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  • 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

    I stopped fretting about the table not being perfectly flat (haven't bothered checking it lately) and finished assembling the saw and have a few questions.

    With a Freud 50 tooth combination blade making some test cuts in dimensional lumber, 2by4's and six's, there's slight tearout at the back (operator side) of the piece as well as some on the bottom of the board. Checking with a tri-square, the cut pieces look square; haven't tried a bevel yet. Any ideas what might be causing this?

    The Fence: It's slightly higher in the front. Loosened the bolts on the front rail but it can't go down any further. If I try (I haven't) raising the rear rail, the miter gauge would strike the rear rail. I have it aligned square, actually slightly toed out. It moves smoothly and I'm happy with it but thought I'd ask about the height thing.

    The Motor's definately not soft start.

    And Finally - The SPLITTER

    There's some flex in that assembly, right? Raising and lowering the blade guard will tweak it left or right. Still working on final adjustment of this. Haven't tried ripping yet.


    Lance
    You know, Hobbes, some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help.

  • #2
    Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

    If you don't have one I'd strongly suggest you make or invest in a zero clearance throat plate. I think you'll find that it will eliminate most if not all of your tearout problem.

    Yes, there is some flex in the splitter assembly. However, when you get it fine tuned the flexing should become a non issue. You'll find that even after removing it for dado cuts and other non-through cuts that when remounted no adjustments will be necessary. It took me a little time to get mine properly aligned but once I did it's stayed aligned.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

      You definitely will get rid of alot of tearout with a zero clearance throatplate. My ridgid came with a zero clearance throatplate, I dont see why yours wouldn't have.
      The tearout at the back of the piece can be eliminated by having a support piece behind what you are cutting. Some wood will have more tearout than others, plywood is a given to get tearout without proper precautions.
      www.TheWoodCellar.com

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      • #4
        Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

        I was about to post that I searched the Forum and found reference to ZCI's and tearout. Mine didn't come with a ZCI, I have two plates from MLCS that I will use for that. Thanks for the tip on the support piece Raphael. Curious as to why it helps with tearout tho?

        As far as the splitter, it sure does take some work to get it just so...


        Lance
        You know, Hobbes, some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

          agree, agree, support the back of work piece and zero clearance plate. Looked at my fence ts got about 1/16" clearance but equal all the way along. I'm glad you kept your saw, fine tune it but and enjoy it. The ruff start, I had it really bad at the beginning, everything was lined up, but my belt was too lose, I mean when it started there was a bang. It still has a somewhat ruff start but not like it was before. Once it;s up and running though, very smooth indeed. I do hope you enjoy your saw and will be pleased, since some of us sort of talked you into keeping it, I am very pleased with my saw, or I would have said nothing.
          Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

          http://www.contractorspub.com

          A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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          • #6
            Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

            The support piece supports the fibers at the back of the piece being cut. Tearout is when the blade pushes the fibers instead of cutting them.
            I use support pieces anytime their is a risk of fibers being pushed, such as when handplaning endgrain, some chisel work, alot of work with the router benefits from a support piece. It prevents frustration.
            www.TheWoodCellar.com

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            • #7
              Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

              So by support piece we mean a sacrificial piece of wood that we're going to cut thru?

              And I didn't phrase my question correctly. Meant the ZCI; how does that help with tearout?
              You know, Hobbes, some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help.

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              • #8
                Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                Doesn't blade height also affect tearout? I've read a vast range of opinions about where to set the blade height, everyone seems to have their own reasons for setting it high, low, or somewhere in the middle. It sounds reasonable to me that a low blade reduces tearout but increases the risk of kickback. I adjust my blade so the gullet is even with the stock.

                - djb
                sigpic

                A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

                Restore the Republic.

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                • #9
                  Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                  No more than 4 teeth should be above work piece, or 1/2". But when I'm ripping I'll go to 5/8", my preference. If you don't know much about tearouts, I would suggest that you get a little wet behind the ears before you start on some fancy wood. Always ask questions no matter how silly it may seem, and use feather boards, they help a great deal. When using pine besure to keep your blade clean from pitch, which in turn can cause burn marks on your work piece, and use a sharp blade.
                  Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                  http://www.contractorspub.com

                  A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                    A ZCI prevents tearout by minimizing the space between the blade and the hole in the insert, it provides more support for the wood.
                    And yes, a support piece is a sacrificial piece of wood.
                    Blade height will reduce or increase tearout, IME the higher the blade the less the tearout. But blade height will not eliminate tearout. People will debate blade height til the cows come home. In general the higher the blade will reduce burning and binding if that is a problem, not always though. If your piece is binding with a soft wood then your setup is not rightl.
                    Anyway, I set my blade height for safety(especially when ripping), tearout can be effectively dealt with using ZCIs and support pieces.
                    www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                    • #11
                      Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                      I would suggest that you get a little wet behind the ears
                      No, I am "wet behind the ears" Problem is, time. I won't be getting back to the saw till the weekend.

                      If your piece is binding with a soft wood ...
                      Not having that problem. I'm feeling OK that I have the assembly on the money. The splitter is needing a final check tho and I guess I'd better double check the trunion bolts one more time.

                      The tearout was really minimal. Not knowing what to expect, Freud blade and all, thought it best to ask.
                      You know, Hobbes, some days even my lucky rocketship underpants don't help.

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                      • #12
                        Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                        The best blade and a perfect setup will give you tearout without a ZCI and a support piece.
                        www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                        • #13
                          Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                          Originally posted by garager View Post
                          ...I would suggest that you get a little wet behind the ears before you start on some fancy wood...
                          "Wet behind the ears" means someone is immature or naive... I think you meant to say dry behind the ears(?)

                          Originally posted by Rafael View Post
                          ...IME the higher the blade the less the tearout...
                          Hmmm...Seems to me that tearout would get worse as the saw blade tooth angle increases. Negative hook blades are the ultimate in "reducing" tooth angle, and aren't they supposed to produce the least amount of tearout?

                          Are those cows I see...?

                          - djb
                          sigpic

                          A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

                          Restore the Republic.

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                          • #14
                            Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                            That's been my experience. Makes sense to me that the higher the blade the greater the angle of the teeth coming down on the piece which will push the fibers down rather than toward the operator.
                            www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                            • #15
                              Re: 3650 First test cut and some final adjustment questions

                              Originally posted by Rafael View Post
                              That's been my experience. Makes sense to me that the higher the blade the greater the angle of the teeth coming down on the piece which will push the fibers down rather than toward the operator.
                              As a matter of fact, Forrest recommends that the WWII be at least an inch higher than the stock.
                              Poplar Branch Wood Crafts

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