Arizona may be different, but realize that the relative humidity of the air does not reflect the moisture content of the wood. Air and wood are two different mediums and the moisture retention properties are different. You can air dry wood to below 12%mc in air that never falls below 35% relative humidity. Below 5% mc will result in very little change in the wood when you cut it. Above 7% you may get some warp or twist if you resaw or rip. If it is branch wood, it has a lot of internal stress, so may warp, twist regardless of how dry it is. If you have a climate controlled shop it is best to bring the wood in and let it acclimate a week or two before milling it.
                    AnchorSeal is a good end sealant to minimize splitting on the ends. I have tried latex paint but still got checking/splitting in the ends for green lumber starting at 25+% mc. If you are a turner, and want the wood to remain green for your blanks, coating it with wax is best. After you turn that bowl, etc, you may have to douse it in alcohol and wrap it in a paper bag to let it slowly dry out to prevent splitting. Rechuck after drying for that final sanding/polishing.
                    I know several people that have had good luck "attic drying" their wood. The increased temp speeds the process, it is protected from sun and rain, and if the attic is well ventilated, air movement is enough to dry it. It still requires stickering to allow the air to move over all the wood surface, as well as close inspection for bug sign (don't want to bring the termites in y'know!). Bugs like post powder beetle don't usually mess with pine, but if you have an old house built from oak, etc, check the wood closely.

                    JMTCW
                    Go
                    Last edited by Gofor; 03-18-2007, 09:16 PM.
                    Practicing at practical wood working

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Bandsaw Lumber Maker Jig

                      drying defects in wood
                      http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/us.../chapter08.pdf
                      index of manual
                      http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/usda/ah188/ah188.htm

                      other info,
                      http://www.valuecreatedreview.com/kilnasc.htm
                      http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplrp/fplrp548.pdf
                      http://owic.oregonstate.edu/pubs/for55.pdf
                      http://muextension.missouri.edu/expl...try/g05550.htm
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                      Comment

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